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Nicola S. Clayton [7]Nicola Clayton [4]
  1. Alex H. Taylor & Nicola S. Clayton (2012). Evidence From Convergent Evolution and Causal Reasoning Suggests That Conclusions on Human Uniqueness May Be Premature. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):241-242.
    We agree with Vaesen that there is evidence for cognitive differences between humans and other primates. However, it is too early to draw firm conclusions about the uniqueness of the cognitive mechanisms underlying human tool use. Tests of causal understanding are in their infancy, as is the study of animals more distantly related to humans.
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  2. Auguste M. P. von Bayern, Nicola S. Clayton & Nathan J. Emery (2011). Can Jackdaws (Corvus Monedula) Select Individuals Based on Their Ability to Help? Interaction Studies 12 (2):262-280.
    Knowing the individual skills and competences of one's group members may be important for deciding from whom to learn (social learning), with whom to collaborate and whom to follow. We investigated whether 12 jackdaws could select conspecifics based on their helping skills, which had been exhibited in a previous context. The birds were tested in a blocked-exit-situation, where they could choose between two conspecifics, one of which could be recruited inside. One conspecific had previously displayed the ability to open the (...)
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  3. James Russell, Dean Alexis & Nicola Clayton (2010). Episodic Future Thinking in 3- to 5-Year-Old Children: The Ability to Think of What Will Be Needed From a Different Point of View. [REVIEW] Cognition 114 (1):56-71.
    Assessing children's episodic future thinking by having them select items for future use may be assessing their functional reasoning about the future rather than their future episodic thinking. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, we capitalised on the fact that episodic cognition necessarily has a spatial format (Clayton & Russell, 2009; Hassabis & Maguire, 2007). Accordingly, we asked children of 3, 4, and 5 to chose items they would need to play a game (blow football) from the opposite side (...)
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  4. Nathan J. Emery & Nicola S. Clayton (2008). Imaginative Scrub-Jays, Causal Rooks, and a Liberal Application of Occam's Aftershave. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):134-135.
    We address the claim that nonhuman animals do not represent unobservable states, based on studies of physical cognition by rooks and social cognition by scrub-jays. In both cases, the most parsimonious explanation for the results is counter to the reinterpretation hypothesis. We suggest that imagination and prospection can be investigated in animals and included in models of cognitive architecture.
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  5. Nicola S. Clayton, Joanna M. Dally & Emery & J. Nathan (2007). Social Cognition by Food-Caching Corvids: The Western Scrub-Jay as a Natural Psychologist. In Nathan Emery, Nicola Clayton & Chris Frith (eds.), Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture. Oup Oxford.
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  6. Nathan Emery, Nicola Clayton & Chris Frith (eds.) (2007). Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture. OUP Oxford.
    Why are humans so clever? The 'Social intelligence' hypothesis explores the idea that this cleverness has evolved through the increasing complexity of social groups. Our ability to understand and control nature is a by-product of our ability to understand the mental states of others and to use this knowledge to co-operate or deceive. These abilities have not emerged out of the blue. They can be found in many social animals that co-operate and compete with one another, birds as well as (...)
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  7. Caroline Raby, Dean Alexis, Anthony Dickinson & Nicola Clayton (2007). Empirical Evaluation of Mental Time Travel. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):330-331.
    Although the mental time travel (MTT) hypothesis provides a rich, conceptual framework, the absence of clear, empirically tractable, behavioural criteria for determining the capacity for MTT restricts its usefulness in comparative research. Examples of empirical criteria for evaluating MTT in animals are given. We also question the authors' evaluation of semantic foresight and their even-handedness in assessing human and nonhuman behaviour.
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  8. Nicola S. Clayton (2004). Is Necessity the Mother of Innovation?Animal Innovation, Edited by Simon M. Reader and Kevin N. Laland. Oxford University Press, 2003. £50.00 (Hbk)/£19.00 (Pbk) (288 Pages). ISBN (Hbk) 0 19 852621 0/(Pbk) 0 19 852622 9. [REVIEW] Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):98-99.
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  9. Nicola S. Clayton, Timothy J. Bussey, Nathan J. Emery & Anthony Dickinson (2003). Prometheus to Proust: The Case for Behavioural Criteria for 'Mental Time Travel'. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (10):436-437.
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  10. Dominic M. Dwyer & Nicola S. Clayton (2002). A Reply to the Defenders of the Faith. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):109-111.
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  11. Daniel Griffiths, Anthony Dickinson & Nicola Clayton (1999). Episodic Memory: What Can Animals Remember About Their Past? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):74-80.
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