Search results for 'Norman Dale Norris' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Greg J. Norman, Catherine J. Norris, Jackie Gollan, Tiffany A. Ito, Louise C. Hawkley, Jeff T. Larsen, John T. Cacioppo & Gary G. Berntson (2011). Current Emotion Research in Psychophysiology: The Neurobiology of Evaluative Bivalence. Emotion Review 3 (3):349-359.
    Evaluative processes have their roots in early evolutionary history, as survival is dependent on an organism’s ability to identify and respond appropriately to positive, rewarding or otherwise salubrious stimuli as well as to negative, noxious, or injurious stimuli. Consequently, evaluative processes are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom and are represented at multiple levels of the nervous system, including the lowest levels of the neuraxis. While evolution has sculpted higher level evaluative systems into complex and sophisticated information-processing networks, they do not (...)
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  2.  50
    Norman Dale Norris (2004). The Promise and Failure of Progressive Education. Scarecroweducation.
    What is progressive education? -- Origins of progressive education -- Progressive education in action: what really happens -- Broken promises: why progressive education has failed to deliver -- Making progressive education work: perspectives, conclusions, and recommendations.
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  3.  48
    Christopher Norris & Marianna Papastephanou (2002). Deconstruction, Anti–Realism and Philosophy of Science—an Interview with Christopher Norris. Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):265–289.
    In this interview, Christopher Norris discusses a wide range of issues having to do with postmodernism, deconstruction and other controversial topics of debate within present-day philosophy and critical theory. More specifically he challenges the view of deconstruction as just another offshoot of the broader postmodernist trend in cultural studies and the social sciences. Norris puts the case for deconstruction as continuing the 'unfinished project of modernity' and—in particular—for Derrida's work as sustaining the values of enlightened critical reason in (...)
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  4.  4
    Richard Norman (2004). Can There Be a Just War?: Norman Can There Be a Just War? Think 3 (8):7-16.
    Richard Norman examines justifications for war that are rooted in the right of self-defence.
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  5.  5
    Paola Marrati, Andrew Norris, Jörg Volbers, Cary Wolfe & Thomas Dumm (2012). The Political Theory of Stanley Cavell: The Ordinary Life of Democracy Paola Marrati Skepticism, Finitude and Politics in the Work of Stanley Cavell Andrew Norris Crossing the Bounds of Sense: Cavell and Foucault Jörg Volbers Cavell's 'Forms of Life' and Biopolitics Cary Wolfe Misgiving, or Cavell's Gift Thomas Dumm Responses. Contemporary Political Theory 11 (4):397-429.
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  6.  5
    Lorenzo Imbesi, Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman & Derrick de Kerckhove (2010). Technology, Crisis, and Interaction Design: A Conversation with Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman, and Derrick de Kerckhove. Mediatropes 2 (2):128-135.
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  7. G. E. Appelbe, J. Wingfield & J. R. Dale (1993). Dale and Appelbe's Pharmacy Law and Ethics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  8. Richard Norman (1982). The Primacy of Practice: ‘Intelligent Idealism’ in Marxist Thought1: Richard Norman. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:155-179.
    The chief defect of all previous materialism is that things, reality, the sensible world, are conceived only in the form of objects of observation , but not as human sense activity , not as practical activity , not subjectively. Hence, in opposition to materialism, the active side was developed abstractly by idealism, which of course does not know real sense activity as such.
     
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  9. Christopher Norris (1984). The Deconstructive Turn Essays in the Rhetoric of Philosophy /Christopher Norris. --. --. Methuen,, C1983 1984.
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  10.  20
    Piers Norris Turner (2013). Dale E. Miller, J. S. Mill: Moral, Social and Political Thought (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010), Pp. Viii + 252. Utilitas 25 (4):504-506.
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  11.  39
    Norman R. Gall (2000). John D. Greenwood, Ed., the Future of Folk Psychology: Intentionality and Cognitive Science; Scott M. Christensen and Dale R. Turner, Eds., Folk Psychology and the Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (3):416-423.
  12. Samantha Brennan, Claudia Card, Bernard Dauenhauer, Marilyn A. Friedman, Dale Jamieson, Richard Arneson, Clark Wolf, Robert Nagle, James Nickel, Christoph Fehige & Norman Daniels (2000). The Idea of a Political Liberalism: Essays on Rawls. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this unique volume, some of today's most eminent political philosophers examine the thought of John Rawls, focusing in particular on his most recent work. These original essays explore diverse issues, including the problem of pluralism, the relationship between constitutive commitment and liberal institutions, just treatment of dissident minorities, the constitutional implications of liberalism, international relations, and the structure of international law. The first comprehensive study of Rawls's recent work, The Idea of Political Liberalism will be indispensable for political philosophers (...)
     
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  13.  35
    Joseph Lacey (2012). Climate Change and Norman Daniels' Theory of Just Health: An Essay on Basic Needs. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):3-14.
    Norman Daniels, in applying Rawls’ theory of justice to the issue of human health, ideally presupposes that society exists in a state of moderate scarcity. However, faced with problems like climate change, many societies find that their state of moderate scarcity is increasingly under threat. The first part of this essay aims to determine the consequences for Daniels’ theory of just health when we incorporate into Rawls’ understanding of justice the idea that the condition of moderate scarcity can fail. (...)
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  14. Norman W. Weissman, Jeroan J. Allison, Catarina I. Kiefe, Robert M. Farmer, Michael T. Weaver, O. Dale Williams, Ian G. Child, Judy H. Pemberton, Kathleen C. Brown & C. Suzanne Baker (1999). Achievable Benchmarks of Care: The ABCTMs of Benchmarking. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (3):269-281.
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  15.  7
    Ronnie Lippens (2014). Compleat Contemplators and Pertinacious Schismaticks: Speculations on the Clash of Two Imaginary Sovereignties at Dale Farm and Meriden. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (4):565-584.
    In this essay two photographs taken during the events at Dale Farm and at Meriden—both involving issues of gypsy and traveller settlement in rural areas—are analysed and interpreted in some depth. Use is thereby made of Izaak Walton’s The Compleat Angler . This book, as is argued in this contribution, includes, in embryonic form, a whole imaginary of forms of sovereignty which, it could be said, is still to a significant extent structuring conflicts between gypsy and traveller communities on (...)
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  16.  7
    Katherine Hirschfeld (2012). Cuban Cure Falls Short. Metascience 21 (3):763-766.
    Cuban cure falls short Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9620-7 Authors Katherine Hirschfeld, Department of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, 455 West Lindsey, Dale Hall Tower, Norman, OK 73019, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  17. Friedrich Hügel, Norman Kemp Smith & Lawrence F. Barmann (1981). The Letters of Baron Friedrich von Hügel and Professor Norman Kemp Smith. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  18.  6
    W. J. Mander (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of John Norris. Oxford University Press.
    Life, work, and influences -- Life -- Work -- Influences -- Metaphysics -- The intelligible world -- The existence of the intelligible world -- The intelligible and the divine world -- The intelligible and the natural world -- Knowledge -- Mind and body -- The souls of animals -- Knowledge : thought and souls -- Knowledge : God -- Mediate knowledge : external world -- Discussion and assessment of Norris's theory -- Was Norris an idealist? -- Faith and (...)
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  19.  64
    Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E. Moore, Norman Malcolm & Gabriel Citron (2015). A Discussion Between Wittgenstein and Moore on Certainty : From the Notes of Norman Malcolm. Mind 124 (493):73-84.
    In April 1939, G. E. Moore read a paper to the Cambridge University Moral Science Club entitled ‘Certainty’. In it, amongst other things, Moore made the claims that: the phrase ‘it is certain’ could be used with sense-experience-statements, such as ‘I have a pain’, to make statements such as ‘It is certain that I have a pain’; and that sense-experience-statements can be said to be certain in the same sense as some material-thing-statements can be — namely in the sense that (...)
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  20.  34
    Norris Clarke (1999). The Thomism of Norris Clarke. Philosophy and Theology 11 (2):265-285.
    William Norris Clarke, S.J., one of the leading Thomist scholars in the United States, came to the Philippines recently and delivered a series of lectures in the Ateneo de Manila University and the University of Santo Tomas on various philosophical topics inspired by the thought of St. Thomas. Fr. Clarke is now a Professor Emeritus of Philosophy in Fordham University. He was co-founder and editor (l961-85) of the International Philosophical Quarterly and is the author of some 60 articles, plus (...)
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  21. W. Norris Clarke & Gerald A. McCool (eds.) (1988). The Universe as Journey: Conversations with W. Norris Clarke, S.J. Fordham University Press.
    W. Norris Clarke's metaphysics of the universe as a journey rests on six major positions: the unrestricted dynamism of the mind, the primacy of the act of existence, the participation structure of reality, and the person, considered as both the starting point of philosophy and the source of the categories needed for a flexible contemporary metaphysics. Reflecting on his conscious life and the universe around him, the finite person mounts by a two-fold path to its Infinite source, who, though (...)
     
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  22. Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2008). Incorporating the Corporation in Citizenship: A Response to Néron and Norman. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):27-33.
    This article presents a response to Néron and Norman’s contention that the language of citizenship is helpful in thinking about the political dimensions of corporate responsibilities. We argue that Néron and Norman’s main conclusions are valid but offer an extension of their analysis to incorporate extant streams of literature dealing with the political role of the corporation. We also propose that the perspective on citizenship adopted by Néron and Norman is rather narrow, andtherefore provide some alternative ways (...)
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  23.  9
    Harmen Ghijsen (2016). Norman and Truetemp Revisited Reliabilistically: A Proper Functionalist Defeat Account of Clairvoyance. Episteme 13 (1):89-110.
    The cases of Norman the Clairvoyant and Mr. Truetemp form classic counterexamples to the process reliabilist's claim that reliability is sufficient for prima facie justification. I discuss several ways in which contemporary reliabilists have tried to deal with these counterexamples, and argue that they are all unsuccessful. Instead, I propose that the most promising route lies with an appeal to a specific kind of higher-order defeat that is best cashed out in terms of properly functioning monitoring mechanisms.
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  24.  11
    Kristjan Laasik (2015). Norman Sieroka: Leibniz, Husserl, and the Brain. [REVIEW] Phenomenological Reviews.
    Norman Sieroka’s book is about “the systematic, structural relations between phenomenological and (neuro)physiological aspects of perception, consciousness, and time, with a specific focus on hearing” (p. 4), based on Leibniz’s and Husserl’s views. While Sieroka displays a great depth of knowledge in his discussions of these two philosophers, his main aims are not exegetic, but consist, rather, in casting new light on the said philosophical and interdisciplinary issues. However, the scope of his interpretative project is ambitious. There is, on (...)
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  25.  41
    Michael C. Rea (2005). Naturalism and Ontology: A Reply to Dale Jacquette. Faith and Philosophy 22 (3):343-357.
    In World Without Design: The Ontological Consequences of Naturalism, I argued that there is an important sense in which naturalism’s current status as methodological orthodoxy is without rational foundation, and I argued that naturalists must give up two views that many of them are inclined to hold dear—realism about material objects and materialism. In a review recently published in Faith and Philosophy, Dale Jacquette alleges that my arguments in World Without Design are directed mainly against strawmen and that I (...)
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  26. James Anderson (2005). In Defence of Mystery: A Reply to Dale Tuggy. Religious Studies 41 (2):145-163.
    In a recent article, Dale Tuggy argues that the two most favoured approaches to explicating the doctrine of the Trinity, Social Trinitarianism and Latin Trinitarianism, are unsatisfactory on either logical or biblical grounds. Moreover, he contends that appealing to ‘mystery’ in the face of apparent contradiction is rationally and theologically unacceptable. I raise some critical questions about Tuggy's assessment of the most relevant biblical data, before defending against his objections the rationality of an appeal to mystery in the face (...)
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  27.  20
    Qiufang Fu, Zoltán Dienes & Xiaolan Fu (2010). The Distinction Between Intuition and Guessing in the SRT Task Generation: A Reply to Norman and Price. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):478-480.
    We investigated the extent to which people could generate sequences of responses based on knowledge acquired from the Serial Reaction Time task, depending on whether it felt subjectively like the response was based on pure guessing, intuition, conscious rules or memories. Norman and Price argued that in the context of our task, intuition responses were the same as guessing responses. In reply, we argue that not only do subjects apparently claim to be experiencing different phenomenologies when saying intuition versus (...)
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  28.  14
    Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann (eds.) (1993). Reasoned Faith: Essays in Philosophical Theology in Honor of Norman Kretzmann. Cornell University Press.
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  29.  11
    T. M. Wilkinson (2008). Norman Daniels. Just Health. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. 397 + Ix Pp. Public Health Ethics 1 (3):phn028.
    Just Health, by the well-known American philosopher Norman Daniels, has the ambitious goal of presenting `an integrated theory of justice and population health, to address a set of theoretical and real-world challenges to that theory, and to demonstrate that the theory can guide our practice with regard to health both here and abroad.’ (1)1 Daniels's fundamental question is what we owe each other in the way of the protection and promotion of health. He thinks this is fruitfully dealt with (...)
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  30.  77
    Michele Loi, What Concept of Disease Should Politicians Use? Norman Daniels and the Unjustifiable Appeal of Naturalistic Analyses of Health.
    Norman Daniels argues that health is important for justice because it affects the distribution of opportunities. He claims that a just society should guarantee fair opportunities by promoting and restoring the “normal functioning” of its citizens, that is, their health. The scope of citizens' mutual obligations with respect to health is defined by a reasonable agreement that, according to Daniels, should be based on the distinction between normal functioning and pathology drawn by the biomedical sciences. This paper deals with (...)
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  31.  56
    Jamie Morgan (2011). The Significance of the Mathematics of Infinity for Realism: Norris on Badiou. Journal of Critical Realism 10 (2):243-270.
    The following essay sets out the background developments in mathematics and set theory that inform Alain Badiou’s Being and Event in order to provide some context both for the original text and for comment on Chris Norris’s excellent exploration of Badiou’s work. I also provide a summary of Badiou’s overall approach.
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  32.  25
    Andrew C. Wicks (1990). Norman Bowie and Richard Rorty on Multinationals: Does Business Ethics Need 'Metaphysical Comfort?'. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (3):191 - 200.
    Norman Bowie wrote an article on the moral obligations of multinational corporations in 1987. This paper is a response to Bowie, but more importantly, it is designed to articulate the force and substance of the pragmatist philosophy developed by Richard Rorty. In his article, Bowie suggested that moral universalism (which he endorses) is the only credible method of doing business ethics across cultures and that cultural relativism and ethnocentrism are not. Bowie, in a manner surprisingly common among contemporary philosophers, (...)
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  33.  53
    John F. Wippel (2003). Norman Kretzmann on Aquinas's Attribution of Will and of Freedom to Create to God. Religious Studies 39 (3):287-298.
    The purpose of this paper is to discuss Norman Kretzmann's account of Aquinas's discussion of will in God. According to Kretzmann, Aquinas's reasoning seems to leave no place for choice on God's part, since, on Aquinas's account, God is not free not to will Himself. And so this leads to the problem about God's willing things other than Himself. On this, Kretzmann finds serious problems with Thomas's position. Kretzmann argues that Aquinas should have drawn necessitarian conclusions from his account (...)
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  34.  8
    Bruce R. O'Brien (1996). From Morðor to Murdrum: The Preconquest Origin and Norman Revival of the Murder Fine. Speculum 71 (2):321-357.
    What was the English opinion of the Normans who had conquered them in 1066? Perhaps it makes better sense to ask, What did they see when they beheld one of their new Norman lords? Were the Normans seen as oppressive? If so, in what way and with what result? Can it be said that the Normans' treatment of their new subjects was any different from the treatment ceorlas had received from eorlas and thegnas before 1066? There can be no (...)
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  35.  14
    T. M. Wilkinson (2008). Norman Daniels. Just Health. Public Health Ethics 1 (3):268-272.
    Just Health, by the well-known American philosopher Norman Daniels, has the ambitious goal of presenting ‘an integrated theory of justice and population health, to address a set of theoretical and real-world challenges to that theory, and to demonstrate that the theory can guide our practice with regard to health both here and abroad.’ (1)1 Daniels's fundamental question is what we owe each other in the way of the protection and promotion of health. He thinks this is fruitfully dealt with (...)
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  36.  18
    S. Brauer (2009). Age Rationing and Prudential Lifespan Account in Norman Daniels' Just Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (1):27-31.
    Could age be a valid criterion for rationing? In Just health, Norman Daniels argues that under certain circumstances age rationing is prudent, and therefore a morally permissible strategy to tackle the problem of resource scarcity. Crucial to his argument is the distinction between two problem-settings of intergenerational equity: equity among age groups and equity among birth cohorts. While fairness between age groups can involve unequal benefit treatment in different life stages, fairness between birth cohorts implies enjoying approximate equality in (...)
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  37.  47
    Jeff Malpas (2004). Holism, Realism, and Truth: How to Be an Anti-Relativist and Not Give Up on Heidegger (or Davidson) - a Debate with Christopher Norris. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):339 – 356.
    Responding to criticisms raised by Christopher Norris, this paper defends an anti-relativist reading of the work of both Davidson and Heidegger arguing that that there are important lessons to be learnt from their example - one can thus be an anti-relativist (as well as a certain sort of realist) without giving up on Davidson or on Heidegger.
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  38.  41
    Matt Lamkin (2011). Racist Appearance Standards and the Enhancements That Love Them: Norman Daniels and Skin-Lightening Cosmetics. Bioethics 25 (4):185-191.
    Darker skin correlates with reduced opportunities and negative health outcomes. Recent discoveries related to the genes associated with skin tone, and the historical use of cosmetics to conform to racist appearance standards, suggest effective skin-lightening products may soon become available. This article examines whether medical interventions of this sort should be permitted, subsidized, or restricted, using Norman Daniels's framework for determining what justice requires in terms of protecting health. I argue that Daniels's expansive view of the requirements of justice (...)
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  39.  10
    Jerry Gill (2012). Response to David Rutledge and Dale Cannon. Tradition and Discovery 39 (1):71-73.
    This response to review essays (covering all of my major scholarly writing) by David Rutledge and Dale Cannon appreciatively affirms most points emphasized in their respective analyses. I acknowledge that my scholarship has served my teaching, as Rutledge notes; I frequently use diagrams because I believe they usually are pedagogically very effective. My writing has strong interdisciplinary overtones and I have special interest in religion, art and education. Slowly, I have worked to integrate the ideas of Polanyi and other (...)
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  40.  7
    C. W. Freeman (1996). What Shall We Do with Norman? An Experiment in Communal Discernment. Christian Bioethics 2 (1):16-41.
    We were a group of Christian friends searching for affirmations that lay at the heart of our faith and reached to the limits of our existence and moral authority. As we have reflected on our role in deciding whether and to what extent we could assist in allowing our terminally ill friend, seventy-nine-year-old, Norman to die, we were deeply troubled by the moral ambiguity of our involvement. Through a careful process of authority through communal discernment, our responsibility for (...) became clear: we were to assist him in living the life he embraced in baptism — a life which included a destiny that was conformed to the crucified and risen one. That was not the destiny we chose for Norman; it was the destiny he owned. We recognized with Norman that our lives are not our own to be guided by autonomy and liberty, but rather to be lived for the glory of Jesus the Christ. (shrink)
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  41.  12
    Constance B. Hieatt & Robin F. Jones (1986). Two Anglo-Norman Culinary Collections Edited From British Library Manuscripts Additional 32085 and Royal 12.C.Xii. Speculum 61 (4):859-882.
    The earliest English culinary recipes occur in two Anglo-Norman manuscripts, both in the British Library: Additional 32085 and Royal 12.C.xii. A transcription of the latter, with a few footnotes citing recipes in the former, was published by Paul Meyer in 1893 . Meyer proposed to publish a full version of the earlier manuscript at a later date, but he never did. No new Anglo-Norman collections have turned up since that time, although we have searched in a great number (...)
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  42.  33
    Anthony Skelton (2001). Review of Dale Jamieson (Ed.), Singer and His Critics. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (4):574 – 576.
    This is a review of Singer and His Critics edited by Dale Jamieson. It argues that the volume is important. The essay by Colin McGinn is heavily criticized.
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  43.  19
    Norman Kretzmann, Scott MacDonald & Eleonore Stump (eds.) (1998). Aquinas's Moral Theory: Essays in Honor of Norman Kretzmann. Cornell University Press.
    This volume explores the ethical dimensions of a wide selection of philosophical and theological topics in Aquinas's texts.
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  44.  20
    T. Wilkinson (2008). Norman Daniels. Just Health. Public Health Ethics 1 (3):268-272.
    Just Health, by the well-known American philosopher Norman Daniels, has the ambitious goal of presenting ‘an integrated theory of justice and population health, to address a set of theoretical and real-world challenges to that theory, and to demonstrate that the theory can guide our practice with regard to health both here and abroad.’ (1)1 Daniels's fundamental question is what we owe each other in the way of the protection and promotion of health. He thinks this is fruitfully dealt with (...)
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  45.  21
    F. Janet (2007). Review of J. Norman, After Euclid: Visual Reasoning and the Epistemology of Diagrams. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 15 (1):116-121.
    This monograph treats the important topic of the epistemology of diagrams in Euclidean geometry. Norman argues that diagrams play a genuine justificatory role in traditional Euclidean arguments, and he aims to account for these roles from a modified Kantian perspective. Norman considers himself a semi-Kantian in the following broad sense: he believes that Kant was right that ostensive constructions are necessary in order to follow traditional Euclidean proofs, but he wants to avoid appealing to Kantian a priori intuition (...)
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  46.  24
    Michael Kremer (2008). Review of Gottlob Frege, Dale Jacquette (Tr.), The Foundations of Arithmetic. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (1).
    Last spring, as I was beginning a graduate seminar on Frege, I received a complimentary copy of this new translation of his masterwork, The Foundations of Arithmetic . I had ordered Austin's famous translation, well-loved for the beauty of its English and the clarity with which it presents Frege's overall argument, but known to be less than literal, and to sometimes supplement translation with interpretation. I was intrigued by Dale Jacquette's promise "to combine literal accuracy and readability for beginning (...)
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  47.  15
    Dennis Mckerlie (1989). Justice Between Age-Groups: A Comment on Norman Daniels. Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):227-234.
    ABSTRACT Norman Daniels suggests that the just distribution of resources between different age‐groups is determined by the choice a prudential agent would make in budgeting resources over the different temporal stages of a single life. He calls this view the “prudential lifespan account” of justice between age‐groups. Daniels thinks that the view recommends a rough kind of equality in resources between age‐groups. I argue that in the case of a single life prudence would choose an unequal distribution of resources. (...)
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  48.  4
    Monika Otter (1999). 1066: The Moment of Transition in Two Narratives of the Norman Conquest. Speculum 74 (3):565-586.
    The year 1066, touted in the British humor classic 1066 and All That as one of only two truly “historical” dates , has assumed for us the character of a watershed in English history, a crucial moment of change and transformation. Indeed, the date is so memorable that the number 1066 itself can stand on its own, metonymically implying the Battle of Hastings, the accession of William to the English throne, the Norman Conquest, the end of Anglo-Saxon culture, the (...)
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  49.  3
    Norman J. Brown (1979). Psychological Egoism Revisited: Norman J. Brown. Philosophy 54 (209):293-309.
    Psychological egoism is, I suppose, regarded by most philosophers as one of the more simple-minded fallacies in the history of philosophy, and dangerous and seductive too, contriving as it does to combine cynicism about human ideals and a vague sense of scientific method, both of which make the ordinary reader feel sophisticated, with conceptual confusion, which he cannot resist. For all of these reasons it springs eternal, in one form or another, in the breasts of first-year students, and offers excellent (...)
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  50. Norman Finkelstein (2003). Uses and Misuses of Memory: Notes on Peter Novick and Norman Finkelstein. Historical Materialism 11 (2):215-225.
     
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