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Nora K. Bell [6]Nora Kizer Bell [2]
  1. Nora K. Bell, Samantha J. Brennan, William F. Bristow, Diana H. Coole, Justin DArms, Michael S. Davis, Daniel A. Dombrowski, John J. P. Donnelly, Anthony J. Ellis, Mark C. Fowler, Alan E. Fuchs, Chris Hackler, Garth L. Hallett, Rita C. Manning, Kevin E. Olson, Lansing R. Pollock, Marc Lee Raphael, Robert A. Sedler, Charlene Haddock Seigfried, Kristin S. Schrader‐Frechette, Anita Silvers, Doran Smolkin, Alan G. Soble, James P. Sterba, Stephen P. Turner & Eric Watkins (2001). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (2):446-459.
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  2. Nora Kizer Bell (1992). If Age Becomes a Standard for Rationing Health Care. In Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.), Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press. 82.
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  3. Nora K. Bell (1989). Review: What Setting Limits May Mean: A Feminist Critique of Daniel Callahan's "Setting Limits". [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (2):169 - 178.
    In Setting Limits, Daniel Callahan advances the provocative thesis that age be a limiting factor in decisions to allocate certain kinds of health services to the elderly. However, when one looks at available data, one discovers that there are many more elderly women than there are elderly men, and these older women are poorer, more apt to live alone, and less likely to have informal social and personal supports than their male counterparts. Older women, therefore, will make the heaviest demand (...)
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  4. Nora Kizer Bell (1989). Women and AIDS: Too Little, Too Late? Hypatia 4 (3):3 - 22.
    Many authors examine the governmental, the scientific, and the sexual politics of AIDS. Many of these same authors tell the AIDS story within the context of decrying homophobia. The implications of that story, however, have a troubling significance for women. This essay proposes to move the discussion of the sexual politics of AIDS beyond the confines of homophobia and to highlight issues not widely discussed outside of AIDS activist circles-issues which are having, and will continue to have, profound effects on (...)
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  5. Nora K. Bell & Barry M. Loewer (1985). What Is Wrong With 'Wrongful Life' Cases? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (May):127-146.
    ‘Wrongful life’ torts raise a number of interesting and perplexing philosophical issues. In a suit for ‘wrongful life’, the plaintiff (usually an infant) brings an action (usually against a physician) claiming that some negligent action has caused the plaintiff's life, say by not informing the parents of the likely prospect that their child would be born with severe defects. The most perplexing feature of this is that the plaintiff is claiming that he would have been better off if he had (...)
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  6. Nora K. Bell (1980). Justice and Health Care. Hastings Center Report 10 (2):48-49.
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  7. Nora K. Bell (1979). The Scarcity of Medical Resources: Are There Rights to Health Care? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):158-169.
  8. Nora K. Bell (1978). Nozick and the Principle of Fairness. Social Theory and Practice 5 (1):65-73.
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