Search results for 'Norm (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Norman Swartz (1993). Pascal Engel, The Norm of Truth: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (2):86-88.
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  2.  17
    Pascal Engel (1991). The Norm of Truth: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic. University of Toronto Press.
  3. Gavin Lawrence (2011). 1. Background. Practical Philosophy: Praxis, Rational Choice, Full Human Character (Ethos), the Norm of Character, and Dimensions of Agency—Attraction and Value. [REVIEW] In Michael Pakaluk & Giles Pearson (eds.), Moral Psychology and Human Action in Aristotle. Oxford University Press 233.
     
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  4. Anthonie Meijers (1999). Pascal Engel is Professor of Philosophy at the Universite de Paris IV-Sorbonne (Paris). He is a Member of the Institut Universitaire de France, and Former Presi-Dent of the Societe de Philosophic Analytique, the French Branch of ESAP. He Teaches Philosophy of Logic, of Language, and of Mind and has Written a Number of Articles and Books in These Areas, Including The Norm of Truth (1991), David. [REVIEW] In A. W. M. Meihers (ed.), Belief, Cognition, and the Will. Tilburg University Press 6--113.
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  5. Yc Zarka (1995). Cudworth, Ralph and the Foundations of Morality+ on the Criticism of the Moral-Philosophy of Hobbes, Thomas-Action, Subject and Norm. Archives de Philosophie 58 (3):405-420.
  6. Jacek Jadacki (2012). Byt I Powinność: Wkład Xx-Wiecznych Myślicieli Polskich Do Teorii Imperatywów I Norm. Wydawn. Naukowe "Semper".
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  7. Joseph Raz (1975). Practical Reason and Norms. Hutchinson.
    Joseph Raz answers these three questions by taking reasons as the basic normative concept, and showing the distinctive role reasons have in every case, thus ...
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  8. Rachel McKinnon (2015). Norms of Assertion: Truth, Lies, and Warrant. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book is about the norms of the speech act of assertion. This is a topic of lively contemporary debate primarily carried out in epistemology and philosophy of language. Suppose that you ask me what time an upcoming meeting starts, and I say, “4 p.m.” I’ve just asserted that the meeting starts at 4 p.m. Whenever we make claims like this, we’re asserting. The central question here is whether we need to know what we say, and, relatedly, whether what we (...)
     
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  9.  67
    Iulian D. Toader (2016). Why Did Weyl Think That Dedekind's Norm of Belief in Mathematics is Perverse? In Early Analytic Philosophy – New Perspectives on the Tradition. The Western Ontario Series in Philosophy of Science, Vol. 80, 445-451.
    This paper discusses an intriguing, though rather overlooked case of normative disagreement in the history of philosophy of mathematics: Weyl's criticism of Dedekind’s famous principle that "In science, what is provable ought not to be believed without proof." This criticism, as I see it, challenges not only a logicist norm of belief in mathematics, but also a realist view about whether there is a fact of the matter as to what norms of belief are correct.
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  10.  18
    Isaac Levi (1997). The Covenant of Reason: Rationality and the Commitments of Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    Isaac Levi is one of the preeminent philosophers in the areas of pragmatic rationality and epistemology. This collection of essays constitutes an important presentation of his original and influential ideas about rational choice and belief. A wide range of topics is covered, including consequentialism and sequential choice, consensus, voluntarism of belief, and the tolerance of the opinions of others. The essays elaborate on the idea that principles of rationality are norms that regulate the coherence of our beliefs and values with (...)
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  11.  33
    Mark Norris Lance (1997). The Grammar of Meaning: Normativity and Semantic Discourse. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the function of concepts pertaining to meaning in socio-linguistic practice? In this study, the authors argue that we can approach a satisfactory answer by displacing the standard picture of meaning talk as a sort of description with a picture that takes seriously the similarity between meaning talk and various types of normative injunction. In their discussion of this approach, they investigate the more general question of the nature of the normative, as well as a range of important topics (...)
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  12.  31
    Matteo Colombo (2016). Experimental Philosophy of Explanation Rising: The Case for a Plurality of Concepts of Explanation. Cognitive Science 40 (5).
    This paper brings together results from the philosophy and the psychology of explanation to argue that there are multiple concepts of explanation in human psychology. Specifically, it is shown that pluralism about explanation coheres with the multiplicity of models of explanation available in the philosophy of science, and it is supported by evidence from the psychology of explanatory judgment. Focusing on the case of a norm of explanatory power, the paper concludes by responding to the worry that if there (...)
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  13. Jack Reynolds (2010). Common Sense and Philosophical Methodology: Some Metaphilosophical Reflections on Analytic Philosophy and Deleuze. Philosophical Forum 41 (3):231-258.
    On the question of precisely what role common sense (or related datum like folk psychology, trust in pre-theoretic/intuitive judgments, etc.) should have in reigning in the possible excesses of our philosophical methods, the so-called ‘continental’ answer to this question, for the vast majority, would be “as little as possible”, whereas the analytic answer for the vast majority would be “a reasonably central one”. While this difference at the level of both rhetoric and meta-philosophy is sometimes – perhaps often – problematised (...)
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  14.  4
    Reiner Schürmann (2003). Broken Hegemonies. Indiana University Press.
    " --John Sallis In Broken Hegemonies, the late distinguished philosopher Reiner Schürmann offers a radical rethinking of the history of Western philosophy from the Greeks through Heidegger.
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  15. Vincent G. Potter (1967). Charles S. Peirce on Norms & Ideals. Fordham University Press.
    In recent years, Charles Sanders Peirce has emerged, in the eyes of philosophers both in America and abroad, as one of America’s major philosophical thinkers. His work has forced us back to philosophical reflection about those basic issues that inevitably confront us as human beings, especially in an age of science. Peirce’s concern for experience, for what is actually encountered, means that his philosophy, even in its most technical aspects, forms a reflective commentary on actual life and on the world (...)
     
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  16.  9
    Predrag Krstic (2007). Why Still Philosophy?: Once Again. Filozofija I Društvo 18 (3):31-39.
    The intention of this paper is to revisit, once again the question asked by Adorno and Habermas and other contemporary thinkers under different headings, few decades ago. The author is suggesting that nowadays philosophy requires a final departure from the idea of having single and perennial face, and that this would not only allow, but also enable philosophy to test its various faces freely, that is, without norm or limit set in advance. At the same time, by creating such (...)
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  17.  13
    Catherine Osborne (1998). Was Verse the Default Form for Presocratic Philosophy? In Catherine Atherton (ed.), Form and Content in Didactic Poetry.
    I argue that philosophy was naturally conceived and written in verse, not prose, in the early years of philosophy, and that prose writing would be the exception not the norm. I argue that philosophers developed their ideas in verse and did not repackage ideas and thoughts first formulated in non-poetic genres, so there is no adaptation or modification involved in "putting it into poetry". This also means that the content and the form are interdependent, and the poetic details are (...)
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  18.  11
    Richard M. Zaner (2004). The Discipline of the “Norm:” A Critical Appreciation of Erwin Strauss. [REVIEW] Human Studies 27 (1):37-50.
    As a practicing physician (psychiatrist), scientist (neurologist) and philosopher, Erwin Straus developed a body of writing which, falling within the phenomenological tradition, is highly original and insightful. His unusual combination of work from these three areas constitutes one of the most important attempts to provide what has been called a new Paideia. Regarding this unique blend of perspectives and concerns as quite natural, he conceived his work variously as a medical anthropologyrdquo; or phenomenological psychology. In the end, he was both (...)
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  19.  14
    Hector-Neri Castañeda (1975). Thinking and Doing: The Philosophical Foundations of Institutions. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
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  20.  53
    Sven Ove Hansson (2001). The Structure of Values and Norms. Cambridge University Press.
    Formal representations of values and norms are employed in several academic disciplines and specialties, such as economics, jurisprudence, decision theory, and social choice theory. Sven Ove Hansson closely examines such foundational issues as the values of wholes and the values of their parts, the connections between values and norms, how values can be decision-guiding and the structure of normative codes with formal precision. Models of change in both preferences and norms are offered, as well as a new method to base (...)
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  21. Stefano Bertea & George Pavlakos (eds.) (2011). New Essays on the Normativity of Law. Hart Pub..
     
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  22.  57
    Sami Pihlström & Arto Siitonen (2005). The Transcendental Method and (Post-)Empiricist Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 36 (1):81 - 106.
    This paper reconsiders the relation between Kantian transcendental reflection (including transcendental idealism) and 20th century philosophy of science. As has been pointed out by Michael Friedman and others, the notion of a "relativized a priori" played a central role in Rudolf Carnap's, Hans Reichenbach's and other logical empiricists' thought. Thus, even though the logical empiricists dispensed with Kantian synthetic a priori judgments, they did maintain a crucial Kantian doctrine, viz., a distinction between the (transcendental) level of establishing norms for empirical (...)
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  23.  43
    C. Chimisso (2003). The Tribunal of Philosophy and its Norms: History and Philosophy in Georges Canguilhem's Historical Epistemology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):297-327.
    In this article I assess Georges Canguilhem's historical epistemology with both theoretical and historical questions in mind. From a theoretical point of view, I am concerned with the relation between history and philosophy, and in particular with the philosophical assumptions and external norms that are involved in history writing. Moreover, I am concerned with the role that history can play in the understanding and evaluation of philosophical concepts. From a historical point of view, I regard historical epistemology, as developed by (...)
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  24.  12
    Sami Pihlström (1999). Applied Philosophy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (1):121-133.
    This paper provides a critical discussion of the concept of applied philosophy. Writers specializing in applied philosophy (e.g., in the various fields of applied ethics) often assume what is here called the traditional concept of applied philosophy, i.e., they think of themselves as applying a “pure” (in itself nonapplied) philosophical theory to some humanly important practical problem area. If understood along these lines, applied philosophy can be taken to be analogous toapplied science. However, this analogy collapses as soon as we (...)
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  25.  11
    Dorothy M. Emmet (1941). Kierkegaard and the "Existential" Philosophy. Philosophy 16 (63):257 - 271.
    It is a wise child who knows his own father; and the climate of thought of a generation may be subtly changed without conscious recognition of the formative minds which have been, if not the parents, at least the godparents of that change. That is to say, they have sponsored the baptism of ideas which would only be safe so long as they renounced the world, the flesh, and the devil; but, as is so often the case, when the offspring (...)
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  26.  11
    Elizabeth Potter (1994). Methodological Norms in Traditional and Feminist Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:101 - 108.
    I argue against the assumption that the influence of non-cognitive values must lead to bad science and against the methodological norm that seems to some philosophers to follow from it, viz. that a good philosophy of science should analyze the morally and politically neutral production of good science. Against these, I argue for the assumption that non-cognitive values are compatible with good science and for the metaphilosophical norm that a good philosophy of science should allow us to see (...)
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  27.  35
    Geoffrey Brennan, Lina Eriksson, Robert E. Goodin & Nicholas Southwood (2013). Explaining Norms. Oxford University Press.
    Norms are a pervasive yet mysterious feature of social life. In Explaining Norms, four philosophers and social scientists team up to grapple with some of the many mysteries, offering a comprehensive account of norms: what they are; how and why they emerge, persist and change; and how and to what extent they themselves serve to explain what we do. Norms, they argue, should be understood in non-reductive terms as clusters of normative attitudes that serve the function of making us accountable (...)
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  28. Thomas Gil (2010). Actions, Normativity, and History. Wehrhahn.
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  29. John Paul (2006). Wykłady Lubelskie. Tow. Nauk. Katolickiego Uniwersytetu Lubelskiego.
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  30.  31
    Maureen Sie, Marc Slors & Bert van den Brink (eds.) (2004). Reasons of One's Own. Ashgate.
    This book presents a range of investigative essays on the concept of reasons of one's own by leading authors from all relevant philosophical areas of expertise.
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  31.  37
    Mark Timmons (ed.) (2011). Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics. Oxford Univ Pr.
    Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics is an annual forum for new work in normative ethical theory.
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  32. Zhixun Wei (2008). Jin Zhi Xing Fa Lü Gui Fan de Gai Nian. Shandong Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  33. Mengqiu Xu (ed.) (2011). Gui Fan Tong Lun. Shang Wu Yin Shu Guan.
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  34.  72
    Kevin Reuter, Lara Kirfel, Raphael van Riel & Luca Barlassina (2014). The Good, the Bad, and the Timely: How Temporal Order and Moral Judgment Influence Causal Selection. Frontiers in Psychology 5:1-10.
    Causal selection is the cognitive process through which one or more elements in a complex causal structure are singled out as actual causes of a certain effect. In this paper, we report on an experiment in which we investigated the role of moral and temporal factors in causal selection. Our results are as follows. First, when presented with a temporal chain in which two human agents perform the same action one after the other, subjects tend to judge the later agent (...)
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  35.  20
    Roger A. Shiner (1992). Norm and Nature: The Movements of Legal Thought. Oxford University Press.
    Is the nature of law to be formal procedure or to embody substantive value? This work deals with the traditional conflict in legal philosophy between positivistic and anti-positivistic theories of law. It examines the conflict with respect to seven central issues in legal philosophy--law as a reason for action, law and authority, the internal point of view to law, the acceptance of law, discretion and principle, interpretation and semantics, and law and the common good. This work argues that although this (...)
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  36.  73
    Steven Horst (2010). Beyond Reduction: What Can Philosophy of Mind Learn From Post-Reductionist Philosophy of Science? The Order Project: Online Discussion Papers.
    Recent debates about the metaphysics of mind have tended to assume that inter-theoretic reductions are the norm in the natural sciences. With this assumption in place, the apparent explanatory gaps surrounding consciousness and intentionality seem unique, fascinating, and perhaps metaphysically significant. Over the past several decades, however, philosophers of science have largely rejected the notions that inter-theoretic reduction is either widespread in the natural sciences or a litmus for the legitimacy of the special sciences. If we adopt a post-reductionist (...)
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  37.  47
    Kevin Dorst (2014). Can the Knowledge Norm Co‐Opt the Opt Out? Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 3 (4):273-282.
    The Knowledge Norm of Assertion claims that it is proper to assert that p only if one knows that p. Though supported by a wide range of evidence, it appears to generate incorrect verdicts when applied to utterances of “I don't know.” Instead of being an objection to KNA, I argue that this linguistic data shows that “I don't know” does not standardly function as a literal assertion about one's epistemic status; rather, it is an indirect speech act that (...)
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  38.  23
    William E. O'Brian (2011). Equality in Law and Philosophy. Inquiry 53 (3):257-284.
    This article discusses various arguments for and against treating equality as a fundamental norm in law and political philosophy, combining prior arguments to the effect that equality is essentially an empty idea with arguments that treat it as a non-empty but mistaken value that should be rejected. After concluding that most of the arguments for treating equality as a fundamental value fall victim to one or both of these arguments, it considers more closely arguments made by philosophers such as (...)
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  39. Elizabeth Potter (1995). Good Science and Good Philosophy of Science. Synthese 104 (3):423 - 439.
    I argue against the assumption that the influence of non-cognitive values must lead to bad science, opening the way for the thesis that non-cognitive values are compatible with good science. This, in turn, allows us to answer feminist questions, principally, How do gender politics influence science? without (1) having to reject the question a priori because theories of science assume that political values cannot influence good scientific work and (2) having made a case for the influence of gender politics upon (...)
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  40.  11
    Simon Lumsden (2015). Second Nature and Historical Change in Hegel’s Philosophy of History. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (1):74-94.
    Hegel’s philosophy of history is fundamentally concerned with how shapes of life collapse and transition into new shapes of life. One of the distinguishing features of Hegel’s concern with how a shape of life falls apart and becomes inadequate is the role that habit plays in the transition. A shape of life is an embodied form of existence for Hegel. The animating concepts of a shape of life are affectively inscribed on subjects through complex cultural processes. This paper examines the (...)
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  41.  8
    Bernard Williams (1999). Seminar with Bernard Williams 25 November 1998 — Institute of Philosophy — KU Leuven. Ethical Perspectives 6 (3-4):243-265.
    Arnold Burms: Professor Williams has said that he is willing to answer some of our questions about his work. Given the amount of work he has to do here in a few days, this was a generous decision for which we are genuinely grateful. Professor Van de Putte will start the discussion with some questions about the relation between theory and practice.André Van de Putte: In Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy you situate ethical thought in the context of a (...)
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  42.  30
    Meredith Williams (1990). Social Norms and Narrow Content. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):425-462.
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  43.  14
    Jukka Varelius (2012). Two Challenges for Dignity as an Expressive Norm. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):327-340.
    The concept of dignity figures prominently in legal and moral discussion on such topics as human rights, euthanasia, abortion, and criminal punishment. Yet the notion has been criticized for being indeterminate and either insufficient or redundant (or both) in justifying the kinds of legal and moral rights and views its proponents use it to vindicate. The criticisms have inspired some novel conceptions of dignity. One of them is Tarunabh Khaitan’s proposal that dignity should be understood as an expressive norm. (...)
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  44.  12
    Kristian Klockars (2008). Cosmopolitan Plurality in Arendt's Political Philosophy. Ethical Perspectives 15 (2):193-211.
    The essay interrogates the cosmopolitan level of Arendt’s political philosophy from the viewpoint of her reflections on plurality, the norm of limitless communication and her diagnosis of political institutions. Arendt’s conception of the political and plurality is inherently non-national in character, but she nevertheless rejects the idea of cosmopolitan citizenship. In place of this she introduces the notion of limitless communication. This ideal can be understood either as a straightforward development of the normative ideal of plurality on a cosmopolitan (...)
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  45. Eugenio Bulygin (2015). Essays in Legal Philosophy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Eugenio Bulygin is a distinguished representative of legal science and legal philosophy as they are known on the European continent - no accident, given the role of the civil law tradition in his home country, Argentina. Over the past half-century, Bulygin has engaged virtually all major legal philosophers in the English-speaking countries, including H.L.A. Hart, Ronald Dworkin, and Joseph Raz. Bulygin's essays, several written together with his eminent colleague and close friend Carlos E. Alchourrón, reflect the genre familiar from Alf (...)
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  46. Julian Kiverstein (ed.) (2016). The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of the Social Mind. Routledge.
    The idea that humans are by nature social and political animals can be traced back to Aristotle. More recently, it has also generated great interest and controversy in related disciplines such as anthropology, biology, psychology, neuroscience and even economics. What is it about humans that enabled them to construct a social reality of unrivalled complexity? Is there something distinctive about the human mind that explains how social lives are organised around conventions, norms, and institutions? The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of (...)
     
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  47.  4
    Jakob Lindgaard (2009). John Mcdowell: Experience, Norm, and Nature. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _John McDowell: Experience, Norm, and Nature_ combines original essays by leading contemporary philosophers with point by point responses by McDowell himself to explore the central themes of one of the most innovative philosophers of our day. Provides original and critical essays examining McDowell’s reading and appropriation of Sellars, Kant, and Hegel in his own philosophy Explores McDowell’s notions of perceptual experience and his proposed rethinking of our conception of nature in light of the challenges that reason and normativity introduce (...)
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  48. Jakob Lindgaard (2008). John Mcdowell: Experience, Norm, and Nature. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _John McDowell: Experience, Norm, and Nature_ combines original essays by leading contemporary philosophers with point by point responses by McDowell himself to explore the central themes of one of the most innovative philosophers of our day. Provides original and critical essays examining McDowell’s reading and appropriation of Sellars, Kant, and Hegel in his own philosophy Explores McDowell’s notions of perceptual experience and his proposed rethinking of our conception of nature in light of the challenges that reason and normativity introduce (...)
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  49. Chauncey Maher (2014). The Pittsburgh School of Philosophy: Sellars, Mcdowell, Brandom. Routledge.
    In this volume, Maher contextualizes the work of a group of contemporary analytic philosophers—The Pittsburgh School—whose work is characterized by an interest in the history of philosophy and a commitment to normative functionalism, or the insight that to identify something as a manifestation of conceptual capacities is to place it in a space of norms. Wilfrid Sellars claimed that humans are distinctive because they occupy a norm-governed "space of reasons." Along with Sellars, Robert Brandom and John McDowell have tried (...)
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  50.  19
    Eric S. Schliesser (2002). Indispensable Hume: From Isaac Newton's Natural Philosophy to Adam Smith's "Science of Man". Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    Chapter one is an introduction. In chapter two, I argue that, due to a lack of knowledge of Newton, Hume is unable to use the "Science of Man" to provide a foundation for the other sciences. Hume's account of causality and the missing shade of blue receive special attention. Hume tries, without paying attention to scientific practice, to constrain what science can be about. ;In chapter three, I reconstruct Adam Smith's epistemology. The major theoretical concept of Smith's moral psychology, the (...)
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