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  1. Norman Lillegard (2011). Rick Anthony Furtak, Ed. , Kierkegaard's Concluding Unscientific Postscript: A Critical Guide . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (5):341-342.
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  2. Norman Lillegard (ed.) (2010). The Moral Domain: Guided Readings in Philosophical and Literary Texts. Oxford University Press.
    This engaging, interactive and pedagogical introduction to ethics combines the best features of a textbook and an anthology. The Moral Domain: Guided Readings in Philosophical and Literary Texts contains numerous readings from key philosophical writings in ethics along with captivating literary selections that bring the ethical issues to life. Offering extensive excerpts from major figures in the history of Western ethics--Aquinas, Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, Mill and Plato--the book also integrates work from non-Western perspectives, including selections from the Bhagavad Gita, (...)
     
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  3. Norman Lillegard (2006). Peter J. Mehl, Thinking Through Kierkegaard: Existential Identity in a Pluralistic World Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (2):112-114.
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  4. James Fieser & Norman Lillegard (eds.) (2005). Philosophical Questions: Readings and Interactive Guides. Oxford University Press.
    In Philosophical Questions: Readings and Interactive Guides, James Fieser and Norman Lillegard make classic and contemporary philosophical writings genuinely accessible to students by incorporating numerous pedagogical aids throughout the book. Presenting the readings in manageable segments, they provide commentaries that elucidate difficult passages, explain archaic or technical terminology, and expand upon allusions to unfamiliar literature and arguments. In addition, opening "First Reactions" discussion questions, study questions, logic boxes, and chapter summaries require students to delve more deeply into important issues and (...)
     
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  5. James Fieser & Norman Lillegard (2005). Philosophical Questions: Readings and Interactive Guides: Instructor's Manual and Test Questions: CD with PowerPoints. OUP USA.
    This is the Techer's Handbook (with Powerpoint slides) CD-Rom to accompany James Fieser and Norman Lillegard's Philosophical Questions: Readings and INteractive Guides. It contains chapter summaries and goals, discussion text, topical links and activities, suggestions for further readings, exam questions and answers, and Powerpoint slides.
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  6. James Fieser & Norman Lillegard (eds.) (2002). A Historical Introduction to Philosophy: Texts and Interactive Guides. Oxford University Press.
    Featuring a unique pedagogical apparatus, A Historical Introduction to Philosophy: Texts and Interactive Guides provides selections from the most influential primary works in philosophy from the Presocratics through the twentieth century, integrating them with substantial commentary and study questions. It offers extensive treatment of the Hellenistic and Renaissance periods--which are typically given only minimal coverage in other anthologies--and devotes substantial chapters to nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophy. The selections are organized historically and are presented in short and manageable sections with organizational (...)
     
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  7. Norman Lillegard (2002). Passion and Reason: Aristotelian Strategies in Kierkegaard's Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (2):251 - 273.
    Both Aristotle and Kierkegaard show that virtues result, in part, from training which produces distinctive patterns of salience. The "frame problem" in AI shows that rationality requires salience. Salience is a function of cares and desires (passions) and thus governs choice in much the way Aristotle supposes when he describes choice as deliberative desire. Since rationality requires salience it follows that rationality requires passion. Thus Kierkegaard is no more an irrationalist in ethics than is Aristotle, though he continues to be (...)
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  8. Norman Lillegard (1999). Alistair Hannay and Gordon Marino, Eds., The Cambridge Companion to Kierkegaard Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (1):20-22.
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  9. Norman Lillegard (1999). George Pattison and Steven Shakespeare, Eds., Kierkegaard: The Self in Society Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (3):218-220.
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  10. Norman Lillegard (1993). Philosophers, Theologians, and the Pluralism Problem. Philosophy and Theology 7 (4):381-403.
    Recently some theologians have argued that philosophical debates about the rationality of religious belief, such as the current evidentialism debate, are theologically irrelevant. For those debates assume the integrity of a particular religious tradition and neither provide a way of choosing between conflicting religions nor any way of sorting through conflicts which are internal to the particular religions (that is, they provide no solutions to “the pluralism problem”). In opposition to these claims I argue that the current evidentialism debate can (...)
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