Search results for 'Nicomachean Ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  98
    Susanne Bobzien (2014). Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, 1113b7-8 and Free Choice. In R. Salles P. Destree (ed.), What is up to us? Studies on Causality and Responsibility in Ancient Philosophy. Academia Verlag
    ABSTRACT: This is a short companion piece to my ‘Found in Translation – Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics III.5 1113b7-8 and its Reception’ in which I examine in close textual analysis the philosophical question whether these two lines from the Nicomachean Ethics provide any evidence that Aristotle discussed free choice – as is not infrequently assumed. The result is that they do not, and that the claim that they do tends to be based on a mistranslation of the (...)
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  2. Susanne Bobzien (2013). Found in Translation: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, 1113b7-8 and its Reception. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45 (2):103-148.
    ABSTRACT: This paper is distinctly odd. It demonstrates what happens when an analytical philosopher and historian of philosophy tries their hand at the topic of reception. For a novice to this genre, it seemed advisable to start small. Rather than researching the reception of an author, book, chapter, section or paragraph, the focus of the paper is on one sentence: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, 1113b7-8. This sentence has markedly shaped scholarly and general opinion alike with regard to Aristotle’s (...)
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  3. Uri D. Leibowitz (2013). Particularism in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (2):121-147.
    In this essay I offer a new particularist reading of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. I argue that the interpretation I present not only helps us to resolve some puzzles about Aristotle’s goals and methods, but it also gives rise to a novel account of morality—an account that is both interesting and plausible in its own right. The goal of this paper is, in part, exegetical—that is, to figure out how to best understand the text of the Nicomachean (...). But this paper also aims to contribute to the current exciting and controversial debate over particularism. By taking the first steps towards a comprehensive particularist reading of Aristotle’s Ethics I hope to demonstrate that some of the mistrust of particularism is misplaces and that what is, perhaps, the most influential moral theory in the history of philosophy is, arguably, a particularist moral theory. (shrink)
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  4.  65
    Aristotle (2012). Nicomachean Ethics. Courier Dover Publications.
    Aristotle identifies the goal of life as happiness and discusses its attainment through the contemplation of philosophic truth.
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  5. Aristotle (2006). Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    C. C. W. Taylor presents a clear and faithful new translation of one of the most famous and influential texts in the history of Western thought, accompanied by an analytical and critical commentary focusing on philosophical issues. In Books II to IV of the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle gives his account of virtue of character, which is central to his ethical theory as a whole and a key topic in much modern ethical writing.
     
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  6. Aristotle (2006). Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    C. C. W. Taylor presents a clear and faithful new translation of one of the most famous and influential texts in the history of Western thought, accompanied by an analytical and critical commentary focusing on philosophical issues. In Books II to IV of the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle gives his account of virtue of character, which is central to his ethical theory as a whole and a key topic in much modern ethical writing.
     
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  7.  98
    Catherine Osborne (2007). Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics – Gabriel Richardson Lear. [REVIEW] Philosophical Investigations 30 (1):92–96.
  8.  20
    Carlo Natali (2007). Rhetorical and Scientific Aspects of the Nicomachean Ethics. Phronesis 52 (4):364-381.
    There are fields of research on NE which still need attention: the edition of the text the style and rhetorical and logical instruments employed by Aristotle in setting out his position. After indicating the situation of the research on the text of NE, I describe some rhetorical devices used by Aristotle in his work: the presence of a preamble, clues about how the argument will be developed, a tendency to introduce new arguments in an inconspicuous way and the articulation of (...)
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  9. Aristotle (2004). The Nicomachean Ethics. Penguin Books.
    Of Aristotle’s works, few have had as lasting an influence on subsequent Western thought as The Nicomachean Ethics . In it, he argues that happiness consists in “activity of the soul in accordance with virtue,” defining “virtue” as both moral (courage, generosity, and justice) and intellectual (knowledge, wisdom, and insight). Aristotle also discusses the nature of practical reasoning, the different forms of friendship, and the relationship between individual virtue and the state. Featuring a lucid translation, a new introduction, (...)
     
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  10. Aristotle (2004). The Nicomachean Ethics. Penguin Books.
    Of Aristotle’s works, few have had as lasting an influence on subsequent Western thought as The Nicomachean Ethics . In it, he argues that happiness consists in “activity of the soul in accordance with virtue,” defining “virtue” as both moral (courage, generosity, and justice) and intellectual (knowledge, wisdom, and insight). Aristotle also discusses the nature of practical reasoning, the different forms of friendship, and the relationship between individual virtue and the state. Featuring a lucid translation, a new introduction, (...)
     
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  11. Aristotle (2006). Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    C. C. W. Taylor presents a clear and faithful new translation of one of the most famous and influential texts in the history of Western thought, accompanied by an analytical and critical commentary focusing on philosophical issues. In Books II to IV of the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle gives his account of virtue of character, which is central to his ethical theory as a whole and a key topic in much modern ethical writing.
     
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  12. C. D. C. Reeve (1992). Practices of Reason: Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book is an exploration of the epistemological, metaphysical, and psychological foundations of the Nicomachean Ethics. In a striking reversal of current orthodoxy, Reeve argues that scientific knowledge (episteme) is possible in ethics, that dialectic and understanding (nous) play essentially the same role in ethics as in an Aristotelian science, and that the distinctive role of practical wisdom (phronesis) is to use the knowledge of universals provided by science, dialectic, and understanding so as to best promote (...)
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  13.  18
    Aristotle (2009). The Nicomachean Ethics. OUP Oxford.
    In the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle examines the nature of happiness, which he defines as a specially good kind of life. He considers the nature of practical reasoning, friendship, and the role and importance of the moral virtues in the best life. This new edition features a revised translation and valuable new introduction and notes.
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  14. Aristotle (2004). The Nicomachean Ethics. Penguin Books.
    Of Aristotle’s works, few have had as lasting an influence on subsequent Western thought as The Nicomachean Ethics . In it, he argues that happiness consists in “activity of the soul in accordance with virtue,” defining “virtue” as both moral (courage, generosity, and justice) and intellectual (knowledge, wisdom, and insight). Aristotle also discusses the nature of practical reasoning, the different forms of friendship, and the relationship between individual virtue and the state. Featuring a lucid translation, a new introduction, (...)
     
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  15. Aristotle (2004). The Nicomachean Ethics. Penguin Books.
    Of Aristotle’s works, few have had as lasting an influence on subsequent Western thought as The Nicomachean Ethics . In it, he argues that happiness consists in “activity of the soul in accordance with virtue,” defining “virtue” as both moral (courage, generosity, and justice) and intellectual (knowledge, wisdom, and insight). Aristotle also discusses the nature of practical reasoning, the different forms of friendship, and the relationship between individual virtue and the state. Featuring a lucid translation, a new introduction, (...)
     
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  16.  80
    Aristotle (1998). Nicomachean Ethics. Dover Publications.
    Aristotle identifies the goal of life as happiness and discusses its attainment through the contemplation of philosophic truth.
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  17. Richard Kraut (ed.) (2006). The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Blackwell Pub..
    The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics illuminates Aristotle’s ethics for both academics and students new to the work, with sixteen newly commissioned essays by distinguished international scholars. The structure of the book mirrors the organization of the Nichomachean Ethics itself. Discusses the human good, the general nature of virtue, the distinctive characteristics of particular virtues, voluntariness, self-control, and pleasure.
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  18. Gabriel Richardson Lear (2005). Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics". Princeton University Press.
    Gabriel Richardson Lear presents a bold new approach to one of the enduring debates about Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics: the controversy about whether it coherently argues that the best life for humans is one devoted to a single activity, namely philosophical contemplation. Many scholars oppose this reading because the bulk of the Ethics is devoted to various moral virtues--courage and generosity, for example--that are not in any obvious way either manifestations of philosophical contemplation or subordinated to it. They (...)
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  19. Michael Pakaluk (2005). Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an engaging and accessible introduction to the 'Nicomachean Ethics', Aristotle's great masterpiece of moral philosophy. Michael Pakaluk offers a thorough and lucid examination of the entire work, uncovering Aristotle's motivations and basic views while paying careful attention to his arguments. The chapter on friendship captures Aristotle's doctrine with clarity and insight, and Pakaluk gives original and compelling interpretations of the Function Argument, the Doctrine of the Mean, courage and other character virtues, Akrasia, and the two treatments (...)
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  20. Gregory Salmieri (2009). Aristotle’s Non-‘Dialectical’ Methodology in the Nicomachean Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):311-335.
    The Nicomachean Ethics is generally thought to be a “dialectical” work, aimed at resolving aporia in a set of endoxa, which it takes as its starting-point. I argue that Aristotle’s aim in the treatise is, rather, to produce definitions of key ethical terms, and that his starting-points are limited to evaluative and discriminative judgments of a certain sort, which are demanded by the nature of the discipline and are not endoxa. I discuss also how the definitions are reached (...)
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  21.  64
    Karen Nielsen (2007). Dirtying Aristotle's Hands? Aristotle's Analysis of 'Mixed Acts' in the Nicomachean Ethics III, 1. Phronesis 52 (3):270-300.
    The analysis of 'mixed acts' in Nicomachean Ethics III, 1 has led scholars to attribute a theory of 'dirty hands' and 'impossible oughts' to Aristode. Michael Stocker argues that Aristode recognizes particular acts that are simultaneously 'right, even obligatory', but nevertheless 'wrong, shameful and the like'. And Martha Nussbaum commends Aristotle for not sympathizing 'with those who, in politics or in private affairs, would so shrink from blame and from unacceptable action that they would be unable to take (...)
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  22.  45
    István Pieter Bejczy (ed.) (2007). Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages: Commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, 1200 -1500. Brill.
    This collection surveys the tradition of medieval commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics from its thirteenth-century origins to the fifteenth century, ...
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  23.  28
    Ronna Burger (2008). Aristotle's Dialogue with Socrates: On the Nicomachean Ethics. University of Chicago Press.
    What is the good life for a human being? Aristotle’s exploration of this question in the Nicomachean Ethics has established it as a founding work of Western philosophy, though its teachings have long puzzled readers and provoked spirited discussion. Adopting a radically new point of view, Ronna Burger deciphers some of the most perplexing conundrums of this influential treatise by approaching it as Aristotle’s dialogue with the Platonic Socrates. This dialogue initially takes the shape of a debate Aristotle (...)
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  24.  4
    Otfried Höffe (ed.) (2010). Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics". Brill.
    Anyone interested in theories of moral or human practice will find in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics one of the few basic models relevant through to today.
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  25. Tobias Hoffmann, Jörn Müller & Matthias Perkams (eds.) (2013). Aquinas and the Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is the text which had the single greatest influence on Aquinas's ethical writings, and the historical and philosophical value of Aquinas's appropriation of this text provokes lively debate. In this volume of new essays, thirteen distinguished scholars explore how Aquinas receives, expands on and transforms Aristotle's insights about the attainability of happiness, the scope of moral virtue, the foundation of morality and the nature of pleasure. They examine Aquinas's commentary on the Ethics and his (...)
     
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  26. Gerard J. Hughes (2013). The Routledge Guide Book to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Routledge.
    Written by one of the most important founding figures of Western philosophy, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics represents a critical point in the study of ethics which has influenced the direction of modern philosophy. The Routledge Guidebook to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics introduces the major themes in Aristotle’s great book and acts as a companion for reading this key work, examining: The context of Aristotle’s work and the background to his writing Each separate part of the text in (...)
     
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  27. Aristotle (2006). Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    C. C. W. Taylor presents a clear and faithful new translation of one of the most famous and influential texts in the history of Western thought, accompanied by an analytical and critical commentary focusing on philosophical issues. In Books II to IV of the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle gives his account of virtue of character, which is central to his ethical theory as a whole and a key topic in much modern ethical writing.
     
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  28. Susanne Bobzien (2014). Choice and Moral Responsibility in Nicomachean Ethics III 1-5. In R. Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press 81-109.
    ABSTRACT: This paper serves two purposes: (i) it can be used by students as an introduction to chapters 1-5 of book iii of the NE; (ii) it suggests an answer to the unresolved question what overall objective this section of the NE has. The paper focuses primarily on Aristotle’s theory of what makes us responsible for our actions and character. After some preliminary observations about praise, blame and responsibility (Section 2), it sets out in detail how all the key notions (...)
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  29.  50
    Aristotle (2006). Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press, USA.
    In Books II to IV of the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle gives his account of virtue of character, which is central to his ethical theory as a whole and a key ...
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  30.  8
    Mehmet Metin Erginel (forthcoming). Akrasia and Conflict in the Nicomachean Ethics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    ABSTRACTIn Nicomachean Ethics VII, Aristotle offers an account of akrasia that purports to salvage the kernel of truth in the Socratic paradox that people act against what is best only through ignorance. Despite Aristotle’s apparent confidence in having identified the sense in which Socrates was right about akrasia, we are left puzzling over Aristotle’s own account, and the extent to which he agrees with Socrates. The most fundamental interpretive question concerns the sense in which Aristotle takes the akratic (...)
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  31.  14
    Verity Harte (2014). The Nicomachean Ethics on Pleasure. In Ronald Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press 288-318.
  32. David Ross & Lesley Brown (eds.) (2009). The Nicomachean Ethics. OUP Oxford.
    In the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle examines the nature of happiness, which he defines as a specially good kind of life. He considers the nature of practical reasoning, friendship, and the role and importance of the moral virtues in the best life. This new edition features a revised translation and valuable new introduction and notes.
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  33. Roger Crisp (ed.) (2012). Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, based on lectures that he gave in Athens in the fourth century BCE, is one of the most significant works in moral philosophy, and has profoundly influenced the whole course of subsequent philosophical endeavour. It is soundly located within a philosophical tradition, but its argument differs markedly from those of Plato and Socrates in its emphasis on the exercise - as opposed to the mere possession - of virtue as the key to human happiness, offering (...)
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  34.  24
    Daniel P. Maher (2012). Contemplative Friendship in Nicomachean Ethics. Review of Metaphysics 65 (4):765-794.
    In Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle’s two forms of human happiness correspond to two forms of human virtue and, I argue, to two forms of virtuous friendship. I propose that the most properly human form of happiness is achieved in contemplative friendship. This friendship is a genuinely contemplative approximation of divine life and still a specifically human life consisting in discursivespeech with others. Contemplative friends wish the good to one another as human beings and thus fulfill what friendship is more (...)
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  35. Stephen S. Bush (2008). Divine and Human Happiness in Nicomachean Ethics. Philosophical Review 117 (1):49-75.
    presents a puzzle as to whether Aristotle views morally virtuous activity as happiness, as book 1 seems to indicate, or philosophical contemplation as happiness, as book 10 seems to indicate. The most influential attempts to resolve this issue have been either monistic or inclusivist. According to the monists, happiness consists exclusively of contemplation. According to the inclusivists, contemplation is one constituent of happiness, but morally virtuous activity is another. In this essay I will examine influential defenses of monism. Finding these (...)
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  36.  27
    Howard J. Curzer (1997). Aristotle's Account of the Virtue of Temperance in Nicomachean Ethics III.10-11. Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1):5-25.
    Aristotle's Account of the Virtue of Temperance in Nicomachean Ethics III. 1 o- 11 HOWARD J. CURZER 1. INTRODUCTION maNY ?ONTEMPOX~RY SOCIAL eROBL~S arise from inappropriate indulgence in food, drink, and/or sex. Temperance is the Aristotelian virtue which governs these three things, and Aristotle's account of temperance contains important insights and useful distinctions. Yet Aristotle's account of temperance has been surprisingly neglected, despite the resurgence of virtue ethics. I shall remedy this neglect by providing a passage- by-passage (...)
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  37.  31
    Thomas P. Sherman (2002). Human Happiness and the Role of Philosophical Wisdom in the Nicomachean Ethics. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):467-492.
    Aristotle describes human happiness as a life of virtuous activity in Book One of the Nicomachean Ethics but as a life of contemplative activity and a life of ethically virtuous activity in Book Ten. In which kind of life does Aristotle ultimately believe that happiness consists? The answer lies in the role of philosophical wisdom within ethically virtuous activity. I argue that philosophical wisdom has a dual role: its exercise is the end of ethically virtuous activity and the (...)
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  38.  50
    Alfred R. Mele (1981). Choice and Virtue in the Nicomachean Ethics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (4):405-423.
    Commentators on the Nicomachean Ethics (NE) have long been laboring under the influence of a serious misunderstanding of one of the key terms in Aristotle's moral philosophy and theory of action. This term is prohairesis (choice), the importance of which is indicated by Aristotle's assertions that choice is the proximate efficient cause of action (NE 6. 1139a31--32) and that in which "the essential elements of virtue and character" lie (NE 8. x 163a2'~-23). The accepted view is that Aristotle (...)
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  39.  3
    Uri D. Leibowitz, Particularism in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.
    In this essay I offer a new particularist reading of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. I argue that the interpretation I present not only helps us to resolve some puzzles about Aristotle’s goals and methods, but it also gives rise to a novel account of morality—an account that is both interesting and plausible in its own right. The goal of this paper is, in part, exegetical—that is, to figure out how to best understand the text of the Nicomachean (...). But this paper also aims to contribute to the current exciting and controversial debate over particularism. By taking the first steps towards a comprehensive particularist reading of Aristotle’s Ethics I hope to demonstrate that some of the mistrust of particularism is misplaced and that what is, perhaps, the most influential moral theory in the history of philosophy is, arguably, a particularist moral theory. (shrink)
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  40.  43
    Vijay Mascarenhas (2010). God and the Good in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):35-59.
    By examining the systematic integration of theology, ethics, and teleology in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, I address four key interpretational aporiai: the apparently illogicality of the opening lines, the apparent contradiction between practical virtue and contemplation being the highest good, the “dominant” v. “inclusivist” views of eudaimonia, and the immanence v. transcendence of God. I show how proper attention to the link between Aristotle’s conception of the Good as “that at which all things aim” and God as the (...)
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  41. Richard Kraut (ed.) (2006). The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics_ illuminates Aristotle’s ethics for both academics and students new to the work, with sixteen newly commissioned essays by distinguished international scholars. The structure of the book mirrors the organization of the Nichomachean Ethics itself. Discusses the human good, the general nature of virtue, the distinctive characteristics of particular virtues, voluntariness, self-control, and pleasure.
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  42. C. C. W. Taylor (ed.) (2006). Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics, Books Ii--Iv: Translated with an Introduction and Commentary. OUP Oxford.
    This volume, which is part of the Clarendon Aristotle Series, offers a clear and faithful new translation of Books II to IV of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, accompanied by an analytical commentary focusing on philosophical issues. In Books II to IV, Aristotle gives his account of virtue of character in general and of the principal virtues individually, topics of central interest both to his ethical theory and to modern ethical theorists. Consequently major themes of the commentary are connections on (...)
     
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  43. Roger Crisp (ed.) (2005). Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, based on lectures that he gave in Athens in the fourth century BCE, is one of the most significant works in moral philosophy, and has profoundly influenced the whole course of subsequent philosophical endeavour. It is soundly located within a philosophical tradition, but its argument differs markedly from those of Plato and Socrates in its emphasis on the exercise - as opposed to the mere possession - of virtue as the key to human happiness, offering (...)
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  44. Anonymous (2001). Paraphrase of Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics 8 And. In David Konstan, Aspasius & Michael (eds.), On Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics 8 And. Cornell University Press
  45. David Charles (2009). Nicomachean Ethics VII. 3 : Varieties of Akrasia. In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  46. John M. Cooper (2009). Nicomachean Ethics VII. 1-2 : Introduction, Method, Puzzles. In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  47.  35
    Charles M. Young (2006). Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):118-119.
    Charles M. Young - Happy Lives and the Highest Good: an Essay on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.1 118-119 Gabriel Richardson Lear. Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004. Pp. ix + 238. Cloth, $35.00. Suppose that you and I are friends. I need a ride to the airport; you offer to take me. (...)
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  48.  21
    Tim O'Keefe, Why There Are No Fresh Starts in Metaphysics Epsilon or Nicomachean Ethics III 5.
    Metaphysics Epsilon 2-3 and Nicomachean Ethics III 5 (1114b3-25) are often cited in favor of indeterminist interpretations of Aristotle. In Metaphysics Epsilon Aristotle denies that the coincidental has an aitia, and some (e.g., Sorabji) take this as a denial that coincidences have causes. In NE III 5 Aristotle says a person's actions and character must have their origin (archê) in the agent for him to be responsible for them. From this, some conclude that Aristotle thinks a person can (...)
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  49.  37
    Aristotle (2009). The Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    He considers the nature of practical reasoning, friendship, and the role and importance of the moral virtues in the best life. This new edition features a revised translation and valuable new introduction and notes.
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  50.  9
    Natural Law Aquinas & Aristotelian Eudaimonism (2006). Many Students of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics Recognize the Value of Comparisons Between Aristotle and Modern Moralists. We Are Familiar with Some of the Ways in Which Reflection on Hume, Kant, Mill, Sidgwick, and More Recent Moral Theorists Can Throw Light on Aristotle. The Light May Come Either From Recognition of Similarities or From a Sharper Awareness of Differences.“Themes Ancient and Modern” is a Familiar Part of the Contemporary Study of Aristotle That Needs No Further Commendation. [REVIEW] In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Blackwell Pub.
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