Search results for 'Nonconsensual publication' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  8
    Hylarie Kochiras (2006). Freud Said--Or Simon Says? Informed Consent and the Advancement of Psychoanalysis as a Science. Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy 9 (2):227-241.
    Is it ever permissible to publish a patient’s confidences without permission? I investigate this question for the field of psychoanalysis. Whereas most medical fields adopted a 1995 recommendation for consent requirements, psychoanalysis continues to defend the traditional practice of nonconsensual publication. Both the hermeneutic and the scientific branches of the field justify the practice, arguing that it provides data needed to help future patients, and both branches advance generalizations and causal claims. However the hermeneutic branch embraces methods tending (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Mindaugas Broga, Goran Mijaljica, Marcin Waligora, Aime Keis & Ana Marusic (2013). Publication Ethics in Biomedical Journals From Countries in Central and Eastern Europe. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-11.
    Publication ethics is an important aspect of both the research and publication enterprises. It is particularly important in the field of biomedical science because published data may directly affect human health. In this article, we examine publication ethics policies in biomedical journals published in Central and Eastern Europe. We were interested in possible differences between East European countries that are members of the European Union (Eastern EU) and South-East European countries (South-East Europe) that are not members of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  12
    Muriel Bebeau & Verna Monson (2011). Authorship and Publication Practices in the Social Sciences: Historical Reflections on Current Practices. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):365-388.
    An historical review of authorship definitions and publication practices that are embedded in directions to authors and in the codes of ethics in the fields of psychology, sociology, and education illuminates reasonable agreement and consistency across the fields with regard to (a) originality of the work submitted, (b) data sharing, (c) human participants’ protection, and (d) conflict of interest disclosure. However, the role of the professional association in addressing violations of research or publication practices varies among these fields. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  4.  8
    Francis Macrina (2011). Teaching Authorship and Publication Practices in the Biomedical and Life Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):341-354.
    Examination of a limited number of publisher’s Instructions for Authors, guidelines from two scientific societies, and the widely accepted policy document of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) provided useful information on authorship practices. Three of five journals examined (Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) publish papers across a variety of disciplines. One is broadly focused on topics in medical research (New England Journal of Medicine) and one publishes research reports in a single (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  5.  89
    Berna Arda (2012). Publication Ethics From the Perspective of PhD Students of Health Sciences: A Limited Experience. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):213-222.
    Publication ethics, an important subtopic of science ethics, deals with determination of the misconducts of science in performing research or in the dissemination of ideas, data and products. Science, the main features of which are secure, reliable and ethically obtained data, plays a major role in shaping the society. As long as science maintains its quality by being based on reliable and ethically obtained data, it will be possible to maintain its role in shaping the society. This article is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  8
    Agnes A. van der Schot & Clive Phillips (2013). Publication Bias in Animal Welfare Scientific Literature. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):945-958.
    Animal welfare scientific literature has accumulated rapidly in recent years, but bias may exist which influences understanding of progress in the field. We conducted a survey of articles related to animal welfare or well being from an electronic database. From 8,541 articles on this topic, we randomly selected 115 articles for detailed review in four funding categories: government; charity and/or scientific association; industry; and educational organization. Ninety articles were evaluated after unsuitable articles were rejected. The welfare states of animals in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  16
    Tom Jefferson (1998). Redundant Publication in Biomedical Sciences: Scientific Misconduct or Necessity? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):135-140.
    Redundant publication in biomedical sciences is the presentation of the same information or data set more than once. Forms of redundant publication include “salami slicing”, in which similar text accompanies data presented in disaggregated fashion in different publications and “duplicate or multiple publication” in which identical information is presented with a virtually identical text. Estimates of prevalence of the phenomenon put it at 10 to 25% of published literature. Redundant publication can be considered unethical, or fraudulent, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  8. Addeane S. Caelleigh (2003). Roles for Scientific Societies in Promoting Integrity in Publication Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):221-241.
    Scientific societies can have a powerful influence on the professional lives of scientists. Using this influence, they have a responsibility to make long-term commitments and investments in promoting integrity in publication, just as in other areas of research ethics. Concepts that can inform the thinking and activities of scientific societies with regard to publication ethics are: the “hidden curriculum” (the message of actions rather than formal statements), a fresh look at the components of acting with integrity, deviancy as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9.  44
    Sergio Sismondo & Mathieu Doucet (2009). Publication Ethics and the Ghost Management of Medical Publication. Bioethics 24 (6):273-283.
    It is by now no secret that some scientific articles are ghost authored – that is, written by someone other than the person whose name appears at the top of the article. Ghost authorship, however, is only one sort of ghosting. In this article, we present evidence that pharmaceutical companies engage in the ghost management of the scientific literature, by controlling or shaping several crucial steps in the research, writing, and publication of scientific articles. Ghost management allows the pharmaceutical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  21
    Krishna Regmi (2011). Ethical and Legal Issues in Publication and Dissemination of Scholarly Knowledge: A Summary of the Published Evidence. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (1):71-81.
    Research publication and dissemination of scholarly knowledge in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are among the most influential roles of many academic scholars in both industrialised and developing nations, but such experience and skills are rarely taught, transferred and shared in the real world. Dealing with issues of research misconduct might be challenging as well as learning opportunities for new academics while conducting research and scholarship teaching and publication in HEIs. In this review paper, I will discuss some concepts (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  71
    Jong Foo & Stephen Wilson (2012). An Analysis on the Research Ethics Cases Managed by the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Between 1997 and 2010. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):621-631.
    The growing emphasis on the importance of publishing scientific findings in the academic world has led to increasing prevalence of potentially significant publications in which scientific and ethical rigour may be questioned. This has not only hindered research progress, but also eroded public trust in all scientific advances. In view of the increasing concern and the complexity of research misconduct, the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) was established in 1997 to manage cases with ethical implications. In order to review (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  3
    Alastair Matheson (2016). The ICMJE Recommendations and Pharmaceutical Marketing – Strengths, Weaknesses and the Unsolved Problem of Attribution in Publication Ethics. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundThe International Committee of Medical Journal Editors Recommendations set ethical and editorial standards for article publication in most leading medical journals. Here, I examine the strengths and weaknesses of the Recommendations in the prevention of commercial bias in industry-financed journal literature, on three levels – scholarly discourse, article content, and article attribution.DiscussionWith respect to overall discourse, the most important measures in the ICMJE Recommendations are for enforcing clinical trial registration and controlling duplicate publication. With respect to article content, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  22
    Domenic V. Cicchetti (1997). Referees, Editors, and Publication Practices: Improving the Reliability and Usefulness of the Peer Review System. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):51-62.
    The documented low levels of reliability of the peer review process present a serious challenge to editors who must often base their publication decisions on conflicting referee recommendations. The purpose of this article is to discuss this process and examine ways to produce a more reliable and useful peer review system.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  14.  10
    Paul Smeyers & Bas Levering (2000). Educational Research: Language and Content. Lessons in Publication Policies From the Low Countries. British Journal of Educational Studies 48 (1):70 - 81.
    Owing to the growing internationalisation of research, educational researchers in the Netherlands are increasingly expected to publish through the medium of the English language. Though this undoubtedly benefits the communication between scholars, there are also side-effects. This paper discusses problematic issues from three perspectives: (i) the use of a non-native language for communication between scholars in the area of education; (ii) the use either exclusively, or not, of a publication record of such publications for purposes of recruitment and promotion (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  6
    Rasheda Begum & Simon Kolstoe (2015). Can UK NHS Research Ethics Committees Effectively Monitor Publication and Outcome Reporting Bias? BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-5.
    BackgroundPublication and outcome reporting bias is often caused by researchers selectively choosing which scientific results and outcomes to publish. This behaviour is ethically significant as it distorts the literature used for future scientific or clinical decision-making. This study investigates the practicalities of using ethics applications submitted to a UK National Health Service research ethics committee to monitor both types of reporting bias.MethodsAs part of an internal audit we accessed research ethics database records for studies submitting an end of study declaration (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  2
    Lisa M. Robins & Peter J. Kanowski (2008). PhD by Publication: A Student's Perspective. Journal of Research Practice 4 (2):Article M3.
    This article presents the first author's experiences as an Australian doctoral student undertaking a PhD by publication in the arena of the social sciences. She published nine articles in refereed journals and a peer-reviewed book chapter during the course of her PhD. We situate this experience in the context of current discussion about doctoral publication practices, in order to inform both postgraduate students and academics in general. The article discusses recent thinking about PhD by publication and identifies (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  20
    Agnes A. Schot & Clive Phillips (2013). Publication Bias in Animal Welfare Scientific Literature. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):945-958.
    Animal welfare scientific literature has accumulated rapidly in recent years, but bias may exist which influences understanding of progress in the field. We conducted a survey of articles related to animal welfare or well being from an electronic database. From 8,541 articles on this topic, we randomly selected 115 articles for detailed review in four funding categories: government; charity and/or scientific association; industry; and educational organization. Ninety articles were evaluated after unsuitable articles were rejected. The welfare states of animals in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  16
    David A. Rier (2004). Publication Visibility of Sensitive Public Health Data: When Scientists Bury Their Results. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):597-613.
    What happens when the scientific tradition of openness clashes with potential societal risks? The work of American toxic-exposure epidemiologists can attract media coverage and lead the public to change health practices, initiate lawsuits, or take other steps a study’s authors might consider unwarranted. This paper, reporting data from 61 semi-structured interviews with U.S. toxic-exposure epidemiologists, examines whether such possibilities shaped epidemiologists’ selection of journals for potentially sensitive papers. Respondents manifested strong support for the norm of scientific openness, but a significant (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  4
    Sonia Maria Ramos de Vasconcelos & Miguel Roig (2015). Prior Publication and Redundancy in Contemporary Science: Are Authors and Editors at the Crossroads? Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (5):1367-1378.
    We discuss prior publication and redundancy in contemporary science in the context of changing perceptions of originality in the communication of research results. These perceptions have been changing in the publication realm, particularly in the last 15 years. Presenting a brief overview of the literature, we address some of the conflicts that are likely to arise between authors and editors. We illustrate our approach with conference presentations that are later published as journal articles and focus on a recent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  13
    Marcus M. Reidenberg (2002). Conflict of Interest and Medical Publication. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):455-457.
    One of the important causes of bias in the medical literature is failure to publish data because it is “negative”. Usually, this is due to failure to write a manuscript and submit it for publication. Since publication is an essential part of research and patients have been recruited into a study in the belief that they are participating in medical research, there is an ethical commitment to publish the observations made on volunteer subjects. This can be enforced by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  8
    Carla Angelski, Conrad Fernandez, Charles Weijer & Jun Gao (2012). The Publication of Ethically Uncertain Research: Attitudes and Practices of Journal Editors. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):4-.
    Background: Publication of ethically uncertain research occurs despite well-published guidelines set forth in documents such as the Declaration of Helsinki. Such guidelines exist to aide editorial staff in making decisions regarding ethical acceptability of manuscripts submitted for publication, yet examples of ethically suspect and uncertain publication exist. Our objective was to survey journal editors regarding practices and attitudes surrounding such dilemmas. Methods: The Editor-in-chief of each of the 103 English-language journals from the 2005 Abridged Index Medicus list (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  6
    Carole J. Torgerson (2006). Publication Bias: The Achilles' Heel of Systematic Reviews? British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (1):89 - 102.
    The term 'publication bias' usually refers to the tendency for a greater proportion of statistically significant positive results of experiments to be published and, conversely, a greater proportion of statistically significant negative or null results not to be published. It is widely accepted in the fields of healthcare and psychological research to be a major threat to the validity of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Some methodological work has previously been undertaken, by the author and others, in the field of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Flora Colledge, Bernice Elger & David Shaw (2013). “Conferring Authorship”: Biobank Stakeholders’ Experiences with Publication Credit in Collaborative Research. PLoS ONE 8:e76686.
    Background: Multi-collaborator research is increasingly becoming the norm in the field of biomedicine. With this trend comes the imperative to award recognition to all those who contribute to a study; however, there is a gap in the current “gold standard” in authorship guidelines with regards to the efforts of those who provide high quality biosamples and data, yet do not play a role in the intellectual development of the final publication. -/- Methods and findings: We carried out interviews with (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  5
    Michael JG Farthing (2006). Authors and Publication Practices. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):41-52.
    This article looks at the ethical quandaries, and their social and political context, which emerge as a result of international nuclear waste substitution. In particular it addresses the dilemmas inherent within the proposed return of nuclear waste owned by Japanese nuclear companies and currently stored in the United Kingdom. The UK company responsible for this waste, British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL), wish to substitute this high volume intermediate-level Japanese-owned radioactive waste for a much lower volume of much more highly radioactive (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25.  13
    Maarten van Wesel (2016). Evaluation by Citation: Trends in Publication Behavior, Evaluation Criteria, and the Strive for High Impact Publications. Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):199-225.
    Criteria for the evaluation of most scholars’ work have recently received wider attention due to high-profile cases of scientific misconduct which are perceived to be linked to these criteria. However, in the competition for career advancement and funding opportunities almost all scholars are subjected to the same criteria. Therefore these evaluation criteria act as ‘switchmen’, determining the tracks along which scholarly work is pushed by the dynamic interplay of interests of both scholars and their institutions. Currently one of the most (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  3
    Carrol Preston, Deborah Ashby & Rosalind Smyth (2004). Adjusting for Publication Bias: Modelling the Selection Process. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (2):313-322.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  6
    Francisco M. Salzano & A. Magdalena Hurtado (eds.) (2004). Lost Paradises and the Ethics of Research and Publication. Oxford University Press.
    In 2000, the world of anthropology was rocked by a high-profile debate over the fieldwork performed by two prominent anthropologists, Napoleon Chagnon and James V. Neel, among the Yanamamo tribe of South America. The controversy was fueled by the publication of Patrick Tierney's incendiary Darkness in El Dorado which accused Chagnon of not only misinterpreting but actually inciting some of the violence he perceived among these "fierce people". Tierney also pointed the finger at Neel as the unwitting agent of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  27
    E. Wager, S. Fiack, C. Graf, A. Robinson & I. Rowlands (2009). Science Journal Editors' Views on Publication Ethics: Results of an International Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):348-353.
    Background: Breaches of publication ethics such as plagiarism, data fabrication and redundant publication are recognised as forms of research misconduct that can undermine the scientific literature. We surveyed journal editors to determine their views about a range of publication ethics issues. Methods: Questionnaire sent to 524 editors-in-chief of Wiley-Blackwell science journals asking about the severity and frequency of 16 ethical issues at their journals, their confidence in handling such issues, and their awareness and use of guidelines. Results: (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  29. J. Luty, S. M. R. Arokiadass, J. M. Easow & J. R. Anapreddy (2009). Preferential Publication of Editorial Board Members in Medical Specialty Journals. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):200-202.
    Next SectionBackground: Publication bias and discrimination are increasingly recognised in medicine. A survey was conducted to determine if medical journals were more likely to publish research reports from members of their own than a rival journal’s editorial board. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of all research reports published in 2006 in the four competing medical journals within five medical specialties. Only three journals were willing to divulge the authorship of reports that had been rejected. Results: Overall, 4460 research (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30. Bethany Spielman (2015). Nonconsensual Clinical Trials: A Foreseeable Risk of Offshoring Under Global Corporatism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):101-106.
    This paper explores the connection of offshoring and outsourcing to nonconsensual global pharmaceutical trials in low-income countries. After discussing reasons why the topic of nonconsensual offshored clinical trials may be overlooked in bioethics literature, I suggest that when pharmaceutical corporations offshore clinical trials today, nonconsensual experiments are often foreseeable and not simply the result of aberrant ethical conduct by a few individuals. Offshoring of clinical trials is structured so that experiments can be presented as health care in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  3
    A. Blumle, G. Antes, M. Schumacher, H. Just & E. von Elm (2008). Clinical Research Projects at a German Medical Faculty: Follow-Up From Ethical Approval to Publication and Citation by Others. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e20-e20.
    Background: Only data of published study results are available to the scientific community for further use such as informing future research and synthesis of available evidence. If study results are reported selectively, reporting bias and distortion of summarised estimates of effect or harm of treatments can occur. The publication and citation of results of clinical research conducted in Germany was studied.Methods: The protocols of clinical research projects submitted to the research ethics committee of the University of Freiburg in 2000 (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  32.  10
    Michael J. G. Farthing (2006). Authors and Publication Practices. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):41-52.
    Although authors are usually considered to be the main perpetrators of research and publication misconduct, any person involved in the process has the potential to offend. Editors may breach ethical standards particularly with respect to conflicts of interest. In the same way that authors are now required to declare competing interests, notably commercial affiliations, financial interests and personal connections, so must editors. Editors can influence the chances of acceptance or rejection of a paper by reviewer selection. Reviewers should also (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33.  34
    Susan Haack (2007). Peer Review and Publication: Lessons for Lawyers. Stetson Law Review 36 (3).
    Peer review and publication is one of the factors proposed in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. as indicia of the reliability of scientific testimony. This Article traces the origins of the peer-review system, the process by which it became standard at scientific and medical journals, and the many roles it now plays. Additionally, the Author articulates the epistemological rationale for pre-publication peer-review and the inherent limitations of the system as a scientific quality-control mechanism. The Article explores recent (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34.  16
    Ronald N. Kostoff, Dustin Johnson, J. Antonio Ridelo, Louis A. Bloomfield, Michael F. Shlesinger, Guido Malpohl & Hector D. Cortes (2006). Duplicate Publication and 'Paper Inflation' in the Fractals Literature. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3).
    The similarity of documents in a large database of published Fractals articles was examined for redundancy. Three different text matching techniques were used on published Abstracts to identify redundancy candidates, and predictions were verified by reading full text versions of the redundancy candidate articles. A small fraction of the total articles in the database was judged to be redundant. This was viewed as a lower limit, because it excluded cases where the concepts remained the same, but the text was altered (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  9
    Jo Ann Carland, James W. Carland & Carroll D. Aby (1992). Proposed Codification of Ethicacy in the Publication Process. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (2):95 - 104.
    The pressure for publication is ever present in academe. Rules for submission are elucidated by conferences, proceedings and journals for the benefit of authors; however, the rules for reviewers and editors are not so well established or consistent. This treatise examines examples of abuse of the editorial process and points to a need for formal recognition of rules for review. The manuscript culminates with proposed Codes of Ethics for researchers, referees and editors and suggestions for improvement of the peer (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  29
    Joseph Fulda (2007). The Ethics of Pseudonymous Publication. Journal of Information Ethics 16 (2):75-89.
    This article explores the ethics of pseudonymous publication of nonfiction by examining what and why an author might hide behind the veil of pseudonymity, when this is and is not appropriate, and when it is deemed appropriate what measures should be taken to ensure accountability despite the veil. The argument begins by assuming that the sole duty an author has qua author is to his audience and centers on issues in both ethics and philosophy of language.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  1
    Paolo Gonthier, Ivan Visentin, Danila Valentino, Giacomo Tamietti & Francesca Cardinale (forthcoming). The Legitimate Name of a Fungal Plant Pathogen and the Ethics of Publication in the Era of Traceability. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-3.
    When more scientists describe independently the same species under different valid Latin names, a case of synonymy occurs. In such a case, the international nomenclature rules stipulate that the first name to appear on a peer-reviewed publication has priority over the others. Based on a recent episode involving priority determination between two competing names of the same fungal plant pathogen, this letter wishes to open a discussion on the ethics of scientific publications and points out the necessity of a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  3
    A. Sheikh (2000). Publication Ethics and the Research Assessment Exercise: Reflections on the Troubled Question of Authorship. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (6):422-426.
    The research assessment exercise forms the basis for determining the funding of higher education institutions in the UK. Monies are distributed according to a range of performance criteria, the most important of which is “research outputs”. Problems to do with publication misconduct, and in particular, issues of justice in attributing authorship, are endemic within the research community. It is here argued that the research assessment exercise currently makes no explicit attempt to address these concerns, and indeed, by focusing attention (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39.  4
    Graham Kendall, Angelina Yee & Barry McCollum (forthcoming). Is There a Role for Publication Consultants and How Should Their Contribution Be Recognized? Science and Engineering Ethics:1-8.
    When a scientific paper, dissertation or thesis is published the author have a duty to report who has contributed to the work. This recognition can take several forms such as authorship, relevant acknowledgments and by citing previous work. There is a growing industry where publication consultants will work with authors, research groups or even institutions to help get their work published, or help submit their dissertation/thesis. This help can range from proof reading, data collection, analysis, helping with the literature (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  18
    Verena Tschudin (2006). How Nursing Ethics as a Subject Changes: An Analysis of the First 11 Years of Publication of the Journal Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 13 (1):65-85.
    By analysing the first, second, 10th and 11th years of publication (i.e. volumes 1, 2, 10, 11) of Nursing Ethics, I will show the significant visible trends in the articles and draw some conclusions. The trends are visible at various levels: from simple analysis of an issue, or a comment on a situation in the early years, to in-depth philosophical and research studies; and from short statements to much longer articles. The ethical approaches used go from either none or (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  8
    K. Brad Wray & Lutz Bornmann (2015). Philosophy of Science Viewed Through the Lense of “Referenced Publication Years Spectroscopy” (RPYS). Scientometrics 102 (3):1987-1996.
    We examine the sub-field of philosophy of science using a new method developed in information science, Referenced Publication Years Spectroscopy (RPYS). RPYS allows us to identify peak years in citations in a field, which promises to help scholars identify the key contributions to a field, and revolutionary discoveries in a field. We discovered that philosophy of science, a sub-field in the humanities, differs significantly from other fields examined with this method. Books play a more important role in philosophy of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  12
    Niccolò Guicciardini (2004). Isaac Newton and the Publication of His Mathematical Manuscripts. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):455-470.
    Newton composed several mathematical tracts which remained in manuscript form for decades. He chose to print some of his mathematical tracts in their entirety only after 1704. In this paper I will give information on the dissemination of Newton’s mathematical manuscripts before the eighteenth-century printing stage. I will not consider another important vehicle of dissemination of Newton’s mathematical discoveries, namely his correspondence with other mathematicians or with intermediaries such as Collins and Oldenburg.In a first stage, Newton’s mathematical manuscripts were rendered (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  2
    Jorn Sonderholm (2016). Is the Publication of Exit Poll Results Morally Permissible? Public Affairs Quarterly 30 (1):51-56.
    This article is about exit polls. It addresses the question of whether or not it is morally permissible to publish exit poll results. The conclusion of the article is that an affirmative answer should be given to this question. In section 2, the master argument in favor of the moral permissibility of the publication of exit poll results is introduced. This is a strong argument. It is, however, argued that it might be the case that the conclusion of this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  32
    Sergio Sismondo, Publication Planning 101: A Report.
    Publication planning is the sub-industry to the pharmaceutical industry that does the organizational and practical work of shaping pharmaceutical companies' data and turning it into medical journal articles. Its main purpose is to create and communicate scientific information to support the marketing of products. This report is based mostly on information presented at the 2007 annual meeting of the International Society of Medical Planning Professionals, including a workshop entitled "Publication Planning 101/201", attended by one of us. We provide (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Joseph Alper & Jon Beckwith (1998). Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination legislationRedundant Publication in Biomedical Sciences: Scientific Misconduct or Necessity? Science and Engineering Ethics 4:141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty in (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46. Martin B. Van der Weyden (2007). The ICMJE and URM: Providing Independent Advice for the Conduct of Biomedical Research and Publication. Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):15.
    The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors is a working group of editors of selected medical journals that meets annually. Founded in Vancouver, Canada, in 1978, it currently consists of 11 member journals and a representative of the US National Library of Medicine. The major purpose of the Committee is to address and provide guidance for the conduct and publishing of biomedical research and the ethical tenets underpinning these activities. This advice is detailed in the Committee's Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  32
    Ronald M. Davis, Anne Victoria Neale & Joseph C. Monsur (2003). Medical Journals' Conflicts of Interest in the Publication of Book Reviews. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (4):471-483.
    The purpose of the study was to assess medical journals’ conflicts of interest in the publication of book reviews. We examined book reviews published in 1999, 2000, and 2001 in five leading medical journals: Annals of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine. The main outcome measure was journal publication of reviews of books that had been published by the journal’s own publisher, that had been edited or (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  7
    M. B. Weyden (2007). The ICMJE and URM: Providing Independent Advice for the Conduct of Biomedical Research and Publication. Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):15.
    _The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) is a working group of editors of selected medical journals that meets annually. Founded in Vancouver, Canada, in 1978, it currently consists of 11 member journals and a representative of the US National Library of Medicine. The major purpose of the Committee is to address and provide guidance for the conduct and publishing of biomedical research and the ethical tenets underpinning these activities. This advice is detailed in the Committee's _ Uniform Requirements (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  5
    Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2014). Nonconsensual Withdrawal of Nutrition and Hydration in Prolonged Disorders of Consciousness: Authoritarianism and Trustworthiness in Medicine. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):16.
    The Royal College of Physicians of London published the 2013 national clinical guidelines on prolonged disorders of consciousness in vegetative and minimally conscious states. The guidelines acknowledge the rapidly advancing neuroscientific research and evolving therapeutic modalities in PDOC. However, the guidelines state that end-of-life decisions should be made for patients who do not improve with neurorehabilitation within a finite period, and they recommend withdrawal of clinically assisted nutrition and hydration . This withdrawal is deemed necessary because patients in PDOC can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  3
    A. McRae, M. Taljaard, C. Weijer, C. Bennett, Z. Skea, R. Boruch, J. Brehaut, M. Eccles, J. Grimshaw & A. Donner (2013). Reporting of Patient Consent in Healthcare Cluster Randomised Trials is Associated with the Type of Study Interventions and Publication Characteristics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (2):119-124.
    Objective Cluster randomised trial (CRT) investigators face challenges in seeking informed consent from individual patients (cluster members). This study examined associations between reporting of patient consent in healthcare CRTs and characteristics of these trials. Study design Consent practices and study characteristics were abstracted from a random sample of 160 CRTs performed in primary or hospital care settings that were published from 2000 to 2008. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between reporting of patient consent and methodological characteristics, as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000