Search results for 'Noble savage' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Steven A. LeBlanc (2003). Constant Battles: The Myth of the Peaceful, Noble Savage. St. Martin's Press.score: 240.0
    With armed conflict in the Persian Gulf now upon us, Harvard archaeologist Steven LeBlanc takes a long-term view of the nature and roots of war, presenting a controversial thesis: The notion of the "noble savage" living in peace with one another and in harmony with nature is a fantasy. In Constant Battles: The Myth of the Peaceful, Noble Savage , LeBlanc contends that warfare and violent conflict have existed throughout human history, and that humans have never (...)
     
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  2. Douglas J. Buege (1996). The Ecologically Noble Savage Revisited. Environmental Ethics 18 (1):71-88.score: 180.0
    The stereotype of the “ecologically noble savage” is still prevalent in European-American discourses. I examine the empirical justifications offered for this stereotype, concluding that we lack sound empirical grounds for believing in “ecological nobility.” I argue that the stereotype should be abandoned because it has negative consequences for native peoples. Instead of accepting questionable stereotypes, philosophers and others should focus on the lives of particular peoples in order to understand their philosophies as well as the relationships that they (...)
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  3. Sandy Marie Anglás Grande (1999). Beyond the Ecologically Noble Savage: Deconstructing the White Man's Indian. Environmental Ethics 21 (3):307-320.score: 180.0
    I examine the implications of stereotyping and its intersections with the political realities facing American Indian communities. Specifically, I examine the typification of Indian as ecologically noble savage, as both employed and refuted by environmentalists, through the lenses of cognitive and social psychological perspectives and then bring it within the context of a broader cultural critique. I argue that the noble savage stereotype, often used to promote the environmentalist agenda is nonetheless immersed in the political and (...)
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  4. Sandy Marie Anglás Grande (1999). Beyond the Ecologically Noble Savage. Environmental Ethics 21 (3):307-320.score: 180.0
    I examine the implications of stereotyping and its intersections with the political realities facing American Indian communities. Specifically, I examine the typification of Indian as ecologically noble savage, as both employed and refuted by environmentalists, through the lenses of cognitive and social psychological perspectives and then bring it within the context of a broader cultural critique. I argue that the noble savage stereotype, often used to promote the environmentalist agenda is nonetheless immersed in the political and (...)
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  5. Rune Graulund (2009). From (B)Edouin to (A)Borigine: The Myth of the Desert Noble Savage. History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):79-104.score: 180.0
    This article examines the myth of the supposed superiority of the desert noble savage over civilized man. With the Bedouin of Arabia and the Aborigines of Australia as its two prime examples, the article argues that two versions of this myth can be traced: one in which the desert noble savage is valorized due to his valour, physical prowess and martial skill (Bedouin); and another, later version, where the desert noble savage is valorized as (...)
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  6. Douglas D. Noble (1992). References for Noble (From Page 11). Inquiry 9 (1):23-23.score: 180.0
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  7. Christopher Kelly (1992). Book Review:Jean-Jacques. Maurice Cranston; The Noble Savage. Maurice Cranston. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (1):167-.score: 150.0
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  8. A. W. Gomme (1936). The Noble Savage A. O. Lovejoy and G. Boas: Primitivism and Related Ideas in Antiquity. With Supplementary Papers by W. F. Allright and P.-E. Dumont. Pp. Xiii + 482. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press (London: Milford), 1935. Cloth, $5 or 22s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (02):77-78.score: 150.0
  9. Allan W. Larsen (1995). The Noble Savage: Jean-Jacques Rousseau 1754–1762. History of European Ideas 21 (1):134-135.score: 150.0
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  10. Harvey Chisick (1994). Maurice Cranston., Jean-Jacques and The Noble Savage. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (4):117-118.score: 150.0
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  11. Alan Dangour (2003). The Myth of the Noble Savage. By Ter Ellingson. Pp. 467. (University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA, 2001.) £15.95, ISBN 0-520-22610-0, Paperback. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 35 (1):153-160.score: 150.0
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  12. Christopher Fox (1995). Introduction: How to Prepare a Noble Savage: The Spectacle of Human Science. In C. Fox, R. Porter & R. Wokler (eds.), Inventing Human Science. University of California Press. 1--30.score: 150.0
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  13. L. Lewis Wall (1996). The Noble Savage in Labor; or, Claude Levi-Strauss Has a Baby. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 40 (1):33-44.score: 150.0
     
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  14. Stephen Duguid (2010). Nature in Modernity: Servant, Citizen, Queen or Comrade. Peter Lang.score: 60.0
    This is explored in a series of chapters that focus on our hunter-gatherer heritage, the shift to a more sedentary and agricultural life and the subsequent ...
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  15. Denis Noble (2008). The Music of Life: Biology Beyond Genes. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    What is Life? Decades of research have resulted in the full mapping of the human genome - three billion pairs of code whose functions are only now being understood. The gene's eye view of life, advocated by evolutionary biology, sees living bodies as mere vehicles for the replication of the genetic codes. But for a physiologist, working with the living organism, the view is a very different one. Denis Noble is a world renowned physiologist, and sets out an alternative (...)
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  16. Denis Noble (2006). The Music of Life: Biology Beyond the Genome. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    What is Life? Decades of research have resulted in the full mapping of the human genome - three billion pairs of code whose functions are only now being understood. The gene's eye view of life, advocated by evolutionary biology, sees living bodies as mere vehicles for the replication of the genetic codes. -/- But for a physiologist, working with the living organism, the view is a very different one. Denis Noble is a world renowned physiologist, and sets out an (...)
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  17. David Allen Harvey (2012). The French Enlightenment and its Others: The Mandarin, the Savage, and the Invention of the Human Sciences. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    Philosophy in the Seraglio -- The wisdom of the East -- The New World and the noble savage -- The last frontiers -- The varieties of man -- An indelible stain -- The apotheosis of Europe.
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  18. Michael Clifford (2001). Political Genealogy After Foucault: Savage Identities. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Combining the most powerful elements of Foucault's theories, Clifford produces a methodology for cultural and political critique called "political genealogy" to explore the genesis of modern political identity. At the core of American identity, Clifford argues, is the ideal of the "Savage Noble," a hybrid that married the Native American "savage" with the "civilized" European male. This complex icon animates modern politics, and has shaped our understandings of rights, freedom, and power.
     
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  19. Heidi Savage, Four Problems with Empty Names.score: 30.0
    Empty names vary in their referential features. Some of them, as Kripke argues, are necessarily empty -- those that are used to create works of fiction. Others appear to be contingently empty -- those which fail to refer at this world, but which do uniquely identify particular objects in other possible worlds. I argue against Kripke's metaphysical and semantic reasons for thinking that either some or all empty names are necessarily non-referring, because these reasons are either not the right reasons (...)
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  20. Heidi Savage, What Matters in Survival: Life Trajectories and the Possibility of Virtual Immersion.score: 30.0
    The immediate goal of this paper is to establish that one can both agree with Parfit that identity is not what matters in survival and yet still maintain that the concept of a persisting person requires singularity over time. That is, fission cannot preserve what matters in survival. This can be maintained once one recognizes an externalist constraint on preserving what matters. Specifically, I claim that what matters in the survival of persons is something Parfit might call the “quasi-continuation” of (...)
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  21. Heidi Savage, Descriptive Names and Shifty Characters: A Context-Sensitive Account.score: 30.0
    Standard rigid designator accounts of a name’s meaning have trouble accommodating what I will call a descriptive name’s “shifty” character -- its tendency to shift its referent over time in response to a discovery that the conventional referent of that name does not satisfy the description with which that name was introduced. I offer a variant of Kripke’s historical semantic theory of how names function, a variant that can accommodate the character of descriptive names while maintaining rigidity for proper names. (...)
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  22. C. Wade Savage (1967). The Paradox of the Stone. Philosophical Review 76 (1):74-79.score: 30.0
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  23. Heidi Savage, Literal Truth and the Habits of Sherlock Holmes.score: 30.0
    Because names from fiction, names like ‘Sherlock Holmes’, fail to refer, and because it has been supposed that all simple predicative sentences including a sentence like ‘Sherlock Holmes smokes’ will be true if and only if the referent of the name has the property encoded by the predicate, many philosophers have denied that the sentence or an utterance of the sentence ‘Sherlock Holmes smokes’ could be true, or at least, it cannot be true taken at face value. Despite this, natural (...)
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  24. Heidi Savage, On Being Called Names.score: 30.0
    A recent defence of analyzing names as predicates that relies on a calling relation to explain their meanings,an account developed by Fara, is claimed to escape the problems afflicting standard meta-linguistic analyses. For Fara, this is because the calling relation itself is not essentially meta-linguistic; there are attributive uses of the calling relation as well. Distinguishing between meta-linguistic and attributive notions of calling is supposed to disperse with the common objection to calling accounts, specifically, Kripke's objection that these kinds of (...)
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  25. Heidi Savage, (Public Address) No Means No: Feminist and Victim Understandings of Sexual Assault Awareness.score: 30.0
    While there are many different motivations for raising questions about the Sexual Assault Awareness Movement, at least one motivation comes from feminist controversies about what counts as consensual sex. Historically, this controversy arose between those known as "anti-pornography feminists", and "sex positive feminists" whose proponents had very different understandings of what counts as sexual autonomy for women. It is important to understand that questioning the current definitions of what counts as an instance of sexual assault does not entail an anti-feminist (...)
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  26. Roger W. H. Savage (1993). Aesthetic Criticism and the Poetics of Modern Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (2):142-151.score: 30.0
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  27. Leonard J. Savage (1954). The Foundations of Statistics. Wiley Publications in Statistics.score: 30.0
    Classic analysis of the subject and the development of personal probability; one of the greatest controversies in modern statistcal thought.
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  28. Manuel de Pinedo-Garcia & Jason Noble (2008). Beyond Persons: Extending the Personal/Subpersonal Distinction to Non-Rational Animals and Artificial Agents. Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):87-100.score: 30.0
    The distinction between personal level explanations and subpersonal ones has been subject to much debate in philosophy. We understand it as one between explanations that focus on an agent’s interaction with its environment, and explanations that focus on the physical or computational enabling conditions of such an interaction. The distinction, understood this way, is necessary for a complete account of any agent, rational or not, biological or artificial. In particular, we review some recent research in Artificial Life that pretends to (...)
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  29. Michael K. Green (1993). Images of Native Americans in Advertising: Some Moral Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (4):323 - 330.score: 30.0
    Images of Native Americans and of aspects of Native American culture are common in advertisements in the United States. Three such images can be distinguished — the Noble Savage, the Civilizable Savage and the Bloodthirsty Savage images. The aim of this paper is to argue that the use of such images is not morally acceptable because these images depend upon an underlying conception of Native Americans that denies that they are human beings. By so doing, it (...)
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  30. Heidi Savage, Kypris, Aphrodite, and Venus: Another Puzzle About Belief.score: 30.0
    My aim in this paper is to show that the existence of empty names raise problems for the Millian that go beyond the traditional problems of accounting for their meanings. Specifically, they have implications for Millian strategies for dealing with puzzles about belief. The standard move of positing a referent for a fictional name to avoid the problem of meaning, because of its distinctly Millian motivation, implies that solving puzzles about belief, when they involve empty names, do in fact hang (...)
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  31. Manuel de Pinedo & Jason Noble, Beyond Persons: Extending the Personal / Subpersonal Distinction to Non-Rational Animals and Artificial Agents.score: 30.0
    The distinction between personal level explanations and subpersonal ones has been subject to much debate in philosophy. We understand it as one between explanations that focus on an agent’s interaction with its environment, and explanations that focus on the physical or computational enabling conditions of such an interaction. The distinction, understood this way, is necessary for a complete account of any agent, rational or not, biological or artificial. In particular, we review some recent research in Artificial Life that pretends to (...)
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  32. C. Wade Savage (2001). In Defense of Color Psychophysicalism. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):125-132.score: 30.0
  33. C. Wade Savage & C. Anthony Anderson (eds.) (1989). Rereading Russell: Essays in Bertrand Russell's Metaphysics and Epistemology. University of Minnesota Press.score: 30.0
    In a well- known barb, CD Broad said: "Mr. Bertrand Russell produces a new system of philosophy each year or so, and Mr. GE Moore none ...
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  34. Charles Auffray & Denis Noble (2011). Scale Relativity: An Extended Paradigm for Physics and Biology? [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 16 (4):303-305.score: 30.0
    With scale relativity theory, Laurent Nottale has provided a powerful conceptual and mathematical framework with numerous validated predictions that has fundamental implications and applications for all sciences. We discuss how this extended framework reviewed in Nottale (Found Sci 152 (3):101–152, 2010a ) may help facilitating integration across multiple size and time frames in systems biology, and the development of a scale relative biology with increased explanatory power.
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  35. Roger W. H. Savage (2005). Criticism, Imagination, and the Subjectivation of Aesthetics. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):164-179.score: 30.0
  36. Joanne Savage & Satoshi Kanazawa (2004). Social Capital and the Human Psyche: Why is Social Life "Capital"? Sociological Theory 22 (3):504-524.score: 30.0
    In this article, we propose a revised definition of social capital, premised on the principles of evolutionary psychology. We define social capital as any feature of a social relationship that, directly or indirectly, confers reproductive benefits to a participant in that relationship. This definition grounds the construct of social capital in human nature by providing a basis for inferring the underlying motivations that humans may have in common, rather than leaving the matter of what humans use capital for unspoken. Discussions (...)
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  37. Wiliam G. Noble (1981). Gibsonian Theory and the Pragmatist Perspective. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 11 (1):65–85.score: 30.0
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  38. W. Noble (2002). The Origins of Complex Language. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2):249 – 250.score: 30.0
    Book Information The origins of complex language. By Carstairs-McCarthy Andrew. Oxford University Press. Oxford. 1999. Pp. vi + 260.
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  39. Jennifer S. Savage, Jennifer Orlet Fisher & Leann L. Birch (2007). Parental Influence on Eating Behavior: Conception to Adolescence. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):22-34.score: 30.0
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  40. C. Wade Savage (ed.) (1990). Scientific Theories. University of Minnesota Press.score: 30.0
    Churchland proposes a radically new way of representing theories and their acquisition in the terms of connectionist neuro- science. ...
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  41. Paul R. Noble (1996). Fish and the Bible: Should Reader-Response Theories 'Catch On'? Heythrop Journal 37 (4):456–467.score: 30.0
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  42. Leonard J. Savage (1967). Difficulties in the Theory of Personal Probability. Philosophy of Science 34 (4):305-310.score: 30.0
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  43. William J. Baumol, Robert E. Litan, Martin E. Cave, Peter Cramton, Robert W. Hahn, Thomas W. Hazlett, Paul L. Joskow, Alfred E. Kahn, John W. Mayo, Patrick A. Messerlin, Bruce M. Owen, Robert S. Pindyck, Vernon L. Smith, Scott Wallsten, Leonard Waverman, Lawrence J. White & Scott Savage, Economists' Statement on Network Neutrality Policy.score: 30.0
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  44. Donald V. Morano, Harold J. Allen, Ervin Laszlo & Cheryl Noble (1975). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 9 (2):152-160.score: 30.0
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  45. Alice A. Noble (2006). DNA Fingerprinting and Civil Liberties. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (2):149-152.score: 30.0
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  46. Alice A. Noble, Andrew L. Hyams & Nancy M. Kane (1998). Charitable Hospital Accountability: A Review and Analysis of Legal and Policy Initiatives. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (2):116-137.score: 30.0
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  47. Denis Noble (1967). Charles Taylor on Teleological Explanation. Analysis 27 (3):96 - 103.score: 30.0
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  48. R. Edward Freeman, Salme Nasi & Grant Savage (2010). Special Issue on Stakeholder Thinking: A Tribute to Juha Nasi. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (S1):1-1.score: 30.0
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