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Nino Langiulli [12]Nino Francis Langiulli [1]
  1.  2
    Nino Langiulli (2006). Marxism's Strange Death. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2006 (136):177-181.
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  2. Nino Langiulli (1998). On Dick Pels' “Strange Standpoints”. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1998 (110):135-140.
    The strange thing about Dick Pels' claim about the conventional view of knowledge in “Strange Standpoints” is that, in order for knowledge to be true, it must be “value-free, disinterested and universal.” Allegedly, the challenge to this conventional view comes from “standpoint epistemologies” which, to use the opposite terms descriptive of “true knowledge,” are value-laden, interested, and particular. In short, “standpoint epistemologies” is an inflated term for what used to be and still is called subjectivism. Standpoint epistemologies are theories about (...)
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  3.  11
    Nino Langiulli (1992). Possibility, Necessity, and Existence: Abbagnano and His Predecessors. Temple University Press.
    In this systematic historical analysis, Nino Langiulli focuses on a key philosophical issue, possibility, as it is refracted through the thought of the Italian ...
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  4. Nino Langiulli (2004). 6. Two Cheers for Existentialism. Logos 7 (4).
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  5. Nino Langiulli (ed.) (1971/1981). The Existentialist Tradition: Selected Writings. Harvester Press.
     
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  6. Nino Langiulli & Bruno Martini (eds.) (2002). The Human Project: The Year 2000. Brill | Rodopi.
    This book explores human possibility at the end of the twentieth century. It takes the form of discussion between an eminent philosopher and a skilled journalist about “the human measure” as it engages false absolutes and their accompanying utopias. The book proposes a “third way” between capitalism and socialism, and it concludes with comments on end-of-century phenomena, including democracy, intellectuals, and terrorism.
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  7. Nino Langiulli (2005). The Phenomenology of Paul Piccone. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2005 (131):75-78.
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