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  1. Nigel Biggar (2013). Christian Just War Reasoning and Two Cases of Rebellion: Ireland 1916–1921 and Syria 2011–Present. Ethics and International Affairs 27 (4):393-400.
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  2. Nigel Biggar (2013). Evolutionary Biology, 'Enlightened' Anthropological Narratives, and Social Morality: A View From Christian Ethics. Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):152-157.
    The natural evolution of ethics is commonly understood in terms of the development from the selfish struggle to survive, via prudent cooperation, to altruism. However, cooperation that is prudent in the sense of serving basically selfish interests is not really altruistic. Besides, Christian ethics should not identify morality with absolutely disinterested altruism. Self-interest is only selfish when it is disproportionate or unfair; otherwise it is morally legitimate. Therefore the natural evolution of ethics is better understood as the gradual diversification of (...)
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  3. Nigel Biggar (2013). In Defence of War. Oup Oxford.
    Against the domination of moral deliberation by rights-talk In Defence of War asserts that belligerency can be morally justified, even while it is tragic and morally flawed. Recovering the early Christian tradition of just war thinking, Nigel Biggar argues in favour of aggressive war in punishment of grave injustice.
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  4. Nigel Biggar (2011). Behaving in Public: How to Do Christian Ethics. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
    Integrity, not distinctiveness -- Tense consensus -- Which public? -- Can a theological argument behave? -- So, what is the church good for? -- Conclusion: the via media: a Barthian Thomism.
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  5. Nigel Biggar (2011). Melting the Icepacks of Enmity: Forgiveness and Reconciliation in Northern Ireland. Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (2):199-209.
    The virtue of forgiveness is controversial. Christianity’s affirmation of it is unusually pronounced. Nevertheless, common experience teaches that self-preservation requires the moderation of resentment; and Christian anthropology, self-reflection and history teach that compassion for perpetrators requires it too. This inner, psychological work of forgiveness is unilateral and unconditional, and I call it ‘forgiveness as compassion’. Some of the work of forgiveness is relational, however, and this should be reciprocal and conditional, refusing to open the door to reconciliation before repentance is (...)
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  6. Nigel Biggar (2009). Not Translation, but Conversation: Theology in Public Debate About Euthanasia. In Nigel Biggar & Linda Hogan (eds.), Religious Voices in Public Places. Oup Oxford.
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  7. Nigel Biggar (2009). Saving the "Secular": The Public Vocation of Moral Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):159-178.
    The London suicide bombings of July 7, 2005 were partly the revolt of moral earnestness against a liberal society that, enchanted by the fantasy of rationalist anthropology, surrenders its passionate members to a degrading consumerism. The "humane" liberalism variously espoused by Jürgen Habermas, John Rawls, and Jeffrey Stout offers a dignifying alternative; but it is fragile, and each of its proponents looks for allies among certain kinds of religious believer. Stanley Hauerwas, however, counsels Christians against cooperation. On the one hand, (...)
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  8. Nigel Biggar & Linda Hogan (eds.) (2009). Religious Voices in Public Places. OUP Oxford.
    Must religious voices keep quiet in public places? Does fairness in a plural society require it? Must the expression of religious belief be so authoritarian as to threaten civil peace? Do we need translation into 'secular' language, or should we try to manage polyglot conversation? How neutral is 'secular' language? Is a religious argument necessarily unreasonable? What issues are specific to Islam within this exchange? -/- These are just some of the pressing questions addressed by Religious Voices in Public Places. (...)
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  9. Nigel Biggar (2008). Forgiving Enemies in Ireland. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (4):559-579.
    The Peace Process in Northern Ireland is about to reach another milestone: the Consultative Group on the Past is due to publish a report in the autumn of 2008 on "the best way to deal with the legacy of the past in Northern Ireland" and to support the building of "a shared future." It is timely therefore to think again—and further—about what political expression forgiveness might find, using the concrete case of Northern Ireland today as grist for our conceptual mill. (...)
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  10. Nigel Biggar (2007). The Value of Limited Loyalty : Christianity, the Nation, and Territorial Boundaries. In John Aloysius Coleman (ed.), Christian Political Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  11. Nigel Biggar (2004). Aiming to Kill: The Ethics of Suicide and Euthanasia. Pilgrim Press.
    1. The traditional position and the pressures for change. The Western legal tradition -- The Christian ethical hinterland -- The exceptional value of human life -- The justification of taking human life -- Suicide -- Christian ethics, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia -- The cultural pressures for change -- 2. The value of human life -- 3. The morality of acts of killing -- 4. Slippery slopes.
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  12. Nigel Biggar (2002). Peace and Justice: A Limited Reconciliation. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (2):167-179.
    This paper aims to relax the tension between the political requirements of making peace and the moral demands of doing justice, in light of the peace processes in South Africa and Northern Ireland. It begins by arguing that criminal justice should be reconceived as consisting primarily in the vindication of victims, both direct and indirect. This is not to deny the retributive punishment of perpetrators any role at all, only to insist that it be largely subservient to the goal of (...)
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  13. Nigel Biggar (1993). The Hastening That Waits: Karl Barth's Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a fresh and up-to-date account of the ethical thought of Karl Barth, one of the twentieth century's greatest theologians. In it, the author seeks to recover Barth's ethics from some widespread misunderstandings, and also presents a picture of it as a whole. Drawing on recently published sources, Biggar construes the ethics of the Church Dogmatics as it might have been had Barth lived to complete it. However, The Hastening that Waits is more than apology and description. For (...)
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  14. Nigel Biggar (1989). A Case for Casuistry in the Church. Modern Theology 6 (1):29-51.
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