Search results for 'Norman Dale Norris' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Greg J. Norman, Catherine J. Norris, Jackie Gollan, Tiffany A. Ito, Louise C. Hawkley, Jeff T. Larsen, John T. Cacioppo & Gary G. Berntson (2011). Current Emotion Research in Psychophysiology: The Neurobiology of Evaluative Bivalence. Emotion Review 3 (3):349-359.
    Evaluative processes have their roots in early evolutionary history, as survival is dependent on an organism’s ability to identify and respond appropriately to positive, rewarding or otherwise salubrious stimuli as well as to negative, noxious, or injurious stimuli. Consequently, evaluative processes are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom and are represented at multiple levels of the nervous system, including the lowest levels of the neuraxis. While evolution has sculpted higher level evaluative systems into complex and sophisticated information-processing networks, they do not (...)
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  2.  49
    Norman Dale Norris (2004). The Promise and Failure of Progressive Education. Scarecroweducation.
    What is progressive education? -- Origins of progressive education -- Progressive education in action: what really happens -- Broken promises: why progressive education has failed to deliver -- Making progressive education work: perspectives, conclusions, and recommendations.
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  3.  47
    Christopher Norris & Marianna Papastephanou (2002). Deconstruction, Anti–Realism and Philosophy of Science—an Interview with Christopher Norris. Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):265–289.
    In this interview, Christopher Norris discusses a wide range of issues having to do with postmodernism, deconstruction and other controversial topics of debate within present-day philosophy and critical theory. More specifically he challenges the view of deconstruction as just another offshoot of the broader postmodernist trend in cultural studies and the social sciences. Norris puts the case for deconstruction as continuing the 'unfinished project of modernity' and—in particular—for Derrida's work as sustaining the values of enlightened critical reason (...)
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  4.  4
    Richard Norman (2004). Can There Be a Just War?: Norman Can There Be a Just War? Think 3 (8):7-16.
    Richard Norman examines justifications for war that are rooted in the right of self-defence.
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  5.  4
    Paola Marrati, Andrew Norris, Jörg Volbers, Cary Wolfe & Thomas Dumm (2012). The Political Theory of Stanley Cavell: The Ordinary Life of Democracy Paola Marrati Skepticism, Finitude and Politics in the Work of Stanley Cavell Andrew Norris Crossing the Bounds of Sense: Cavell and Foucault Jörg Volbers Cavell's 'Forms of Life' and Biopolitics Cary Wolfe Misgiving, or Cavell's Gift Thomas Dumm Responses. Contemporary Political Theory 11 (4):397-429.
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  6. G. E. Appelbe, J. Wingfield & J. R. Dale (1993). Dale and Appelbe's Pharmacy Law and Ethics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  7.  4
    Lorenzo Imbesi, Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman & Derrick de Kerckhove (2010). Technology, Crisis, and Interaction Design: A Conversation with Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman, and Derrick de Kerckhove. Mediatropes 2 (2):128-135.
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  8. Richard Norman (1982). The Primacy of Practice: ‘Intelligent Idealism’ in Marxist Thought1: Richard Norman. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:155-179.
    The chief defect of all previous materialism is that things, reality, the sensible world, are conceived only in the form of objects of observation , but not as human sense activity , not as practical activity , not subjectively. Hence, in opposition to materialism, the active side was developed abstractly by idealism, which of course does not know real sense activity as such.
     
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  9. Christopher Norris (1984). The Deconstructive Turn Essays in the Rhetoric of Philosophy /Christopher Norris. --. --. Methuen,, C1983 1984.
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  10.  5
    E. Norman, M. Price, S. Duff & R. Mentzoni (2007). Gradations of Awareness in a Modified Sequence Learning Task. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):809-837.
    We argue performance in the serial reaction time task is associated with gradations of awareness that provide examples of fringe consciousness [Mangan, B. . Taking phenomenology seriously: the “fringe” and its implications for cognitive research. Consciousness and Cognition, 2, 89–108, Mangan, B. . The conscious “fringe”: Bringing William James up to date. In B. J. Baars, W. P. Banks & J. B. Newman , Essential sources in the scientific study of consciousness . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.], and address limitations (...)
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  11.  23
    Richard Norman (1995). Ethics, Killing, and War. Cambridge University Press.
    Can war ever be justified? Why is it wrong to kill? In this new book Richard Norman looks at these and other related questions, and thereby examines the possibility and nature of rational moral argument. Practical examples, such as the Gulf War and the Falklands War, are used to show that, whilst moral philosophy can offer no easy answers, it is a worthwhile enterprise which sheds light on many pressing contemporary problems. A combination of lucid exposition and original argument (...)
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  12.  26
    Dennis Norris, James M. McQueen & Anne Cutler (2000). Merging Information in Speech Recognition: Feedback is Never Necessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):299-325.
    Top-down feedback does not benefit speech recognition; on the contrary, it can hinder it. No experimental data imply that feedback loops are required for speech recognition. Feedback is accordingly unnecessary and spoken word recognition is modular. To defend this thesis, we analyse lexical involvement in phonemic decision making. TRACE (McClelland & Elman 1986), a model with feedback from the lexicon to prelexical processes, is unable to account for all the available data on phonemic decision making. The modular Race model (Cutler (...)
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  13. Christopher Norris (2000). Minding the Gap Epistemology & Philosophy of Science in the Two Traditions.
    In this sweeping volume, Christopher Norris challenges the view that there is no room for productive engagement between mainstream analytic philosophers and thinkers In the post-Kantian continental line of descent. On the contrary, he argues, this view is simply the product of a limiting perspective that accompanied the rise of logical positivism. Norris reveals the various shared concerns that have often been obscured by parochial interests or the desire to stake out separate philosophical territory. He examines the problems (...)
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  14.  41
    Christopher Norris (2000). Quantum Theory and the Flight From Realism: Philosophical Responses to Quantum Mechanics. Routledge.
    Quantum Theory and the Flight from Realism is a critical introduction to the long-standing debate concerning the conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics, and the problems it has posed for physicists and philosophers from Einstein to the present. Quantum theory has been a major influence on postmodernism, and presents significant challenges for realists. Clarifying these debates for the non-specialist, Christopher Norris examines the premises of orthodox quantum theory and its impact on various philosophical developments. He subjects a wide range of (...)
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  15.  33
    Christopher Norris (1993). The Truth About Postmodernism. Blackwell.
    This book was written with a view to sorting our some of the muddles and misreadings - especially misreadings of Kant - that have charaterized recent postmodernist and post-structuralist thought. For these issues have a relevance, as Norris argues, far beyond the academic enclaves of philosophy, literary theory, and cultural criticism. Thus he makes large claims for the importance of getting Kant right on the relation between epistemology, ethics and aesthetics; for pursuing the Kantian question 'What is Enlightenment?' as (...)
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  16.  27
    Christopher Norris (2004). Philosophy of Language and the Challenge to Scientific Realism. Routledge.
    In this book Christopher Norris develops the case for scientific realism by tackling various adversary arguments from a range of anti-realist positions. Through a close critical reading he shows how they fail to make adequate sense on any rational, consistent and scientifically informed survey of the evidence. Along the way he incorporates a number of detailed case-studies from the history and philosophy of science. Norris devotes much of his discussion to some of the most prominent and widely influential (...)
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  17. Christopher Norris (1990). What's Wrong with Postmodernism: Critical Theory and the Ends of Philosophy. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In What's Wrong with Postmodernism Norris critiques the "postmodern-pragmatist malaise" of Baudrillard, Fish, Rorty, and Lyotard. In contrast he finds a continuing critical impulse--an "enlightened or emancipatory interest"--in thinkers like Derrida, de Man, Bhaskar, and Habermas. Offering a provocative reassessment of Derrida's influence on modern thinking, Norris attempts to sever the tie between deconstruction and American literary critics who, he argues, favor endless, playful, polysemic interpretation at the expense of systematic argument. As he explores leftist attempts to (...)
     
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  18.  5
    Richard Norman (1987). Free and Equal: A Philosophical Examination of Political Values. Oxford University Press.
    The concepts of freedom and equality lie at the heart of much contemporary political debate. But how, exactly, are these concepts to be understood? And do they really represent desirable political values? Norman begins from the premise that freedom and equality are rooted in human experience, and thus have a real and objective content. He then argues that the attempt to clarify these concepts is therefore not just a matter of idle philosophical speculation, but also a matter of practical (...)
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  19. Christopher Norris (2000). Deconstruction and the 'Unfinished Project of Modernity'. Routledge.
    Through a close engagement with some key thinkers, Norris argues that deconstruction is part of the "unfinished project of modernity." a project whose interest and values it upholds by continuing to question them in a spirit of enlightened self-critical inquiry.
     
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  20.  48
    Andrew Norris (ed.) (2005). Politics, Metaphysics, and Death: Essays on Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer. Duke University Press.
    "Andrew Norris and the contributors to this collection have not only performed extraordinary feats of textual exegesis but also produced a critical context and ...
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  21.  4
    Richard Norman (2004). On Humanism. Routledge.
    humanism /'hju:menizm/ n. an outlook or system of thought concerned with human rather than divine or supernatural matters. Albert Einstein, Isaac Asimov, E.M. Forster, Bertrand Russell, and Gloria Steinem all declared themselves humanists. What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century's crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical (...)
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  22.  17
    Richard Norman (2004). Can There Be a Just War? Think 3 (8):7.
    Richard Norman examines justifications for war that are rooted in the right of self-defence.
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  23. Christopher Norris (2002). Deconstruction: Theory and Practice. Routledge.
    _Deconstruction: Theory and Practice_ has been acclaimed as by far the most readable, concise and authoritative guide to this topic. Without oversimplifying or glossing over the challenges, Norris makes deconstruction more accessible to the reader. The volume focuses on the works of Jacques Derrida which caused this seismic shift in critical thought, as well as the work of North American critics Paul de Man, Geoffrey Hartman, J. Hillis Miller and Harold Bloom. In this third, revised edition, Norris builds (...)
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  24.  10
    Richard Norman (2003). Swinburne's Arguments From Design. Think 2 (4):35.
    In issue one, Richard Swinburne presented two ingenious versions of the argument from design. Here, Richard Norman questions both arguments.
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  25.  19
    Elisabeth Norman, Mark C. Price, Emma Jones & Zoltan Dienes (2011). Strategic Control in AGL is Not Attributable to Simple Letter Frequencies Alone. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1933-1934.
    In Norman, Price, and Jones , we argued that the ability to apply two sets of grammar rules flexibly from trial to trial on a “mixed-block” AGL classification task indicated strategic control over knowledge that was less than fully explicit. Jiménez suggested that our results do not in themselves prove that participants learned – and strategically controlled – complex properties of the structures of the grammars, but that they may be accounted for by learning of simple letter frequencies. We (...)
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  26.  8
    Christopher Norris (2002). Hilary Putnam: Realism, Reason, and the Uses of Uncertainty. Distributed in the U.S. By Palgrave.
    In this detailed study, Christopher Norris defends the kinds of arguments advanced by the early realist, Hilary Putnam. Norris makes a point of placing Putnam's work in a wider philosophical context, and relating it to various current debates in epistemology and philosophy of science. Much like Putnam, Norris is willing to take full account of opposed viewpoints while maintaining a vigorously argued commitment to the values of debate and enquiry.
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  27. Christopher Norris (1996). Reclaiming Truth: Contribution to a Critique of Cultural Relativism. Duke University Press Books.
    Truth, Christopher Norris reminds us, is very much out of fashion at the moment whether at the hands of politicians, media pundits, or purveyors of postmodern wisdom in cultural and literary studies. Across a range of disciplines the idea has taken hold that truth-talk is either redundant or the product of epistemic might. Questions of truth and falsehood are always internal to some specific language-game; history is just another kind of fiction; philosophy is only a kind of writing; law (...)
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  28.  30
    Richard Norman (2008). Good Without God. Think 7 (20):35-46.
    In the fifth of our articles on , Richard Norman explains why he believes we can be good without God.
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  29.  7
    John Norris (2012). Laboratory Work in Early Geoscience: Changing the Story. [REVIEW] Metascience 21 (3):575-578.
    Laboratory work in early geoscience: changing the story Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9621-6 Authors John Norris, Vodni 1 A, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  30.  11
    Christopher Norris (2012). Sophist or Antiphilosopher? Journal of Critical Realism 11 (4):487-498.
    This essay takes Badiou’s recently published book as an opportunity to discuss not only his complex approach to Wittgenstein but also his evolving critical stance in relation to various other movements in present-day philosophical thought. In particular it examines his distinction between ‘sophistics’ and ‘anti-philosophy’, as developed very largely through his series of encounters with Wittgenstein. Beyond that, I offer some brief remarks about the role of set-theoretical concepts in Badiou’s thinking and the vexed question of their bearing on his (...)
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  31.  2
    Christopher Norris (1990). Paul de Man: Deconstruction and the Critique of Aesthetic Ideology. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (3):250-251.
    Paul de Man - literary critic, literary philosopher, "American deconstructionist" - changed the landscape of criticism through his rigorous theories and writings. Upon its original publication in 1988, Christopher Norris' book was the first full-length introduction to de Man, a reading that offers a much-needed corrective to the pattern of extreme antithetical response which marked the initial reception to de Man's writings. Norris addresses de Man's relationship to philosophical thinking in the post-Kantian tradition, his concern with "aesthetic ideology" (...)
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  32. Eric Michael Dale (2014). Hegel, the End of History, and the Future. Cambridge University Press.
    In Phenomenology of Spirit Hegel is often held to have announced the end of history, where 'history' is to be understood as the long pursuit of ends towards which humanity had always been striving. In this, the first book in English to thoroughly critique this entrenched view, Eric Michael Dale argues that it is a misinterpretation. Dale offers a reading of his own, showing how it sits within the larger schema of Hegel's thought and makes room for an (...)
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  33. Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Judith Norman (eds.) (2004). Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future. Cambridge University Press.
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, Nietzsche embodies (...)
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  34. Christopher Norris (2001). Deconstruction and the 'Unfinished Project of Modernity'. Routledge.
    Through a close engagement with some key thinkers, Norris argues that deconstruction is part of the "unfinished project of modernity." a project whose interest and values it upholds by continuing to question them in a spirit of enlightened self-critical inquiry.
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  35. Richard Norman (2011). Ethics, Killing and War. Cambridge University Press.
    Can war ever be justified? Why is it wrong to kill? In this new book Richard Norman looks at these and other related questions, and thereby examines the possibility and nature of rational moral argument. Practical examples, such as the Gulf War and the Falklands War, are used to show that, whilst moral philosophy can offer no easy answers, it is a worthwhile enterprise which sheds light on many pressing contemporary problems. A combination of lucid exposition and original argument (...)
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  36.  17
    Christopher Norris (2004). Language, Logic, and Epistemology: A Modal-Realist Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Norris presents a series of closely linked chapters on recent developments in epistemology, philosophy of language, cognitive science, literary theory, musicology and other related fields. While to this extent adopting an interdisciplinary approach, Norris also very forcefully challenges the view that the academic "disciplines" as we know them are so many artificial constructs of recent date and with no further role than to prop up existing divisions of intellectual labour. He makes his case through some exceptionally acute (...)
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  37. Richard Norman (2015). On Humanism. Routledge.
    What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century’s crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical defence of humanism. It is also an impassioned plea that we turn to ourselves, not religion, if we want to answer Socrates’ age-old question: what is the best kind of life to lead? (...)
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  38. Richard Norman (2012). On Humanism. Routledge.
    What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century’s crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical defence of humanism. It is also an impassioned plea that we turn to ourselves, not religion, if we want to answer Socrates’ age-old question: what is the best kind of life to lead? (...)
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  39. Christopher Norris (2010). Paul de Man : Deconstruction and the Critique of Aesthetic Ideology. Routledge.
    Paul de Man - literary critic, literary philosopher, "American deconstructionist" - changed the landscape of criticism through his rigorous theories and writings. Upon its original publication in 1988, Christopher Norris' book was the first full-length introduction to de Man, a reading that offers a much-needed corrective to the pattern of extreme antithetical response which marked the initial reception to de Man's writings. Norris addresses de Man's relationship to philosophical thinking in the post-Kantian tradition, his concern with "aesthetic ideology" (...)
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  40.  2
    Christopher Norris (2013). Philosophy Outside-In: A Critique of Academic Reason. Edinburgh University Press.
    Christopher Norris raises some basic questions about the way that academic philosophy has been conducted over the past quarter-century and, in doing so, offers a strong counter-statement to the overly specialised character of much recent work in the analytic mainstream.Topics addressed include speculative realism, the 'extended mind' hypothesis, experimental philospophy, the ontology of political song, Shakespearean language as a challenge to the norms of linguistic philosophy, and anti-realism as a antitode to epistemological scepticism. In many cases Norris shows (...)
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  41. Andrew Norris (ed.) (2005). Politics, Metaphysics, and Death: Essays on Giorgio Agamben’s Homo Sacer. Duke University Press Books.
    The Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben is having an increasingly significant impact on Anglo-American political theory. His most prominent intervention to date is the powerful reassessment of sovereignty and the politics of life and death laid out in his multivolume _Homo Sacer_ project. Agamben argues that in both the modern world and the ancient, politics inevitably involves a sovereign decision that bans some individuals from the political and human communities. For Agamben, the Nazi concentration camps—in which some inmates are reduced to (...)
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  42. Christopher Norris (2000). Quantum Theory and the Flight From Realism: Philosophical Responses to Quantum Mechanics. Routledge.
    This book is a critical introduction to the long-standing debate concerning the conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics and the problems it has posed for physicists and philosophers from Einstein to the present. Quantum theory has been a major infulence on postmodernism, and presents significant problems for realists. Keeping his own realist position in check, Christopher Norris subjects a wide range of key opponents and supporters of realism to a high and equal level of scrutiny. With a characteristic combination of (...)
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  43. Christopher Norris (2002). Quantum Theory and the Flight From Realism: Philosophical Responses to Quantum Mechanics. Routledge.
    This book is a critical introduction to the long-standing debate concerning the conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics and the problems it has posed for physicists and philosophers from Einstein to the present. Quantum theory has been a major infulence on postmodernism, and presents significant problems for realists. Keeping his own realist position in check, Christopher Norris subjects a wide range of key opponents and supporters of realism to a high and equal level of scrutiny. With a characteristic combination of (...)
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  44. Christopher Norris (2010). The Deconstructive Turn : Essays in the Rhetoric of Philosophy. Routledge.
    What might be the outcome for philosophy if its texts were subjected to the powerful techniques of rhetorical close-reading developed by current deconstructionist literary critics? When first published in 1983, Christopher Norris’ book was the first to explore such questions in the context of modern analytic and linguistic philosophy, opening up a new and challenging dimension of inter-disciplinary study and creating a fresh and productive dialogue between philosophy and literary theory.
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  45.  20
    Piers Norris Turner (2013). Dale E. Miller, J. S. Mill: Moral, Social and Political Thought (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010), Pp. Viii + 252. Utilitas 25 (4):504-506.
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  46.  37
    Norman R. Gall (2000). John D. Greenwood, Ed., the Future of Folk Psychology: Intentionality and Cognitive Science; Scott M. Christensen and Dale R. Turner, Eds., Folk Psychology and the Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (3):416-423.
  47. Samantha Brennan, Claudia Card, Bernard Dauenhauer, Marilyn A. Friedman, Dale Jamieson, Richard Arneson, Clark Wolf, Robert Nagle, James Nickel, Christoph Fehige & Norman Daniels (2000). The Idea of a Political Liberalism: Essays on Rawls. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this unique volume, some of today's most eminent political philosophers examine the thought of John Rawls, focusing in particular on his most recent work. These original essays explore diverse issues, including the problem of pluralism, the relationship between constitutive commitment and liberal institutions, just treatment of dissident minorities, the constitutional implications of liberalism, international relations, and the structure of international law. The first comprehensive study of Rawls's recent work, The Idea of Political Liberalism will be indispensable for political philosophers (...)
     
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  48.  35
    Joseph Lacey (2012). Climate Change and Norman Daniels' Theory of Just Health: An Essay on Basic Needs. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):3-14.
    Norman Daniels, in applying Rawls’ theory of justice to the issue of human health, ideally presupposes that society exists in a state of moderate scarcity. However, faced with problems like climate change, many societies find that their state of moderate scarcity is increasingly under threat. The first part of this essay aims to determine the consequences for Daniels’ theory of just health when we incorporate into Rawls’ understanding of justice the idea that the condition of moderate scarcity can fail. (...)
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  49. Norman W. Weissman, Jeroan J. Allison, Catarina I. Kiefe, Robert M. Farmer, Michael T. Weaver, O. Dale Williams, Ian G. Child, Judy H. Pemberton, Kathleen C. Brown & C. Suzanne Baker (1999). Achievable Benchmarks of Care: The ABCTMs of Benchmarking. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (3):269-281.
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  50.  7
    Ronnie Lippens (2014). Compleat Contemplators and Pertinacious Schismaticks: Speculations on the Clash of Two Imaginary Sovereignties at Dale Farm and Meriden. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (4):565-584.
    In this essay two photographs taken during the events at Dale Farm and at Meriden—both involving issues of gypsy and traveller settlement in rural areas—are analysed and interpreted in some depth. Use is thereby made of Izaak Walton’s The Compleat Angler . This book, as is argued in this contribution, includes, in embryonic form, a whole imaginary of forms of sovereignty which, it could be said, is still to a significant extent structuring conflicts between gypsy and traveller communities on (...)
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