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  1.  31
    Norman Malcolm (2001). Ludwig Wittgenstein: A Memoir. Clarendon Press.
    Wittgenstein was one of the most powerful influences on contemporary philosophy, yet he shunned publicity and was essentially a private man. This remarkable, vivid, personal memoir is written by one of his friends, the eminent philosopher Norman Malcolm. Reissued in paperback, this edition includes the complete text of fifty-seven letters which Wittgenstein wrote to Malcolm over a period of eleven years. Also included is a concise biographical sketch by another of Wittgenstein's philosopher friends, Georg Henrik von Wright. 'A reader does (...)
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  2.  11
    Norman Malcolm (1977). Memory and Mind. Cornell University Press.
  3. Norman Malcolm (1960). Anselm's Ontological Arguments. Philosophical Review 69 (1):41-62.
  4.  51
    David M. Armstrong & Norman Malcolm (1984). Consciousness and Causality: A Debate on the Nature of Mind. Blackwell.
  5. Norman Malcolm (1958). Knowledge of Other Minds. Journal of Philosophy 55 (September):35-52.
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  6. Norman Malcolm (1954). Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. Philosophical Review 63 (4):530-59.
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  7.  64
    Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E. Moore, Norman Malcolm & Gabriel Citron (2015). A Discussion Between Wittgenstein and Moore on Certainty : From the Notes of Norman Malcolm. Mind 124 (493):73-84.
    In April 1939, G. E. Moore read a paper to the Cambridge University Moral Science Club entitled ‘Certainty’. In it, amongst other things, Moore made the claims that: the phrase ‘it is certain’ could be used with sense-experience-statements, such as ‘I have a pain’, to make statements such as ‘It is certain that I have a pain’; and that sense-experience-statements can be said to be certain in the same sense as some material-thing-statements can be — namely in the sense that (...)
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  8. Norman Malcolm (1956). Dreaming and Skepticism. Philosophical Review 65 (January):14-37.
  9. Norman Malcolm (1973). Thoughtless Brutes. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 46 (September):5-20.
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  10. Norman Malcolm (1968). The Conceivability of Mechanism. Philosophical Review 77 (January):45-72.
  11.  46
    Norman Malcolm (1986). Nothing is Hidden: Wittgenstein's Criticism of His Early Thought. Blackwell.
  12. Norman Malcolm (1964). Moore and Ordinary Language. In V. C. Chappell (ed.), Ordinary Language: Essays in Philosophical Method. Dover Publications
     
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  13. Norman Malcolm (1989). Wittgenstein on Language and Rules. Philosophy 64 (January):5-28.
    An attempt is made to answer the question why wittgenstein might have found the analogy between speaking and playing games philosophically exciting. It is argued that on the face of it the two are strikingly disanalogous, But that on reflecting further one can find various features of games (9 are distinguished in all) which are also features of some speech episodes, And the awareness of which could be philosophically significant.
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  14. Norman Malcolm (1951). Philosophy for Philosophers. Philosophical Review 60 (3):329-340.
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  15. Norman Malcolm (1967). Wittgenstein's Philosophische Bermerkungen. Philosophical Review 76 (2):220-229.
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  16.  15
    Norman Malcolm (1994). Wittgenstein: A Religious Point of View? Cornell University Press.
    The book concludes with a critical discussion of Malcolm's essay by Peter Winch.
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  17. Norman Malcolm (1949). Defending Common Sense. Philosophical Review 58 (3):201-220.
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  18. Norman Malcolm (1963). Knowledge and Certainty. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
  19. Norman Malcolm (1952). Knowledge and Belief. Mind 61 (242):178-189.
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  20. Norman Malcolm (2000). The Groundlessness of Religious Belief. In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology. OUP Oxford
     
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  21. Norman Malcolm (1988). Subjectivity. Philosophy 63 (April):147-60.
    In his book The View from Nowhere , Thomas Nagel says that ‘the subjectivity of consciousness is an irreducible feature of reality’ . He speaks of ‘the essential subjectivity of the mental’ , and of ‘the mind's irreducibly subjective character’ . ‘Mental concepts’, he says, refer to ‘subjective points of view and their modifications’ : The subjective features of conscious mental processes—as opposed to their physical causes and effects—cannot be captured by the purified form of thought suitable for dealing with (...)
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  22.  53
    Norman Malcolm (1995). Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays, 1978-1989. Cornell University Press.
    At a time when interest in the Wittgensteinian tradition has quickened, this volume brings together fourteen essays by Norman Malcolm, a prominent philosopher ...
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  23.  74
    Norman Malcolm (1954). On Knowledge and Belief. Analysis 14 (4):94 - 98.
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  24. Norman Malcolm (1958). Ludwig Wittgenstein. New York, Oxford University Press.
  25.  98
    Norman Malcolm (1964). Scientific Materialism and the Identity Theory. Dialogue 3 (2):115-25.
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  26.  78
    Norman Malcolm (1988). Wittgenstein's Scepticism' in on Certainty. Inquiry 31 (3):277 – 293.
    This paper compares Wittgenstein's conception of ?objective certainty? with Descartes's ?metaphysical certainty?. According to both conceptions if you are certain of something in these senses, then it is inconceivable that you are mistaken. But a striking difference is that for Descartes, if you are metaphysically certain of something it follows both that the something is so and that you know it is so; whereas on Wittgenstein's conception neither thing follows. I try to show that there is a form of ?scepticism? (...)
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  27. Norman Malcolm (1977). Thought and Knowledge: Essays. Cornell University Press.
    Descartes' proof that his essence is thinking.--Thoughtless brutes.--Descartes' proof that he is essentially a non-material thing.--Behaviorism as a philosophy of psychology.--The privacy of experience.--Wittgenstein on the nature of mind.--The myth of cognitive processes and structures.--Moore and Wittgenstein on the sense of "I know."--The groundlessness of belief.
     
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  28.  72
    Norman Malcolm (1965). Descartes's Proof That His Essence is Thinking. Philosophical Review 74 (3):315-338.
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  29.  36
    Norman Malcolm (1982). Wittgenstein: The Relation of Language to Instinctive Behaviour. Philosophical Investigations 5 (1):3-22.
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  30.  72
    Norman Malcolm (1940). The Nature of Entailment. Mind 49 (195):333-347.
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  31.  56
    Norman Malcolm (1960). Critical Notice. [REVIEW] Mind 69 (273):92 - 98.
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  32.  69
    Norman Malcolm (1953). Moore's Use of "Know". Mind 62 (246):241-247.
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  33.  56
    Norman Malcolm (1953). Direct Perception. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (October):301-316.
  34.  57
    Norman Malcolm (1940). Are Necessary Propositions Really Verbal? Mind 49 (194):189-203.
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  35.  57
    Norman Malcolm (1959). Stern's Dreaming. Analysis 19 (December):47.
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  36.  57
    Norman Malcolm (1957). Dreaming and Scepticism: A Rejoinder. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 35 (December):207-211.
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  37.  32
    Norman Malcolm (1980). Kripke on Heat and Sensations of Heat. Philosophical Investigations 3 (1):12-20.
  38. Norman Malcolm (1990). Nothing Is Hidden. Erkenntnis 33 (2):270-273.
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  39. D. M. Armstrong, Norman Malcolm, Sydney Shoemaker & Richard Swinburne (1985). Consciousness and Causality. Mind 94 (374):302-306.
     
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  40. Norman Malcolm (1987). Reply to Stephen's Review. Behaviorism 15 (2):155-156.
     
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  41. Norman Malcolm (1970). Wittgenstein on the Nature of Mind. In Studies in the Theory of Knowledge. Oxford,Blackwell 9--29.
     
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  42. Norman Malcolm & Peter Winch (2002). Wittgenstein: A Religious Point of View? Routledge.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein once said: 'I am not a religious man, but I cannot help seeing every problem from a religious point of view.' This study, the last work of the distinguished philosopher Norman Malcolm, is a discussion of what Wittgenstein may have meant by this and its significance for philosophy. The book concludes with a critical discussion of Malcolm's essay by Peter Winch.
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  43.  35
    Norman Malcolm (1967). Explaining Behavior. Philosophical Review 76 (January):97-104.
  44.  10
    Norman Malcolm (1982). Wittgenstein and Idealism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 13:249-267.
    Recently some philosophers have proposed that the later philosophy of Wittgenstein tends towards idealism, or even solipsism. The solipsism is said to be of a peculiar kind. It is characterized as a ‘collective’ or ‘aggregative’ solipsism. The solipsism or idealism is also said to be ‘transcendental’. In the first part of this paper I will be examining a recent essay by Professor Bernard Williams, in which he presents what he takes to be the grounds for such an interpretation of Wittgenstein. (...)
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  45.  24
    Norman Malcolm (1963). Memory and the Past. The Monist 47 (2):247-266.
  46.  37
    Norman Malcolm (1970). Memory and Representation. Noûs 4 (February):59-71.
  47.  38
    Norman Malcolm (1965). Understanding Austin. Journal of Philosophy 62 (19):508-509.
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  48.  35
    Norman Malcolm (1963). Scientific Materialism and the Identity Theory: Comments. Journal of Philosophy 60 (22):662-663.
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  49.  28
    Norman Malcolm (1983). The Intentionality of Sense-Perception. Philosophical Investigations 6 (July):175-183.
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  50.  20
    Norman Malcolm (1992). Language Without Conversation. Philosophical Investigations 15 (3):207-214.
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