Search results for 'Nicola Moran' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sabina Gainotti, Nicola Moran, Carlo Petrini & Darren Shickle (2008). Ethical Models Underpinning Responses to Threats to Public Health: A Comparison of Approaches to Communicable Disease Control in Europe. Bioethics 22 (9):466-476.score: 240.0
    Increases in international travel and migratory flows have enabled infectious diseases to emerge and spread more rapidly than ever before. Hence, it is increasingly easy for local infectious diseases to become global infectious diseases (GIDs). National governments must be able to react quickly and effectively to GIDs, whether naturally occurring or intentionally instigated by bioterrorism. According to the World Health Organisation, global partnerships are necessary to gather the most up-to-date information and to mobilize resources to tackle GIDs when necessary. Communicable (...)
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  2. Jane Heal & Richard Moran (2004). Review: Moran's "Authority and Estrangement". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):427 - 432.score: 180.0
  3. Josep E. Corbi, Komarine Romdenh-Romluc, Josep L. Prades, Hilan Bensusan, Manuel de Pinedo, Carla Bagnoli & Richard Moran (2007). On Richard Moran's Authority and Estrangement. Author's Reply. Theoria 22 (58).score: 180.0
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  4. Dermot Moran (2000). Introduction to Phenomenology. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Introduction to Phenomenology is an outstanding and comprehensive guide to an important but often little-understood movement in European philosophy. Dermot Moran lucidly examines the contributions of phenomenology's nine seminal thinkers: Brentano, Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, Arendt, Levinas, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida. Written in a clear and engaging style, this volume charts the course of the movement from its origins in Husserl to its transformation by Derrida. It describes the thought of Heidegger and Sartre, phenomenology's most famous thinkers, and introduces and (...)
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  5. Dermot Moran (2004). The Philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena: A Study of Idealism in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This work is a substantial contribution to the history of philosophy. Its subject, the ninth-century philosopher John Scottus Eriugena, developed a form of idealism that owed as much to the Greek Neoplatonic tradition as to the Latin fathers and anticipated the priority of the subject in its modern, most radical statement: German idealism. Moran has written the most comprehensive study yet of Eriugena's philosophy, tracing the sources of his thinking and analyzing his most important text, the Periphyseon. (...)
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  6. Stuart Moran (2011). Reflections on the Readings of Sundays and Feasts: June - August. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (2):232.score: 60.0
    Moran, Stuart With the solemnity of the Ascension the Year A lectionary returns momentarily to the Gospel according to Matthew and, in fact, to the very end of that Gospel. We might note in the first place that Matthew makes no attempt to describe the mysterious reality that the tradition has come to call the Ascension.
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  7. Gabriel Moran (1996). A Grammar of Responsibility. Crossroad Pub. Co..score: 60.0
    [From Library Journal:] Moran (culture and communication, New York Univ.) is widely known for his many writings on religious education. In the tradition of popular philosophy, he asks what it means to speak of "responsibility" and makes an important distinction between being responsible to and being responsible for. In language accessible to all readers, he considers some current arguments about responsibility, e.g., the responsibility of present-day Germans for the Holocaust or Americans for Hiroshima, and tries to clarify the issue (...)
     
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  8. Richard A. Moran (1988). Making Up Your Mind: Self-Interpretation and Self-Constitution. Ratio 1 (2):135-51.score: 30.0
  9. Dermot Moran (2008). Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy and the Critique of Naturalism. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):401-425.score: 30.0
    Throughout his career, Husserl identifies naturalism as the greatest threat to both the sciences and philosophy. In this paper, I explicate Husserl’s overall diagnosis and critique of naturalism and then examine the specific transcendental aspect of his critique. Husserl agreed with the Neo-Kantians in rejecting naturalism. He has three major critiques of naturalism: First, it (like psychologism and for the same reasons) is ‘countersensical’ in that it denies the very ideal laws that it needs for its own justification. Second, naturalism (...)
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  10. Richard Moran, Metaphor.score: 30.0
    Metaphor enters contemporary philosophical discussion from a variety of directions. Aside from its obvious importance in poetics, rhetoric, and aesthetics, it also figures in such fields as philosophy of mind (e.g., the question of the metaphorical status of ordinary mental concepts), philosophy of science (e.g, the comparison of metaphors and explanatory models), in epistemology (e.g., analogical reasoning), and in cognitive studies (in, e.g., the theory of concept-formation). This article will concentrate on issues metaphor raises for the philosophy of language, with (...)
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  11. Richard Moran (2004). Anscombe on 'Practical Knowledge'. In J. Hyman & H. Steward (eds.), Agency and Action (Royal Institute of Philosophy Suppl. 55). Cambridge University Press. 43-68.score: 30.0
    Among the legacies of Elizabeth Anscombe's 1957 monograph Intention are the introduction of the notion of 'practical knowledge' into contemporary philosophical discussion of action, and her claim, pursued throughout the book, that an agent's knowledge of what he is doing is characteristically not based on observation.' Each idea by itself has its own obscurities, of course, but my focus here will be on the relation between the two ideas, how it is that the discussion of action may lead us to (...)
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  12. Richard Moran (2004). Précis of Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):423–426.score: 30.0
  13. Dermot Moran (2000). Heidegger's Critique of Husserl's and Brentano's Accounts of Intentionality. Inquiry 43 (1):39 – 65.score: 30.0
    Inspired by Aristotle, Franz Brentano revived the concept of intentionality to characterize the domain of mental phenomena studied by descriptive psychology. Edmund Husserl, while discarding much of Brentano?s conceptual framework and presuppositions, located intentionality at the core of his science of pure consciousness (phenomenology). Martin Heidegger, Husserl?s assistant from 1919 to 1923, dropped all reference to intentionality and consciousness in Being and Time (1927), and so appeared to break sharply with his avowed mentors, Brentano and Husserl. Some recent commentators have (...)
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  14. Richard Moran (1994). The Expression of Feeling in Imagination. Philosophical Review 103 (1):75-106.score: 30.0
  15. Richard Moran (2005). Getting Told and Being Believed. Philosophers' Imprint 5 (5):1-29.score: 30.0
    The paper argues for the centrality of believing the speaker (as distinct from believing the statement) in the epistemology of testimony, and develops a line of thought from Angus Ross which claims that in telling someone something, the kind of reason for belief that a speaker presents is of an essentially different kind from ordinary evidence. Investigating the nature of the audience's dependence on the speaker's free assurance leads to a discussion of Grice's formulation of non-natural meaning in an epistemological (...)
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  16. Richard A. Moran (2003). Responses to O'Brien and Shoemaker. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):402-19.score: 30.0
  17. Richard A. Moran (2001). Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-Knowledge. Princeton University Press.score: 30.0
    Drawing on certain themes from Wittgenstein, Sartre, and others, the book explores the extent to which what we say about ourselves is a matter of discovery or...
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  18. Richard A. Moran (1997). Self-Knowledge: Discovery, Resolution, and Undoing. European Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):141-61.score: 30.0
    remarks some lessons about self-knowledge (and some other self-relations) as well as use them to throw some light on what might seem to be a fairly distant area of philosophy, namely, Sartre's view of the person as of a divided nature, divided between what he calls the self-as-facticity and the self-as-transcendence. I hope it will become clear that there is not just perversity on my part in bringing together Wittgenstein and the last great Cartesian. One specific connection that will occupy (...)
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  19. Dermot Moran (2000). Hilary Putnam and Immanuel Kant: Two `Internal Realists'? Synthese 123 (1):65-104.score: 30.0
    Since 1976 Hilary Putnam has drawn parallels between his "internal", "pragmatic", "natural" or "common-sense" realism and Kant's transcendental idealism. Putnam reads Kant as rejecting the then current metaphysical picture with its in-built assumptions of a unique, mind-independent world, and truth understood as correspondence between the mind and that ready-made world. Putnam reads Kant as overcoming the false dichotomies inherent in that picture and even finds some glimmerings of conceptual relativity in Kant's proposed solution. Furthermore, Putnam reads Kant as overcoming the (...)
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  20. Richard A. Moran (1994). Interpretation Theory and the First-Person. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (175):154-73.score: 30.0
  21. Richard Moran (2005). Problems of Sincerity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (3):341–361.score: 30.0
    It is undeniable that the assumption of sincerity is important to assertion, and that assertion is central to the transmission of beliefs through human testimony. Discussions of testimony, however, often assume that the epistemic importance of sincerity to testimony is that of a (fallible) guarantee of access to the actual beliefs of the speaker. Other things being equal, we would do as well or better if we had some kind of unmediated access to the beliefs of the other person, without (...)
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  22. Kate A. Moran (2009). Can Kant Have an Account of Moral Education? Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (4):471-484.score: 30.0
    There is an apparent tension between Immanuel Kant's model of moral agency and his often-neglected philosophy of moral education. On the one hand, Kant's account of moral knowledge and decision-making seems to be one that can be self-taught. Kant's famous categorical imperative and related 'fact of reason' argument suggest that we learn the content and application of the moral law on our own. On the other hand, Kant has a sophisticated and detailed account of moral education that goes well beyond (...)
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  23. Richard Moran & Martin J. Stone (2009). Anscombe on Expression of Intention. In Constantine Sandis (ed.), New Essays on the Explanation of Action. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
    Of course in every act of this kind, there remains the possibility of putting this act into question – insofar as it refers to more distant, more essential ends.... For example the sentence which I write is the meaning of the letters I trace, but the whole work I wish to produce is the meaning of the sentence. And this work is a possibility in connection with which I can feel anguish; it is truly my possibility...tomorrow in relation to it (...)
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  24. Richard Moran (2007). Review Essay on the Reasons of Love. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):463–475.score: 30.0
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  25. Richard Moran (1993). Impersonality, Character, and Moral Expressivism. Journal of Philosophy 60 (11):578-595.score: 30.0
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  26. Richard A. Moran (1999). The Authority of Self-Consciousness. Philosophical Topics 26 (1/2):174-200.score: 30.0
    central to virtually all contemporary thinking on self-consciousness and first-person authority. And a good measure of its importance has been not only as an evolving philosophical account of these phenomena, but also as a model of an account that places the capacity for specifically first-person awareness of one's mental states at the center of what it is to be a subject of mental states in the first place. For not every philosophical account of introspection will take its specifically first-person features (...)
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  27. Richard Moran (2007). Replies to Critics. Theoria 22 (1):53-77.score: 30.0
    In this article, I respond to the comments of six philosophers on my book Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-knowledge. My reply to Josep Corbí mostly concerns the relation between the two modes of self-knowledge I call ‘avowal’ and ‘attribution’, and the sense of activity involved in self-knoweldge; in responding to Josep Prades I try to clarify my picture of deliberation and show that it is not ‘intellectualist’ in an objectionable sense; Komarine Romdenh-Romluc’s paper enables me to say some (...)
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  28. Dermot Moran (1996). Brentano's Thesis. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 70 (70):1-27.score: 30.0
  29. Dermot Moran (2007). Fink's Speculative Phenomenology: Between Constitution and Transcendence. Research in Phenomenology 37 (1):3-31.score: 30.0
    In the last decade of his life (from 1928 to 1938), Husserl sought to develop a new understanding of his transcendental phenomenology (in publications such as Cartesian Meditations, Formal and Transcendental Logic, and the Crisis) in order to combat misconceptions of phenomenology then current (chief among which was Heidegger’s hermeneutic phenomenology as articulated in Being and Time). During this period, Husserl had an assistant and collaborator, Eugen Fink, who sought not only to be midwife to the birth of Husserl’s own (...)
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  30. Dermot Moran (1996). A Case for Philosophical Pluralism: The Problem of Intentionality. In Philosophy and Pluralism. New York: Cambridge University Press. 19-32.score: 30.0
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  31. Richard Moran (2012). Iris Murdoch and Existentialism. In Justin Broackes (ed.), Iris Murdoch, Philosopher. OUP.score: 30.0
    It is not unusual for even the very greatest polemics to proceed through some unfairness toward what they attack, indeed to draw strength from the very distortions which they impose upon their targets. In the same way that a good caricature of a person’s face enables us to see something that we feel was genuinely there to be seen all along, a conviction that persists in the face of, and may indeed be sustained by, our ongoing sense of the discrepancy (...)
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  32. Richard Moran, Metaphor, Image, and Force.score: 30.0
    take ourselves to know about the meaning of what we say. Philosophy will often find less than we thought was there, perhaps nothing at all, in what we say about the "external" world, or in our judgments of value, or in our ordinary psychological talk. The work of criticism, on the other hand, frequently disillusions by finding disturbingly more in what is said than we precritically thought was there. In our relation to the meaningfulness of what we say, there is (...)
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  33. Michael Moran (1981). On the Continuing Significance of Hegel's Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (3):214-239.score: 30.0
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  34. Richard Moran (2004). Replies to Heal, Reginster, Wilson, and Lear. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):455–472.score: 30.0
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  35. Dermot Moran (2008). Immanence, Self-Experience, and Transcendence in Edmund Husserl, Edith Stein, and Karl Jaspers. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):265-291.score: 30.0
    Phenomenology, understood as a philosophy of immanence, has had an ambiguous, uneasy relationship with transcendence, with the wholly other, with the numinous. If phenomenology restricts its evidence to givenness and to what has phenomenality, what becomes of that which is withheld or cannot in principle come to givenness? In this paper I examine attempts to acknowledge the transcendent in the writings of two phenomenologists, Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein (who attempted to fuse phenomenology with Neo-Thomism), and also consider the influence (...)
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  36. Dermot Moran & Timothy Mooney (eds.) (2002). The Phenomenology Reader. Routledge.score: 30.0
    The Phenomenology Reader is the first comprehensive anthology of classic writings from phenomenology's major seminal thinkers. The carefully selected readings chart phenomenology's most famous thinkers such as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre and Derrida as well as less well known figures such as Stein and Scheler. Each author and their writings is introduced and placed in philosophical context by the editors.
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  37. Dermot Moran (1990). Pantheism From John Scottus Eriugena to Nicholas of Cusa. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (1):131-152.score: 30.0
  38. Dermot Moran (1999). Idealism in Medieval Philosophy: The Case of Johannes Scottus Eriugena. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (1):53-82.score: 30.0
    In this article I wish to re-examine the vexed issue of the possibility of idealism in ancient and medieval philosophy with particular reference to the case of Johannes Scottus Eriugena (c. 800idealisms immaterialism as his standard for idealism, and it is this decision, coupled with his failure to acknowledge the legacy of German idealism, which prevents him from seeing the classical and medieval roots of idealism more broadly understood.
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  39. Dermot Moran (2006). Ethics and Selfhood: A Critique. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):95 – 107.score: 30.0
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  40. Theodore H. Moran (2005). Monitoring Compliance with International Labor Standards: How Can the Process Be Improved, and What Are the Implications for Inserting Labor Standards Into the WTO? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):147 - 153.score: 30.0
    The Report of the National Academy of Sciences Monitoring International Labor Standards: Techniques and Sources of Information shows that assessing compliance can be carried out in a thorough, transparent fashion, allowing alternative evaluators to identify where they disagree in assessment. Drawing on the Report and written by the Chair of the Committee that produced it, this paper offers a short overview of the principal challenges in assessing compliance with the ILO core labor standards, and offers a simple framework for investigating (...)
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  41. Dermot Moran (2010). Review of Sarah Borden Sharkey, Thine Own Self: Individuality in Edith Stein's Later Writings. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).score: 30.0
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  42. Dermot Moran (2006). Adventures of the Reduction. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (2):283-293.score: 30.0
    In his illuminating Aquinas Lecture Jacques Taminiaux offers a bold interpretation of certain contemporary European philosophers in terms of the way in which they react to and transform Husserl’s phenomenological reduction. He highlights issues relating to embodiment, personhood, and value. Taminiaux sketches Husserl’s emerging conception of the reduction and criticizes certain Cartesian assumptions that Husserl retains even after the reduction, and specifically the assumption that directly experienced mental acts and states are not given in adumbrations but present themselves as they (...)
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  43. Dermot Moran (1989). Proclus's Commentary on Plato's Parmenides. Irish Philosophical Journal 6 (1):164-166.score: 30.0
  44. Dermot Moran (2001). Editorial. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (1):1 – 2.score: 30.0
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  45. Dermot Moran (2002). Review of Cyril O'Regan, Gnostic Return in Modernity and Gnostic Apocalypse. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (5).score: 30.0
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  46. Dermot Moran (2003). Review of Thomas Duddy, A History of Irish Thought. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (1).score: 30.0
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  47. Gerard Casey, Dermot Moran, Manuel de Pinedo, Gary Elkins & Rom Harr (1995). Books Briefly Noted. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 3 (1):217 – 224.score: 30.0
    Educating the Virtues David Carr Routledge, 1991. Pp. 304. ISBN 0?415?05746?9. £35. The Philosophical Theology of St Thomas Aquinas By Leo J. Elders E. J. Brill, 1990. Pp. 332. ISBN 0?04?09156?4. $74.36. The State and Justice: An Essay in Political Theory By Milton Fisk Cambridge University Press, 1990. Pp. x + 391. ISBN 0?521?38966?6. £10.95 pbk. Perspectives on Language and Thought: Interrelations in Development Edited by S. A. Gelman and J. P. Byrnes Cambridge University Press, 1992. Pp. xii + 524. (...)
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  48. Dermot Moran (2003). A Hundred Years of Phenomenology: Perspectives on a Philosophical Tradition (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):422-423.score: 30.0
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  49. Aidan Moran & Nuala Brady (2010). Mind the Gap: Misdirection, Inattentional Blindness and the Relationship Between Overt and Covert Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1105-1106.score: 30.0
  50. Richard Moran (2007). The Reasons of Love by Harry G. Frankfurt. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):463-475.score: 30.0
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