Search results for 'Nietzsche's critique of morality' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Martin Drenthen (1999). The Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche's View of Nature and the Wild. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):163-175.score: 320.4
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche’s philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche’s philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophycan be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche’s critique of morality, environmental ethics is a (...)
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  2. Brian Leiter (1995). Morality in the Pejorative Sense: On the Logic of Nietzsche's Critique of Morality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (1):113 – 145.score: 315.0
    (1995). Morality in the pejorative sense: On the logic of Nietzsche's critique of morality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 113-145.
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  3. Donovan Miyasaki (forthcoming). (2014) Nietzsche's Naturalist Morality of Breeding: A Critique of Eugenics as Taming. In Vanessa Lemm (ed.), Nietzsche and the Becoming of Life. Fordham University Press.score: 296.4
    In this paper, I directly oppose Nietzsche’s endorsement of a morality of breeding to all forms of comparative, positive eugenics: the use of genetic selection to introduce positive improvement in individuals or the species, based on negatively or comparatively defined traits. I begin by explaining Nietzsche’s contrast between two broad categories of morality: breeding and taming. I argue that the ethical dangers of positive eugenics are grounded in their status as forms of taming, which preserves positively evaluated character (...)
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  4. Paul Katsafanas (2011). The Relevance of History for Moral Philosophy: A Study of Nietzsche's Genealogy. In Simon May (ed.), Nietzsche's 'On the Genealogy of Morality': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 256.2
    The Genealogy takes a historical form. But does the history play an essential role in Nietzsche's critique of modern morality? In this essay, I argue that the answer is yes. The Genealogy employs history in order to show that acceptance of modern morality was causally responsible for producing a dramatic change in our affects, drives, and perceptions. This change led agents to perceive actual increases in power as reductions in power, and actual decreases in power as (...)
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  5. Harold Langsam (1997). How to Combat Nihilism: Reflections on Nietzsche's Critique of Morality. History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (2):235 - 253.score: 237.0
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  6. Frithjof Bergmann (1988). Nietzsche's Critique of Morality. In Robert C. Solomon & Kathleen Marie Higgins (eds.), Reading Nietzsche. Oxford University Press. 29--45.score: 237.0
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  7. Martin Drenthen (2002). Nietzsche and the Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche's View of Nature and Morality. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):12-25.score: 236.4
    -/- In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche's philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche's philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche's critique of (...), environmental ethics is a highly paradoxical project. According to Nietzsche, each moral interpretation of nature implies a conceptual seizure of power over nature. On the other hand, Nietzsche argues, the concept of nature is indispensable in ethics because we have to interpret nature in order to have a meaningful relation with real ity. I show that awareness of this paradox opens a way for a form of respect for nature as radical otherness. (shrink)
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  8. Carsten Korfmacher (2005). On the Significance of Genealogy in Nietzsche's Critique of Morality. International Studies in Philosophy 37 (3):77-89.score: 234.0
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  9. David Owen, Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality.score: 229.2
    Combining philosophical acuity, psychological insight and a remarkably powerful prose style, On the Genealogy of Morality is a dazzling and brilliantly incisive attack on European morality. David Owen situates the Genealogy in the context of the development of Nietzsche's philosophy and offers readers a sophisticated and nuanced analysis of this great text. He provides a lucid account of Nietzsche’s reasons for adopting a “genealogical” investigation of our moral values as well as a detailed analysis of the Genealogy (...)
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  10. Matthew Caleb Flamm (2006). Santayana's Critique of Modern Philosophy and its Application to the Work of Nietzsche. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):266-278.score: 211.2
    : This article explores Santayana's critique of Modern philosophy and its connections with his views of Nietzsche. The aim is to highlight, primarily, the importance of Santayana's critique for contemporary philosophers working in the shadow of Nietzsche. The resounding view of Nietzsche is that he is an anti, and/or postmodern thinker. Santayana's critique interestingly challenges this view.
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  11. Matthew Rukgaber (2012). The "Sovereign Individual" and the "Ascetic Ideal": On a Perennial Misreading of the Second Essay of Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43 (2):213-239.score: 208.8
    The "sovereign individual" (hereafter, the SI) is almost universally held to be part of Nietzsche's positive ethical ideal.1 Focus on this isolated description at the start of the second essay of On the Genealogy of Morality results in a reconstruction of Nietzschean personhood and ethics based on the capacity to make and keep promises. For example, the SI has been used to understand us as "self-conscious beings capable of standing in autonomous ethical relations to ourselves" with a "fundamental (...)
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  12. Charles H. Pence (2011). Nietzsche’s Aesthetic Critique of Darwin. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (2):165-190.score: 207.0
    Despite his position as one of the first philosophers to write in the “post- Darwinian” world, the critique of Darwin by Friedrich Nietzsche is often ignored for a host of unsatisfactory reasons. I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of Darwin is important to the study of both Nietzsche’s and Darwin’s impact on philosophy. Further, I show that the central claims of Nietzsche’s critique have been broadly misunderstood. I then present a new reading of Nietzsche’s core criticism of Darwin. (...)
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  13. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism. In M. Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.score: 207.0
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  14. Mićo Savić (2012). Nietzsche's Critique of Moral Values. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (3):348-370.score: 202.8
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  15. David Lindstedt (1997). The Progression and Regression of Slave Morality in Nietzsche's Genealogy: The Moralization of Bad Conscience and Indebtedness. [REVIEW] Man and World 30 (1):83-105.score: 197.4
    With the advent of slave morality and the belief system it entails, human beings alone begin to advance to a level beyond that of simple, brute, animal nature. While Christianity and its belief system generate a progression, however, allowing human beings to become interesting for the first time, Nietzsche also maintains in the Genealogy that slave morality is a regression, somehow lowering or bringing them down from a possible higher level. In this paper I will argue that this (...)
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  16. Simon May (ed.) (2011). Nietzsche's on the Genealogy of Morality: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 196.8
    Machine generated contents note: List of contributors; Acknowledgements; Note on texts, translations, references; Introduction Simon May; 1. The future of evil Raymond Geuss; 2. On the nobility of Nietzsche's priests R. Lanier Anderson; 3. The genealogy of guilt Bernard Reginster; 4. Why Nietzsche is still in the morality game Simon May; 5. Who is the 'sovereign individual'? Nietzsche on freedom Brian Leiter; 6. Ressentiment and morality Peter Poellner; 7. The role of life in the Genealogy Nadeem Hussain; (...)
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  17. Lawrence J. Hatab (2008). Nietzsche's on the Genealogy of Morality: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 196.8
    Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality (1887) is a forceful, perplexing, important book, radical in its own time and profoundly influential ever since. This introductory textbook offers a comprehensive, close reading of the entire work, with a section-by-section analysis that also aims to show how the Genealogy holds together as an integrated whole. The Genealogy is helpfully situated within Nietzsche's wider philosophy, and occasional interludes examine supplementary topics that further enhance the reader's understanding of the text. Two (...)
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  18. Rebecca Bamford (2007). The Virtue of Shame: Defending Nietzsche’s Critique of Mitleid. In Gudrun von Tevenar (ed.), Nietzsche and Ethics. Peter Lang Verlag.score: 189.4
    I argue that moral intuitions about Nietzsche as an exemplar of practical cruelty can be overturned. My argument is based upon the possibility of abandoning the notion of pure and unmediated passivity as intrinsic to the phenomena of human suffering and of Mitleid, as identified by Nietzsche. I claim that wrongly identifying intrinsic passivity in the phenomenology of Mitleid and of suffering generates the moral sceptical intuition. Once this case of mistaken identity is uncovered, 1 suggest, there is no reason (...)
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  19. Alessio Vaccari (2010). La dimensión perfeccionista en la crítica de la moralidad de Friedrich Nietzsche. Télos 17 (2):171-187.score: 185.4
    The subject of the ethical vocation of Nietzsche’s thinking is arousing increasing interest in the history of the ethics of the analytic tradition. Recent studies have sought above all to dissolve the conflicts that arise from the attempt to reconcile his open immoralism with his project of revaluing all values. According to John Rawls, Nietzsche is a moral elitist: the value that he attributes to the lives of great men such as Socrates or Goethe shows that the search for knowledge (...)
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  20. Frithjof Bergmann (1985). Nietzsche's Critique of the Modality of Moral Codes. International Studies in Philosophy 17 (2):99-116.score: 178.2
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  21. F. Bergmann (1985). Nietzsche's Critique of the Modality of Moral Codes in North American Nietzsche Society Papers. International Studies in Philosophy 17 (2).score: 178.2
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  22. Imtiaz Moosa (2007). Naturalistic Explanations of Apodictic Moral Claims: Brentano's Ethical Intuitionism and Nietzsche's Naturalism. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):159 - 182.score: 175.8
    In this article (1) I extract from Brentano’s works (three) formal arguments against “genealogical explanations” of ethical claims. Such explanation can also be designated as “naturalism” (not his appellation); (2) I counter these arguments, by showing how genealogical explanations of even apodictic moral claims are logically possible (albeit only if certain unlikely, stringent conditions are met); (3) I show how Nietzsche’s ethics meets these stringent conditions, but evolutionary ethics does not. My more general thesis is that naturalism and intuitionism in (...)
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  23. Paul S. Loeb (2005). Finding the Ubermensch in Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 30 (1):70-101.score: 166.2
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  24. Mathias Risse (2001). The Second Treatise in in the Genealogy of Morality: Nietzsche on the Origin of the Bad Conscience. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):55–81.score: 164.4
    On a postcard to Franz Overbeck from January 4, 1888, Nietzsche makes some illuminating remarks with respect to the three treatises in his book On the Genealogy of Morality.2 Nietzsche says that, ‘for the sake of clarity, it was necessary artificially to isolate the different roots of that complex structure that is called morality. Each of these three treatises expresses a single primum mobile; a fourth and fifth are missing, as is even the most essential (‘the herd instinct’) (...)
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  25. J. Keeping (2012). The Thousand Goals and the One Goal: Morality and Will to Power in Nietzsche's Zarathustra. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (S1):e73-e85.score: 163.8
    Nietzsche's critical stance toward morality appears to support some version of moral relativism. Yet he praises some actions and attributes while condemning others. Are these evaluations expressions of his moral prejudices, or is there a basis for them in his thought? Through a close reading of key passages from ThusSpokeZarathustra, I attempt to demonstrate that morality for Nietzsche is the historically situated working-out of will to power and therefore subject to critique on that basis.
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  26. Stephen Mulhall (2004). Nietzsche's Genealogy of Humanity. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 66 (1):49 - 74.score: 163.8
    Nietzsche's critique of Christianity is approached by asking how far it implicitly relies upon Christian concepts and resources in implementing its criticisms. The essay first looks in detail at the parable of the madman in Gay Science, focussing in particular on its double address to theists as well as atheists; I explore its implicit invocation of Macbeth, as well as its articulation of an implicit theology of Holy Saturday, which roots the thought of God's death in Christian conceptions (...)
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  27. Jonny Anomaly (2005). Nietzsche's Critique of Utilitarianism. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 29 (29):1-15.score: 163.2
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  28. H. W. Siemens (2009). Nietzsche's Critique of Democracy (1870–1886). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 38 (1):20-37.score: 163.2
  29. Matthew Meyer (2009). Nietzsche's" Genealogy of Morality"(Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 38 (1):88-89.score: 163.2
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  30. Garrath Williams (1999). Nietzsche's Response to Kant's Morality. Philosophical Forum 30 (3):201–216.score: 162.0
    Although commentators sometimes mention a link between Kant and Nietzsche, this paper claims that the continuities in their moral thought have been insufficiently explored. I argue that Nietzsche may offer us a profound rethinking of Kant’s morality – one indebted to Kant’s ideal of critique. The paper first considers the wide apparent gulf between the thinkers. The second section seeks to explain this gulf in terms which relate to Kant’s overall project, while the final section deals with Nietzsche’s (...)
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  31. Kenneth R. Westphal (1984). Nietzsche's Sting and the Possibility of Good Philology. International Studies in Philosophy 16 (2):71-90.score: 160.8
    I have argued elsewhere that Nietzsche’s genealogical critique of religion and morality requires a cognitivist epistemology, including a correspondence conception of truth. In this essay I pose ten crucial questions concerning the consistency of Nietzsche’s epistemology with his genealogy: Does Nietzsche hold that the world is a totally characterless flux? Does he hold that there is a metaphysical distinction between appearance and reality? Does he believe that there is cognitively useful perceptual access to the world? Does he believe (...)
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  32. Thomas Bartscherer (2007). The Spectacle of Suffering: On Tragedy in Nietzsche's Daybreak. Phaenex 1 (2):71-93.score: 160.8
    This paper argues that the passages on tragedy in Nietzsche's Daybreak , taken together, articulate a conception of tragic psychology that plays a pivotal role in the overarching argument of the book. I maintain that in Daybreak , Nietzsche construes tragedy as the embodiment of a superior alternative to the (modern, Christian) moral worldview that is the main target of his critique, and that in the curious phenomenon of tragic pleasure, Nietzsche identifies a potent antidote to what he (...)
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  33. Brian Leiter (forthcoming). Friedrich Nietzsche's Twilight of the Idols. Topoi:1-7.score: 160.2
    This review essay of Nietzsche’s “Twilight of the Idols” (1888) is part of the journal TOPOI’s “Untimely Reviews” series of classic works of philosophy. Themes dealt with are Nietzsche’s attacks on morality, on free will, on mental causation, on Socrates, and on Kant. Connections are drawn with contemporary work by Mark Johnston, David Rosenthal, and Daniel Wegner, among others.
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  34. Thomas H. Brobjer (2003). Nietzsche's Affirmative Morality: An Ethics of Virtue. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 26 (1):64-78.score: 159.6
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  35. Thomas H. Brobjer (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Knowledge, Reading, and Critique of Political Economy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.score: 159.6
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  36. Jacob Golomb (2013). Values: Nietzsche's Metaethical Stance / Nadeem J.Z. Hussain ; Nietzsche and the Arts of Life / Aaron Ridley ; Nietzsche on Autonomy / R. Lanier Anderson ; The Overman / Randall Havas ; Order of Rank / Robert Guay ; 'A Promise Made is a Debt Unpaid' : Nietzsche on the Morality of Commitment and the Commitments of Morality / Mare Migotti ; Will to Power : Does It Lead to the "Coldest of All Cold Monsters"? [REVIEW] In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oup Oxford.score: 159.6
     
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  37. John Richardson (2013). Developments of Will to Power: Nietzsche's Metaphysical Sketches : Casuality and Will to Power / Peter Poellner ; The Psychology of Christian Morality : Will to Power as Will to Nothingness / Bernard Reginster ; Nietzsche's Philosophical Psychology / Paul Katsafanas ; Nietzsche on Life's Ends. In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oup Oxford.score: 159.6
     
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  38. Michael Ure (2011). Nietzsche's "On the Genealogy of Morality": An Introduction (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 41 (1):121-125.score: 159.6
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  39. Michael Ure (2011). Review Of: Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality by J.Hatab. [REVIEW] Journal of Nietzsche Studies.score: 159.6
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  40. James P. Cadello (1988). Richard Rorty's Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature: An Existential Critique. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 22 (1):67-76.score: 159.0
    Seeing philosophy as conversation with a number of fruitful avenues of discourse, Rorty seems to be caught in limbo, unwilling to follow through or commit himself to any particular line of discourse for fear of closing himself off to alternative discourses. Choosing to adopt this particular attitude he still has made a choice: he has made a commitment to non-commitment, or as Ortega puts it, “decided not to decide.” Jose Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses, trans. anonymously (New (...)
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  41. Brian Leiter, Reviews of Leiter, Nietzsche on Morality (Routledge, 2002).score: 159.0
    “The Routledge [series] is designed to introduce students to classic works of philosophy. Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality does that, and much more. The book offers a complete commentary of On the Genealogy of Morality, but it also articulates a comprehensive and original interpretation of Nietzsche’s critique of morality. The product is an exceptionally clear and cohesive account of philosophical views known neither for their clarity nor their cohesiveness…. “The distinction, and the chief merit, of Leiter’s (...)
     
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  42. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2011). Beyond Compassion: On Nietzsche's Moral Therapy in Dawn. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 44 (2):179-204.score: 156.6
    In this essay I seek to show that a philosophy of modesty informs core aspects of both Nietzsche’s critique of morality and what he intends to replace morality with, namely, an ethics of self-cultivation. To demonstrate this I focus on Dawn: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality, a largely neglected text in his corpus where Nietzsche carries out a quite wide-ranging critique of morality, including Mitleid. It is one of Nietzsche’s most experimental works and (...)
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  43. Peter Bornedal (2013). On the Institution of the Moral Subject: On the Commander and the Commanded in Nietzsche's Discussion of Law. Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 54 (128):439-457.score: 156.6
    O artigo discute como Nietzsche compreende a instituição da lei e da moral em distinção a Kant e à tradição cristã. Ele argumenta que Nietzsche é, em grande medida, inspirado pela mudança de paradigma em direção a um pensamento biológico evolutivo, introduzido por diversos de seus colegas ao final do século XIX, entre os quais F. A. Lange, que vê esta mudança como uma sóbria alternativa científico-materialista a Kant. Em Nietzsche, a imperativa moral kantiana é substituída pela noção de uma (...)
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  44. S. Y. Alabi (2007). "The Will to Power" and "The Uber-Mensch": A Critique of Friedrich Nietzsche's Transvaluation of Values. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 7 (1).score: 155.4
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  45. Mattia Riccardi (2010). Nietzsche's Critique of Kant's Thing in Itself. Nietzsche-Studien 39 (1):333-351.score: 154.2
  46. Ken Gemes (1992). Nietzsche's Critique of Truth. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):47-65.score: 154.2
    Article (Reprinted in "Oxford Readings in Philosophy: Nietzsche", edited by B. Leiter and J. Richardson, Oxford University Press, 2001.
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  47. Iain Morrisson (2003). Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality in the Human, All Too Human Series. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):657 – 669.score: 154.2
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  48. Babette E. Babich (2003). Nietzsche's Critique of Scientific Reason and Scientific Culture: On 'Science as a Problem'and 'Nature as Chaos'. In Gregory Moore & Thomas H. Brobjer (eds.), Nietzsche and Science. Ashgate. 133--53.score: 154.2
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  49. Lewis Call (1998). Anti-Darwin Anti-Spencer Friedrich Nietzsche's Critique of DARWIN And. History of Science 36:1-22.score: 154.2
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  50. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism Introduction to Nietzsche on Time and History. In , Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter. 1.score: 154.2
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