Search results for 'Nietzsche's philosophy of nature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  67
    Martin Drenthen (1999). The Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche's View of Nature and the Wild. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):163-175.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche’s philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche’s philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophycan be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche’s critique of morality, environmental ethics (...)
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  2. Alistair Moles (1990). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Nature and Cosmology. P. Lang.
     
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  3.  10
    Stephen P. Schwartz (1993). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Nature and Cosmology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (2):301-302.
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  4.  10
    George J. Stack (1991). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Nature and Cosmology. International Studies in Philosophy 23 (3):133-134.
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  5.  1
    M. Riedel, A. U. E. M. & W. Klein (1991). The «Wondrous Double Nature» of Philosophy: Nietzsche's Determination of the Original Experience of Thinking Among the Greeks. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 15 (2):49-66.
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  6.  31
    Daniel W. Conway (1997). Nietzsche's Dangerous Game: Philosophy in the Twilight of the Idols. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first book-length treatment of the unique nature and development of Nietzsche's post-Zarathustran political philosophy. This later political philosophy is set in the context of the critique of modernity that Nietzsche advances in the years 1885-1888, in such texts as Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist, The Case of Wagner, and Ecce Homo. In this light Nietzsche's own diagnosis of the ills of modernity is (...)
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  7.  31
    Martin Drenthen (2002). Nietzsche and the Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche's View of Nature and Morality. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):12-25.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche's philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche's philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche's (...)
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  8.  24
    James P. Cadello (1988). Richard Rorty's 'Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature': An Existential Critique. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 22 (1):67-76.
    Seeing philosophy as conversation with a number of fruitful avenues of discourse, Rorty seems to be caught in limbo, unwilling to follow through or commit himself to any particular line of discourse for fear of closing himself off to alternative discourses. Choosing to adopt this particular attitude he still has made a choice: he has made a commitment to non-commitment, or as Ortega puts it, “decided not to decide.” Jose Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses, trans. anonymously (...)
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  9. Daniel W. Conway (2009). Nietzsche's Dangerous Game: Philosophy in the Twilight of the Idols. Cambridge University Press.
    This 1997 work is a book-length treatment of the unique nature and development of Nietzsche's post-Zarathustran political philosophy. This later political philosophy is set in the context of the critique of modernity that Nietzsche advances in the years 1885–1888, in such texts as Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist, The Case of Wagner, and Ecce Homo. In this light Nietzsche's own diagnosis of the ills of modernity (...)
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  10. Daniel W. Conway (2011). Nietzsche's Dangerous Game: Philosophy in the Twilight of the Idols. Cambridge University Press.
    This 1997 work is a book-length treatment of the unique nature and development of Nietzsche's post-Zarathustran political philosophy. This later political philosophy is set in the context of the critique of modernity that Nietzsche advances in the years 1885–1888, in such texts as Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist, The Case of Wagner, and Ecce Homo. In this light Nietzsche's own diagnosis of the ills of modernity (...)
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  11.  11
    James E. Force (1982). The Changing Nature of Nietzsche's Gods and the Architect's Conquest of Gravity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (2):179-195.
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  12.  10
    I. I. I. Abonado (2014). The Emergence of Authentic Human Person in Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche's Philosophy of the Superman: An Hermeneutics Approach to Literary Criticism. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 5.
    The paper interprets Nietzsche’s description of authentic human person.Based on the works of Nietzsche, commentaries and philosophical interpretationsof various authors, authentic human person evolves into a superman by usingthe principles of discipline and mastery of oneself. His authenticity, however,requires persistence, courage and strength to endure many forms of sufferingsand to overcome alienation brought about by his environment. Otherwise,man would become slave of his desires or alien to his own powers, talents andcapacities. Thus, Nietzsche’s thought of superman is an invitation to (...)
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  13.  8
    Asisclo M. Abonado Iii (2014). The Emergence of Authentic Human Person in Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche’s Philosophy of the Superman: An Hermeneutics Approach to Literary Criticism. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 5 (1).
    The paper interprets Nietzsche’s description of authentic human person.Based on the works of Nietzsche, commentaries and philosophical interpretationsof various authors, authentic human person evolves into a superman by usingthe principles of discipline and mastery of oneself. His authenticity, however,requires persistence, courage and strength to endure many forms of sufferingsand to overcome alienation brought about by his environment. Otherwise,man would become slave of his desires or alien to his own powers, talents andcapacities. Thus, Nietzsche’s thought of superman is an invitation to (...)
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  14. Paul Katsafanas (2011). The Relevance of History for Moral Philosophy: A Study of Nietzsche's Genealogy. In Simon May (ed.), Nietzsche's 'On the Genealogy of Morality': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
    The Genealogy takes a historical form. But does the history play an essential role in Nietzsche's critique of modern morality? In this essay, I argue that the answer is yes. The Genealogy employs history in order to show that acceptance of modern morality was causally responsible for producing a dramatic change in our affects, drives, and perceptions. This change led agents to perceive actual increases in power as reductions in power, and actual decreases in power as increases in power. (...)
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  15.  36
    Matthew Caleb Flamm (2006). Santayana's Critique of Modern Philosophy and its Application to the Work of Nietzsche. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):266-278.
    : This article explores Santayana's critique of Modern philosophy and its connections with his views of Nietzsche. The aim is to highlight, primarily, the importance of Santayana's critique for contemporary philosophers working in the shadow of Nietzsche. The resounding view of Nietzsche is that he is an anti, and/or postmodern thinker. Santayana's critique interestingly challenges this view.
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  16.  29
    Vanessa Lemm (2009). Nietzsche's Animal Philosophy: Culture, Politics, and the Animality of the Human Being. Fordham University Press.
    The animal in Nietzsche's philosophy -- Culture and civilization -- Politics and promise -- Culture and economy -- Giving and forgiving -- Animality, creativity, and historicity -- Animality, language, and truth -- Biopolitics and the question of animal life.
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  17. Julian Young (2011). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    In his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche observes that Greek tragedy gathered people together as a community in the sight of their gods, and argues that modernity can be rescued from 'nihilism' only through the revival of such a festival. This is commonly thought to be a view which did not survive the termination of Nietzsche's early Wagnerianism, but Julian Young argues, on the basis of an examination of all of Nietzsche's published works, that his religious (...)
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  18.  36
    Julian Young (1992). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive treatment of Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art to appear in English. Julian Young argues that Nietzsche's thought about art can only be understood in the context of his wider philosophy. In particular, he discusses the dramatic changes in Nietzschean aesthetics against the background of the celebrated themes of the death of God, eternal recurrence and the idea of the Ubermensch. Young then divides Nietzsche's career, and his philosophy of art, into (...)
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  19.  11
    Martin Drenthen (2009). Nietzsche and the Paradox of Environmental Ethics. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):12-25.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche's philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche's philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche's (...)
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  20. Anthony K. Jensen (2013). Nietzsche's Philosophy of History. Cambridge University Press.
    Nietzsche, the so-called herald of the 'philosophy of the future', nevertheless dealt with the past on nearly every page of his writing. Not only was he concerned with how past values, cultural practices and institutions influence the present - he was plainly aware that any attempt to understand that influence encounters many meta-historical problems. This comprehensive and lucid exposition of the development of Nietzsche's philosophy of history explores how Nietzsche thought about history and historiography throughout his life (...)
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  21. Anthony K. Jensen (2015). Nietzsche's Philosophy of History. Cambridge University Press.
    Nietzsche, the so-called herald of the 'philosophy of the future', nevertheless dealt with the past on nearly every page of his writing. Not only was he concerned with how past values, cultural practices and institutions influence the present - he was plainly aware that any attempt to understand that influence encounters many meta-historical problems. This comprehensive and lucid exposition of the development of Nietzsche's philosophy of history explores how Nietzsche thought about history and historiography throughout his life (...)
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  22. Julian Young (2009). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a clear and lucid account of Nietzsche's philosophy of art, combining exegesis, interpretation and criticism in a judicious balance. Julian Young argues that Nietzsche's thought about art can only be understood in the context of his wider philosophy. In particular, he discusses the dramatic changes in Nietzschean aesthetics against the background of the celebrated themes of the death of God, eternal recurrence, and the idea of the Übermensch. Young then divides Nietzsche's career and (...)
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  23. Julian Young (2011). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a clear and lucid account of Nietzsche's philosophy of art, combining exegesis, interpretation and criticism in a judicious balance. Julian Young argues that Nietzsche's thought about art can only be understood in the context of his wider philosophy. In particular, he discusses the dramatic changes in Nietzschean aesthetics against the background of the celebrated themes of the death of God, eternal recurrence, and the idea of the Übermensch. Young then divides Nietzsche's career and (...)
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  24.  18
    R. Lanier Anderson (2013). Love and the Moral Psychology of the Hegelian Nietzsche: Comments on Robert Pippin's Nietzsche, Psychology, and First Philosophy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):158-180.
    In Nietzsche, Psychology, and First Philosophy, Robert Pippin suggests intriguing connections between Nietzsche and the traditional French moralistes, especially Montaigne, Pascal, and La Rochefoucauld. 1 But the point of placing Nietzsche in this company is philosophical, not historical. In contrast to the wide-ranging and detailed historical analyses that have found their place in Pippin’s ongoing history of modernism (Modernism as a Philosophical Problem; Idealism as Modernism: Hegelian Variations), the present book does not focus on repairing our awareness of the (...)
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  25. Alenka Zupan I. (2003). The Shortest Shadow: Nietzsche's Philosophy of the Two. The MIT Press.
    What is it that makes Nietzsche Nietzsche? In The Shortest Shadow, Alenka Zupancic counters the currently fashionable appropriation of Nietzsche as a philosopher who was "ahead of his time" but whose time has finally come -- the rather patronizing reduction of his often extraordinary statements to mere opinions that we can "share." Zupancic argues that the definitive Nietzschean quality is his very unfashionableness, his being out of the mainstream of his or any time.To restore Nietzsche to a context in which (...)
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  26.  3
    Carl Pletsch (1977). History and Friedrich Nietzsche's Philosophy of Time. History and Theory 16 (1):30-39.
    Though Nietzsche never developed a theory of history, his comments on time yield a radical approach to historical interpretation. Central to this philosophy is the concept of eternal recurrence. Time, with neither boundary nor purpose, returns from the past to repeat itself in its same form. This generates a psychological and moral problem for men, as it fails to provide the elements of meaning which Nietzsche considered essential to the human psyche. Men survive the aimlessness of history by living (...)
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  27. Julian Young (2009). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    In his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche observes that Greek tragedy gathered people together as a community in the sight of their gods, and argues that modernity can be rescued from 'nihilism' only through the revival of such a festival. This is commonly thought to be a view which did not survive the termination of Nietzsche's early Wagnerianism, but Julian Young argues, on the basis of an examination of all of Nietzsche's published works, that his religious (...)
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  28. Julian Young (2006). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    In his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche observes that Greek tragedy gathered people together as a community in the sight of their gods, and argues that modernity can be rescued from 'nihilism' only through the revival of such a festival. This is commonly thought to be a view which did not survive the termination of Nietzsche's early Wagnerianism, but Julian Young argues, on the basis of an examination of all of Nietzsche's published works, that his religious (...)
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  29. Vanessa Di Stefano (ed.) (2016). Nietzsche's Death of God and Italian Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    With a preface by Gianni Vattimo, this book offers both an overview of contemporary Italian philosophy and a new interpretation of Nietzsche’s ‘God is Dead’ in connection with the notion of freedom as the original dynamic of the will to power.
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  30.  59
    Brian Leiter, A New Approach to the Question of Nietzsche's Political Philosophy: A Review of Tamsin Shaw's. [REVIEW]
    Against the two dominant strands in the secondary literature on Nietzsche's political philosophy - one attributing to Nietzsche a kind of flat-footed commitment to aristocratic forms of social ordering, the other denying that Nietzsche has any political philosophy at all-Tamsin Shaw stakes out a new and surprising position: namely, that Nietzsche was very much concerned with the familiar question of the moral or normative legitimacy of state power, but was skeptical that with the demise of religion, it (...)
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  31.  28
    Rebecca Bamford (2008). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Religion (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 488-490.
    Readers might be forgiven raised eyebrows on first noting the title of Julian Young's book. Young's chief and surprising claim is that, even though Nietzsche "rejects the God of Christianity, he is not anti-religious," and that he is " above all a religious thinker" , whose atheism only applies in the case of the Christian God , and whose early "religious communitarianism" or "Wagnerianism" persist throughout the texts . Young defines Nietzsche's early thought as communitarian by virtue of concern (...)
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  32.  92
    Eric Steinhart (1999). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Mathematics. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (3):19-27.
    Nietzsche has a surprisingly significant and strikingly positive assessment of mathematics. I discuss Nietzsche's theory of the origin of mathematical practice in the division of the continuum of force, his theory of numbers, his conception of the finite and the infinite, and the relations between Nietzschean mathematics and formalism and intuitionism. I talk about the relations between math, illusion, life, and the will to truth. I distinguish life and world affirming mathematical practice from its ascetic perversion. For Nietzsche, math (...)
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  33.  2
    Tim Themi (2008). How Lacan's Ethics Might Improve Our Understanding of Nietzsche's Critique of Platonism: The Neurosis and Nihilism of a 'Life'Against Life. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 4 (1-2):328-346.
    This paper sets to answering the question of how Lacan’s 1959-60 Seminar on The Ethics of Psychoanalysis[1], with its recurring critique of the Platonic idea of a moral Sovereign Good, might contribute to and improve our understanding of the Nietzschean project to diagnose the moral metaphysics instigated by Plato in philosophy, and by Christianity in religion, as a history of untruth and nihilism––opposed to life––in preparation for its overcoming. I explore the possibility that Lacan’s Ethics might make such a (...)
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  34.  15
    Keith Ansell-Pearson (2014). The Flame of Eternity: An Interpretation of Nietzsche's Thought by Krzysztof Michalski, And: Philosophy and Temporality From Kant to Critical Theory by Espen Hammer. [REVIEW] Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (3):497-500.
    According to Krzysztof Michalski, Nietzsche’s intellectual project, from start to finish, has an overarching and unifying theme, namely a reflection on time, including the passing of human life, the emergence of new things, and the general finitude of existence. For him, then, it is possible to organize Nietzsche’s thought into a coherent whole around the concept of “eternity,” where eternity signifies a dimension of time, indeed, the core of it, its essence and engine. Typically, we think of eternity as a (...)
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  35. Graham Parkes (1994). Composing the Soul: Reaches of Nietzsche's Psychology. University of Chicago Press.
    Nietzsche wrote in _Ecce Homo_, "That a psychologist without equal speaks from my writings—this is perhaps the first insight gained by a good reader.... Who among the philosophers before me was in any way a psychologist? Before me there simply was no psychology." _Composing the Soul_ is the first study to pay sustained attention to this pronouncement and to examine the contours of Nietzsche's psychology in the context of his life and psychological makeup. Beginning with essays from Nietzsche's (...)
     
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  36.  12
    Frederick Olafson (1991). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Culture: A Paradox in the Will to Power. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):557-572.
    I examine Nietzsche's concept of a nihilism of strength\nand the relationship in which it stands to the kind of\nvital self-assertion that he admired in archaic\naristocracies. What is new in Nietzsche's nihilism of\nstrength is a self-awareness that was lacking in the past\nand that would enable a fully autonomous human being to\nrecognize the "being" he imposes on "becoming" as the\nexpression of his own will to power. I show that this idea\nleads to serious incoherencies in Nietzsche's account of\nthis new kind (...)
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  37.  47
    Keith Ansell-Pearson (1991). Nietzsche Contra Rousseau: A Study of Nietzsche's Moral and Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    Keith Ansell-Pearson's book is an important and very welcome contribution to a neglected area of research: Nietzsche's political thought. Nietzsche is widely regarded as a significant moral philosopher, but his political thinking has often been dismissed as either impossibly individualistic or dangerously totalitarian. Nietzsche contra Rousseau takes a serious look at Nietzsche as political thinker and relates his political ideas to the dominant traditions of modern political thought. In particular, the nature of Nietzsche's dialogue with the (...) of Jean-Jacques Rousseau is examined, in order to demonstrate Rousseau's crucial role in Nietzsche's understanding of modernity and its discontents. (shrink)
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  38. J. Harvey Lomax (ed.) (1997). Nietzsche's Philosophy of the Eternal Recurrence of the Same. University of California Press.
    This long overdue English translation of Karl Löwith's magisterial study is a major event in Nietzsche scholarship in the Anglo-American intellectual world. Its initial publication was extraordinary in itself—a dissident interpretation, written by a Jew, appearing in National Socialist Germany in 1935. Since then, Löwith's book has continued to gain recognition as one of the key texts in the German Nietzsche reception, as well as a remarkable effort to reclaim the philosopher's work from political misappropriation. For Löwith, the centerpiece of (...)
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  39.  16
    Nimrod Aloni (1989). The Three Pedagogical Dimensions of Nietzsche's Philosophy. Educational Theory 39 (4):301-306.
    In this article i present nietzsche as a counternihilistic philosopher-educator and argue that the guiding principle of his philosophy is the exploration of cultural conditions and ways of life that could lift man to higher modes of existence. i have organized the pedagogical elements of his works in terms of aim, groundwork, and example: "aiming" to liberate humanity from the state of nihilism toward healthier and nobler modes of existence, "groundwork" that is manifested in his pedagogical anthropology, and the (...)
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  40.  22
    Kelly Oliver (1994). Womanizing Nietzsche: Philosophy's Relation to the "Feminine". Routledge.
    In Womanizing Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver uses an analysis of the position of woman in Nietzsche's texts to open onto the larger question of philosophy's relation to the feminine and the maternal. Offering readings from Nietzsche, Derrida, Irigaray, Kristeva, Freud and Lacan, Oliver builds an innovative foundation for an ontology of intersubjective relationships that suggests a new approach to ethics. Oliver argues that while Freud, Nietzsche and Derrida, in particular, attempt to open up philosophy to its other--the unconscious, (...)
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  41. David K. Goodin (2013). The New Rationalism: Albert Schweitzer's Philosophy of Reverence for Life. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Albert Schweitzer preached a message of reverence for life - all life - that touched the hearts of a generation. As a medical doctor in French Equatorial Africa who selflessly helped those in need, Schweitzer was recognized with the Nobel Peace Prize in the wake of two world wars. But less than fifty years since the time of his death, the great humanitarian and scholar has faded from public awareness. In The New Rationalism, David Goodin explores the underlying philosophy (...)
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  42.  6
    Peter R. Sedgwick (2013). Nietzsche's Justice: Naturalism in Search of an Ethics. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In Nietzsche's Justice, Peter Sedgwick takes the theme of justice to the very heart of the great thinker's philosophy. He argues that Nietzsche's treatment of justice springs from an engagement with the themes charted in his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, which invokes the notion of an absolute justice grasped by way of artistic metaphysics. Nietzsche's encounter with Greek tragedy spurs the development of an oracular conception of justice capable of transcending rigid social convention. Sedgwick (...)
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  43.  15
    H. W. Siemens (1998). Nietzsche's Hammer: Philosophy, Destruction, or the Art of Limited Warfare. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 60 (2):321 - 347.
    The question posed in this paper concerns destruction: What part, if any, does destruction play in Nietzsche's life-project of critical transvaluation? Nietzsche's project, I argue, involves a total critique of Western values in the name of life, yet this does not entail total violence: the destruction of antagonistic values. Violent, destructive impulses cannot be subtracted from his thought; the question is whether they make for destruction as the goal of critique (I). Nietzsche's reflections on „critical history” are (...)
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  44.  20
    Alenka Zupancic & Steven Michels (2003). The Shortest Shadow: Nietzsche's Philosophy of the Two. Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):1-5.
    Series Foreword vii Introduction: The Event “Nietzsche” 2 I Nietzsche the Metapsychologist 30 “God Is Dead” 34 The Ascetic Ideal 46 Nihilism . . . 62 . . . as a “Crisis of Sublimation”? 72 II Noon 86 Troubles with Truth 90 From Nothingness Incorporated . . . 124 . . . via Double Affirmation . . . 132 . . . to Nothingness as Minimal Difference 150 Addendum: On Love as Comedy 164 Notes 183.
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  45.  33
    Graham Parkes (2005). Nietzsche's Environmental Philosophy: A Trans-European Perspective. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):77-91.
    Against the background of a growing interest in Nietzsche’s moral philosophy, several articles have appeared in these pages in recent years dealing with his relation to environmental ethics. While there is much here that is helpful, these essays still fail to do full justice to Nietzsche’s understanding of optimal human relations to the natural world. The context of his life helps to highlight some ecological aspects to his thinking that tend to be overlooked. His ideas about the Overhuman in (...)
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  46. Stefan Lorenz Sorgner (2007). Metaphysics Without Truth: On the Importance of Consistency Within Nietzsche's Philosophy. Marquette University Press.
  47. Peter R. Sedgwick (2013). Nietzsche's Justice: Naturalism in Search of an Ethics. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In Nietzsche's Justice, Peter Sedgwick takes the theme of justice to the very heart of the great thinker's philosophy. He argues that Nietzsche's treatment of justice springs from an engagement with the themes charted in his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, which invokes the notion of an absolute justice grasped by way of artistic metaphysics. Nietzsche's encounter with Greek tragedy spurs the development of an oracular conception of justice capable of transcending rigid social convention. Sedgwick (...)
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  48.  16
    Babette E. Babich (1994). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Science: Reflecting Science on the Ground of Art and Life. State University of New York Press.
  49.  11
    Ricardo Espinoza Lolas, Esteban Vargas & Paula Ascorra Costa (2012). Nietzsche and the concept of nature as a Body. Alpha (Osorno) 34 (34):95-116.
    Este artículo indaga en la concepción de Naturaleza del filósofo F. Nietzsche (1844-1900). Tal concepción nace en diálogo crítico con la filosofía de la época, en especial aquella que va desde el criticismo de Kant al idealismo absoluto de Hegel y que atraviesa todo un modo de ser y de comprender el mundo, Modernidad. Deallí se levanta la figura del dios griego Dioniso, como una imagen que expresa ese rasgo instantáneo de Naturalezaque se muestra plenamente como cuerpo. This article explores (...)
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  50.  15
    Amanda Dennis (2011). Dithyrambs and Ploughshares: The Cycle of Creation and Criticism in Nietzsche's Aesthetics. The European Legacy 16 (4):469 - 485.
    Pairing Thus Spoke Zarathustra with On the Genealogy of Morality foregrounds tensions between artistic creation and critical interpretation in Nietzsche's work. From The Birth of Tragedy to his genesis of the concept, Will to Power, Nietzsche describes the real, or ?what is,? in terms of a creative, form-giving force. We might therefore read Zarathustra?a linguistically experimental, richly allegorical, self-reflexive, modernist prose poem?as the pre-eminent, artistic mode of philosophical expression, at least for Nietzsche. But Zarathustra is followed by a sober (...)
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