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  1. Nir Eyal (forthcoming). Informed Consent, the Value of Trust, and Hedons. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101208.
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  2. Nir Eyal (forthcoming). Paternalism, French Fries and the Weak-Willed Witness. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  3. Ole Norheim, Samia Hurst, Nir Eyal & Dan Wikler (eds.) (forthcoming). Measuring and Evaluating Health Inequalities. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Nir Eyal (2014). Two Kinds of To-Kind Benefits and Other Reasons Why Shared Vulnerability Can Keep Clinical Studies Ethical. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (12):22-24.
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  5. Ole Fritjof Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, Alex Voorhoeve, Bonah Chitah, Richard Cookson, Norman Daniels, Nir Eyal, Walter Flores, Axel Gosseries, Daniel Hausman, Samia Hurst, Lydia Kapiriri, Toby Ord, Shlomi Segall & Frehiwot Defaye (2014). Making Fair Choices on the Path to Universal Health Coverage. World Health Organisation.
    This report by the WHO Consultative Group on Equity and Universal Health Coverage addresses how countries can make fair progress towards the goal of universal coverage. It explains the relevant tradeoffs between different desirable ends and offers guidance on how to make these tradeoffs.
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  6. Nir Eyal & Axel Gosseries (2013). Obamacare and Conscientious Objection. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1):109-117.
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  7. Daniel Wikler & Nir Eyal (2013). Nudges and Noodges: The Ethics of Health Promotion—New York Style. Public Health Ethics 6 (3):pht033.
    Michael Bloomberg's three terms in New York City's mayoral office are coming to a close. His model of governance for public health influenced cities and governments around the world. What should we make of that model? This essay introduces a symposium in which ethicists Sarah Conly, Roger Brownsword and Alex Rajczi discuss that legacy.
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  8. Nir Eyal & Till Bärnighausen (2012). Precommitting to Serve the Underserved. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):23-34.
    In many countries worldwide, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, a shortage of physicians limits the provision of lifesaving interventions. One existing strategy to increase the number of physicians in areas of critical shortage is conditioning medical school scholarships on a precommitment to work in medically underserved areas later. Current practice is usually to demand only one year of service for each year of funded studies. We show the effectiveness of scholarships conditional on such precommitment for increasing physician supplies in underserved areas. (...)
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  9. Dan Brock, Eric Cavallero, Norman Daniels, Nir Eyal, Iwao Hirose, Adi Koplovitz, Martin McIvor, David Miller, Ole Norheim & Daniel Schwartz (2011). Shlomi Segall. In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press.
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  10. Nir Eyal & Alex Voorhoeve (2011). Inequalities in HIV Care: Chances Versus Outcomes. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):42-44.
    We analyse three moral dilemmas involving resource allocation in care for HIV-positive patients. Ole Norheim and Kjell Arne Johansson have argued that these cases reveal a tension between egalitarian concerns and concerns for better population health. We argue, by contrast, that these cases reveal a tension between, on the one hand, a concern for equal *chances*, and, on the other hand, both a concern for better health and an egalitarian concern for equal *outcomes*. We conclude that, in these cases, there (...)
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  11. Nir Eyal & Neema Sofaer (2010). The Diverse Ethics of Translational Research. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):19-30.
    Commentators on the ethics of translational research find it morally problematic. Types of translational research are said to involve questionable benefits, special risks, additional barriers to informed consent, and severe conflicts of interest. Translational research conducted on the global poor is thought to exploit them and increase international disparities. Some commentators support especially stringent ethical review. However, such concerns are grounded only in pre-approval translational research (now called T1 ). Whether or not T1 has these features, translational research beyond approval (...)
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  12. Nir Eyal & Neema Sofaer (2010). Translational Research Beyond Approval: A Two-Stage Ethics Review. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):W1-W3.
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  13. Neema Sofaer & Nir Eyal (2010). Translational Research Beyond Approval: A Two-Stage Ethics Review. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):W1-W3.
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  14. Nir Eyal (2009). Is the Body Special? Review of Cécile Fabre, Whose Body is It Anyway? Justice and the Integrity of the Person. Utilitas 21 (2):233-245.
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  15. Nir Eyal & Samia A. Hurst (2008). Physician Brain Drain: Can Nothing Be Done? Public Health Ethics 1 (2):180-192.
    Next SectionAccess to medicines, vaccination and care in resource-poor settings is threatened by the emigration of physicians and other health workers. In entire regions of the developing world, low physician density exacerbates child and maternal mortality and hinders treatment of HIV/AIDS. This article invites philosophers to help identify ethical and effective responses to medical brain drain. It reviews existing proposals and their limitations. It makes a case that, in resource-poor countries, ’locally relevant medical training’—teaching primarily locally endemic diseases and practice (...)
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  16. Nir Eyal (2008). What is It Like to Be a Bird? : Wikler and Brock on the Ethics of Population Health. In Ronald Michael Green, Aine Donovan & Steven A. Jauss (eds.), Global Bioethics: Issues of Conscience for the Twenty-First Century. Oxford University Press.
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  17. Nir Eyal (2007). Poverty : Poverty-Reduction, Incentives, and the Brighter Side of False Needs. In Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  18. Nir Eyal (2006). Egalitarian Justice and Innocent Choice. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 2 (1).
    This article argues that, in its standard formulation, luck-egalitarianism is false. In particular, I show that disadvantages that result from perfectly free choice can constitute egalitarian injustice. I also propose a modified formulation of luck-egalitarianism that would withstand my criticism. One merit of the modification is that it helps us to reconcile widespread intuitions about distributive justice with equally widespread intuitions about punitive justice.
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  19. Nir Eyal (2005). Justice, Luck, and Knowledge, by Susan L. Hurley. Harvard University Press, 2003. VIII + 341 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 21 (1):164-171.
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  20. Nir Eyal (2005). ‘Perhaps the Most Important Primary Good’: Self-Respect and Rawls’s Principles of Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (2):195-219.
    The article begins by reconstructing the just distribution of the social bases of self-respect, a principle of justice that is covert in Rawls’s writing. I argue that, for Rawls, justice mandates that each social basis for self-respect be equalized (and, as a second priority, maximized). Curiously, for Rawls, that principle ranks higher than Rawls’s two more famous principles of justice - equal liberty and the difference principle. I then recall Rawls’s well-known confusion between self-respect and another form of self-appraisal, namely, (...)
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