Search results for 'Noah Leah Henderson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Leah Henderson, Noah D. Goodman, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & James F. Woodward (2010). The Structure and Dynamics of Scientific Theories: A Hierarchical Bayesian Perspective. Philosophy of Science 77 (2):172-200.score: 810.0
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  2. Denis M. Walsh, Leah Henderson, Noah D. Goodman, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, James F. Woodward, Hannes Leitgeb, Richard Pettigrew, Brad Weslake & John Kulvicki (2010). 1. Not a Sure Thing: Fitness, Probability, and Causation Not a Sure Thing: Fitness, Probability, and Causation (Pp. 147-171). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 77 (2).score: 810.0
     
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  3. Leah Henderson (2003). The Von Neumann Entropy: A Reply to Shenker. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):291-296.score: 240.0
    Shenker has claimed that Von Neumann's argument for identifying the quantum mechanical entropy with the Von Neumann entropy, S() = – ktr( log ), is invalid. Her claim rests on a misunderstanding of the idea of a quantum mechanical pure state. I demonstrate this, and provide a further explanation of Von Neumann's argument.
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  4. Leah Henderson (2014). Can the Second Law Be Compatible with Time Reversal Invariant Dynamics? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 47:90-98.score: 240.0
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  5. Leah Henderson (2002). Measuring Quantum Entanglement. In. In T. Placek & J. Butterfield (eds.), Non-Locality and Modality. Kluwer. 137--152.score: 240.0
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  6. Richard Cleve, Artur Ekert, Leah Henderson, Chiara Macchiavello & Michele Mosca (1998). On Quantum Algorithms. Complexity 4 (1):33-42.score: 240.0
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  7. Noah Leah Henderson, Joshua D. Goodman, James B. Tenenbaum & F. Woodward (2010). The Structure and Dynamics of Scientific Theories: A Hierarchical Bayesian Perspective. Philosophy of Science 77 (2).score: 129.0
    Hierarchical Bayesian models (HBMs) provide an account of Bayesian inference in a hierarchically structured hypothesis space. Scientific theories are plausibly regarded as organized into hierarchies in many cases, with higher levels sometimes called ‘paradigms’ and lower levels encoding more specific or concrete hypotheses. Therefore, HBMs provide a useful model for scientific theory change, showing how higher‐level theory change may be driven by the impact of evidence on lower levels. HBMs capture features described in the Kuhnian tradition, particularly the idea that (...)
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  8. David Henderson, Terry Horgan & Matjaž Potrč (2007). Transglobal Evidentialism-Reliabilism. Acta Analytica 22 (4):281-300.score: 60.0
    We propose an approach to epistemic justification that incorporates elements of both reliabilism and evidentialism, while also transforming these elements in significant ways. After briefly describing and motivating the non-standard version of reliabilism that Henderson and Horgan call “transglobal” reliabilism, we harness some of Henderson and Horgan’s conceptual machinery to provide a non-reliabilist account of propositional justification (i.e., evidential support). We then invoke this account, together with the notion of a transglobally reliable belief-forming process, to give an account (...)
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  9. David K. Henderson & Terence Horgan (2011). The Epistemological Spectrum: At the Interface of Cognitive Science and Conceptual Analysis. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    David Henderson and Terence Horgan set out a broad new approach to epistemology, which they see as a mixed discipline, having both a priori and empirical elements. They defend the roles of a priori reflection and conceptual analysis in philosophy, but their revisionary account of these philosophical methods allows them a subtle but essential empirical dimension. They espouse a dual-perspective position which they call iceberg epistemology, respecting the important differences between epistemic processes that are consciously accessible and those that (...)
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  10. Martha Henderson (2012). Franck L. B. Meijboom: Problems of Trust: A Question of Trustworthiness. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (1):107-109.score: 60.0
    Franck L. B. Meijboom: Problems of Trust: A Question of Trustworthiness Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9300-4 Authors Martha L. Henderson, Master of Environmental Studies Program, The Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA 98505, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  11. David Henderson, Comments Are Welcome.score: 60.0
    Contemporary accounts of what it is for an agent to be justified in holding a given belief commonly carry substantive commitments concerning what cognitive processes can and should be like. In this paper, we argue that concern for the plausiblity of such psychological commitments leads to significant epistemological results. In particular, it leads to a multi-faceted epistemology in which elements of traditionally conflicting epistemologies are vindicated within a single epistemological account. We suggest thinking of the epistemologically relevant cognitive processes in (...)
     
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  12. David Henderson & Terry Horgan (2001). The A Priori Isn’T All That It Is Cracked Up to Be, But It Is Something. Philosophical Topics 29 (1/2):219-250.score: 30.0
    Alvin Goldman’s contributions to contemporary epistemology are impressive—few epistemologists have provided others so many occasions for reflecting on the fundamental character of their discipline and its concepts. His work has informed the way epistemological questions have changed (and remained consistent) over the last two decades. We (the authors of this paper) can perhaps best suggest our indebtedness by noting that there is probably no paper on epistemology that either of us individually or jointly have produced that does not in its (...)
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  13. David Henderson (2010). Explanation and Rationality Naturalized. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (1):30-58.score: 30.0
    Familiar accounts have it that one explains thoughts or actions by showing them to be rational. It is common to find that the standards of rationality presupposed in these accounts are drawn from what would be thought to be aprioristic sources. I advance an argument to show this must be mistaken. But, recent work in epistemology and on rationality takes a less aprioristic approach to such standards. Does the new (psychological or cognitive scientific) realism in accounts of rationality itself significantly (...)
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  14. David K. Henderson (1987). The Principle of Charity and the Problem of Irrationality (Translation and the Problem of Irrationality). Synthese 73 (2):225 - 252.score: 30.0
    Common formulations of the principle of charity in translation seem to undermine attributions of irrationality in social scientific accounts that are otherwise unexceptionable. This I call the problem of irrationality. Here I resolve the problem of irrationality by developing two complementary views of the principle of charity. First, I develop the view (ill-developed in the literature at present) that the principle of charity is preparatory, being needed in the construction of provisional first-approximation translation manuals. These serve as the basis for (...)
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  15. David Henderson (2000). What Is a Priori and What Is It Good For? Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (S1):51-86.score: 30.0
    The doctrine is familiar. In a sentence, a priori truths are those that are knowable on the basis of reflection alone (independent of experience) by anyone who has acquired the relevant concepts. This expresses the classical conception of the a priori. Of course, there are those who despair of finding any truths that fully meet these demands. Some of the doubters are convinced, however, that the demands, are somewhat inflated by an epistemological tradition that was nevertheless on to something of (...)
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  16. Terence E. Horgan & David K. Henderson (2005). What Does It Take to Be a True Believer? Against the Opulent Ideology of Eliminative Materialism. In Mind as a Scientific Object. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
               Eliminative materialism, as William Lycan (this volume) tells us, is materialism plus the claim that no creature has ever had a belief, desire, intention, hope, wish, or other “folk-psychological†state. Some contemporary philosophers claim that eliminative materialism is very likely true. They sketch certain potential scenarios, for the way theory might develop in cognitive science and neuroscience, that they claim are fairly likely; and they maintain that if such scenarios (...)
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  17. George L. Henderson & Marvin Waterstone (eds.) (2009). Geographic Thought : A Praxis Perspective. Routledge.score: 30.0
    For researchers and students interested in the connections between theoretically informed work and the possibilities for bettering people's everyday lives, this ...
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  18. T. Y. Henderson (1970). In Defense of Thrasymachus. American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (3):218 - 228.score: 30.0
    An interpretation is offered of thrasymachus' account of the nature of justice and just action in book I of the 'republic' which is internally consistent throughout on all important points. Just action is not defined in terms of its practical consequences, As many commentators assume, But rather in terms of its logical consequences 'vis-A-Vis' just agents. When one man acts justly towards another, The performance of the just act renders the just agent vulnerable to unfair or unjust exploitation by those (...)
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  19. David Henderson (1988). The Importance of Explanation in Quine's Principle of Charity in Translation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):355-369.score: 30.0
  20. Michele C. Henderson, M. Gregory Oakes & Marilyn Smith (2009). What Plato Knew About Enron. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):463 - 471.score: 30.0
    This paper applies Plato’s cave allegory to Enron’s success and downfall. Plato’s famous tale of cave dwellers illustrates the different levels of truth and understanding. These levels include images, the sources of images, and the ultimate reality behind both. The paper first describes these levels of perception as they apply to Plato’s cave dwellers and then provides a brief history of the rise of Enron. Then we apply Plato’s levels of understanding to Enron, showing how the company created its image (...)
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  21. Sanford Goldberg & David Henderson (2006). Monitoring and Anti-Reductionism in the Epistemology of Testimony. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):600 - 617.score: 30.0
    One of the central points of contention in the epistemology of testimony concerns the uniqueness (or not) of the justification of beliefs formed through testimony--whether such justification can be accounted for in terms of, or 'reduced to,' other familiar sort of justification, e.g. without relying on any epistemic principles unique to testimony. One influential argument for the reductionist position, found in the work of Elizabeth Fricker, argues by appeal to the need for the hearer to monitor the testimony for credibility. (...)
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  22. L. Henderson (forthcoming). Bayesianism and Inference to the Best Explanation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axt020.score: 30.0
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  23. David Henderson & Terence E. Horgan (2001). Practicing Safe Epistemology. Philosophical Studies 102 (3):227 - 258.score: 30.0
    Reliablists have argued that the important evaluative epistemic concept of being justified in holding a belief, at least to the extent that that concept is associated with knowledge, is best understood as concerned with the objective appropriateness of the processes by which a given belief is generated and sustained. In particular, they hold that a belief is justified only when it is fostered by processes that are reliable (at least minimally so) in the believer’s actual world.[1] Of course, reliablists typically (...)
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  24. Kathleen R. Kesson & James G. Henderson (2010). Reconceptualizing Professional Development for Curriculum Leadership: Inspired by John Dewey and Informed by Alain Badiou. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (2):213-229.score: 30.0
    Almost a hundred years ago, John Dewey clarified the relationship between democracy and education. However, the enactment of a 'deeply democratic' educational practice has proven elusive throughout the ensuing century, overridden by managerial approaches to schooling young people and to the standardized, technical preparation and professional development of teachers and educational leaders. A powerful counter-narrative to this 'standardized management paradigm' exists in the field of curriculum studies, but is largely ignored by mainstream approaches to the professional development of educators. This (...)
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  25. David Henderson (2002). Norms, Normative Principles, and Explanation: On Not Getting is From Ought. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (3):329-364.score: 30.0
    It seems that hope springs eternal for the cherished idea that norms (or normativeprinciples) explain actions or regularities in actions. But it also seems thatthere are many ways of going wrong when taking norms and normative principlesas explanatory. The author argues that neither norms nor normative principles—insofar as they are the sort of things with normative force—is explanatoryof what is done. He considers the matter using both erotetic and ontic models ofexplanation. He further considers various understandings of norms. Key Words: (...)
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  26. David Henderson (2009). Motivated Contextualism. Philosophical Studies 142 (1):119 - 131.score: 30.0
    The concept of knowledge is used to certify epistemic agents as good sources (on a certain point or subject matter) for an understood audience. Attributions of knowledge and denials of knowledge are used in a kind of epistemic gate keeping for (epistemic or practical) communities with which the attributor and interlocutors are associated. When combined with reflection on kinds of practical and epistemic communities, and their situated epistemic needs for gate keeping, this simple observation regarding the point and purpose of (...)
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  27. David K. Henderson (1994). Epistemic Competence and Contextualist Epistemology: Why Contextualism is Not Just the Poor Person's Coherentism. Journal of Philosophy 91 (12):627-649.score: 30.0
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  28. David Henderson (2008). Testimonial Beliefs and Epistemic Competence. Noûs 42 (2):190–221.score: 30.0
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  29. Mary M. Brabeck, Lauren A. Rogers, Selcuk Sirin, Jennifer Henderson, Michael Benvenuto, Monica Weaver & Kathleen Ting (2000). Increasing Ethical Sensitivity to Racial and Gender Intolerance in Schools: Development of the Racial Ethical Sensitivity Test. Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):119 – 137.score: 30.0
    This article is an attempt to develop a measure of ethical sensitivity to racial and gender intolerance that occurs in schools. Acts of intolerance that indicate ethically insensitive behaviors in American schools were identified and tied to existing professional ethical codes developed by school-based professional organizations. The Racial Ethical Sensitivity Test (REST) consists of 5 scenarios that portray acts of racial intolerance and ethical insensitivity. Participants viewed 2 videotaped scenarios and then responded to a semistructured interview protocol adapted from Bebeau (...)
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  30. David K. Henderson (1990). An Empirical Basis for Charity in Interpretation. Erkenntnis 32 (1):83 - 103.score: 30.0
    In codifying the methods of translation, several writers have formulated maxims that would constrain interpreters to construe their subjects as (more or less) rational speakers of the truth. Such maxims have come to be known as versions of the principle of charity. W. V. O. Quine suggests an empirical, not purely methodological, basis for his version of that principle. Recently, Stephen Stich has criticized Quine's attempt to found the principle of charity in translation on information about the probabilities of various (...)
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  31. David K. Henderson (1994). Account for Macro-Level Causation. Synthese 101 (2):129-156.score: 30.0
    By a macro-level feature, I understand any feature that supervenes on, and is thus realized in, lower-level features. Recent discussions by Kim have suggested that such features cannot be causally relevant insofar as they are not classically reducible to lower-level features. This seems to render macro-level features causally irrelevant. I defend the causal relevance of some such features. Such features have been thought causally relevant in many examples that have underpinned philosophical work on causality. Additionally, in certain typical biological cases, (...)
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  32. David Henderson & Terence Horgan (2000). Iceberg Epistemology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):497-535.score: 30.0
    Accounts of what it is for an agent to be justified in holding a belief commonly carry commitments concerning what cognitive processes can and should be like. A concern for the plausibility of such commitments leads to a multi-faceted epistemology in which elements of traditionally conflicting epistemologies are vindicated within a single epistemological account. The accessible and articulable states that have been the exclusive focus of much epistemology must constitute only a proper subset of epistemologically relevant processing. The interaction of (...)
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  33. David Henderson (2011). Lets Be Flexible: Our Interpretive/Explanatory Toolbox, or In Praise of Using a Range of Tools. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (2):261-299.score: 30.0
    This paper explores the role and limits of cognitive simulation in understanding or explaining others. In simulation, one puts one's own cognitive processes to work on pretend input similar to that one supposes that the other plausibly had. Such a process is highly useful. However, it is also limited in important ways. Several limitations fall out from the various forms of cognitive diversity. Some of this diversity results from cultural differences, or from differences in individuals' cognitive biographies. Such diversity is (...)
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  34. David Henderson (2003). Review of Martin Kusch, Knowledge by Agreement: The Programme of Communitarian Epistemology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (1).score: 30.0
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  35. G. P. Henderson (1966). Ought" Implies "Can. Philosophy 41 (156):101 - 112.score: 30.0
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  36. David K. Henderson (1991). On the Testability of Psychological Generalizations (Psychological Testability). Philosophy of Science (December) 586 (December):586-606.score: 30.0
    Rosenberg argues that intentional generalizations in the human sciences cannot be law-like because they are not amenable to significant empirical refinement. This irrefinability is said to result from the principle that supposedly controls in intentional explanation also serving as the standard for successful interpretation. The only credible evidence bearing on such a principle would then need conform to it. I argue that psychological generalizations are refinable and can be nomic. I show how empirical refinement of psychological generalizations is possible by (...)
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  37. Peter Alexander, A. J. Ayer, P. F. Strawson, G. P. Henderson, John M. Hems, Roy Harris, Anthony Kenny, Ninian Smart, K. C. Barclay, Mary Hesse & A. C. Lloyd (1966). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 75 (182):442-461.score: 30.0
  38. G. P. Henderson (1966). The Concept of Ugliness. British Journal of Aesthetics 6 (3):219-229.score: 30.0
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  39. Mike J. Henderson (1997). Ethical Outsourcing in UK Financial Services: Employee Rights. Business Ethics 6 (2):110–124.score: 30.0
  40. David K. Henderson (1995). One Naturalized Epistemological Argument Against Coherentist Accounts of Empirical Knowledge. Erkenntnis 43 (2):199 - 227.score: 30.0
    The argument I present here is an example of the manner in which naturalizing epistemology can help address fairly traditional epistemological issues. I develop one argument against coherentist epistemologies of empirical knowledge. In doing so, I draw on BonJour (1985), for that account seems to me to indicate the direction in which any plausible coherentist account would need to be developed, at least insofar as such accounts are to conceive of justification in terms of an agent (minimally) possessing articul able (...)
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  41. Lisa Henderson (1991). A Selected Annotated Bibliography on Image Ethics. In Larry Gross, John Stuart Katz & Jay Ruby (eds.), Image Ethics: The Moral Rights of Subjects in Photographs, Film, and Television. Oup Usa. 273.score: 30.0
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  42. David K. Henderson (1996). Simulation Theory Versus Theory Theory: A Difference Without a Difference in Explanations. Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (S1):65-93.score: 30.0
  43. A. A. R. Henderson (1980). Notes on the Text of Ovid's Remedia Amoris. Classical Quarterly 30 (01):159-.score: 30.0
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  44. Verne E. Henderson (1984). The Spectrum of Ethicality. Journal of Business Ethics 3 (2):163 - 171.score: 30.0
    Business ethics is the continuing process of re-defining the goals and rules of business activity. In times of rapid change, spurred equally by technological innovation within the business community and by societal expectations in the larger community, participants who share in that process of re-defining goals and rules should be sensitive to professional differences. Lawyers and executives, for instance, while seeking a common societal good, will utilize measurably different goals and methods based on differences in leadership style, accountability to constituents (...)
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  45. David K. Henderson (1987). Winch and the Constraints on Interpretation: Versions of the Principle of Charity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):153-173.score: 30.0
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  46. Jennifer Jacobs Henderson (2007). What the West Wing Tells Us. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 22 (2 & 3):229 – 231.score: 30.0
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  47. Scott Anderbois, Adrian Brasoveanu & Robert Henderson (2013). At-Issue Proposals and Appositive Impositions in Discourse. Journal of Semantics:fft014.score: 30.0
    Potts (2005) and many subsequent works have argued that the semantic content of appositive (non-restrictive) relative clauses, e.g., the underlined material in John, who nearly killed a woman with his car, visited her in the hospital, must be in some way separate from the content of the rest of the sentence, i.e., from at-issue content. At the same time, there is mounting evidence from various anaphoric processes that the two kinds of content must be integrated into a single, incrementally evolving (...)
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  48. David Henderson (2012). Neuraths Boat Will Take You Where You Want to Go: On Naturalized Epistemology and Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (3):389-414.score: 30.0
    Naturalized epistemology is not a recent invention, nor is it a philosophical invention. Rather, it is a cognitive phenomena that is pervasive and desirable in the way of human epistemic engagement with their world. It is a matter of the way that one’s cognitive processes can be modulated by information gotten from those same or wider cognitive processes. Such modulational control enhances the reliability of one’s cognitive processes in many ways ‐ and judgments about objective epistemic justification consistently evince a (...)
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  49. G. P. Henderson (1956). Fact, Fiction, and Forecast. Philosophical Quarterly 6 (24):266-272.score: 30.0
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  50. Thomas G. Henderson (1953). Santayana Awaiting Death. Journal of Philosophy 50 (7):201-206.score: 30.0
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