Search results for 'Norman Paton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  26
    Norman Kemp Smith, H. B. Acton, F. R. Tennant, J. Wisdom, H. J. Paton, John Laird, M. Black, J. O. Wisdom & Alban G. Widgery (1938). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 47 (188):520-539.
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  2.  3
    Sandra Orchard, Rolf Apweiler, Robert Barkovich, Dawn Field, John S. Garavelli, David Horn, Andy Jones, Philip Jones, Randall Julian, Ruth McNally, Jason Nerothin, Norman Paton, Angel Pizarro, Sean Seymour, Chris Taylor, Stefan Wiemann & Henning Hermjakob, Proteomics and Beyond : A Report on the 3rd Annual Spring Workshop of the HUPO-PSI 21-23 April 2006, San Francisco, CA, USA. [REVIEW]
    The theme of the third annual Spring workshop of the HUPO-PSI was proteomics and beyond and its underlying goal was to reach beyond the boundaries of the proteomics community to interact with groups working on the similar issues of developing interchange standards and minimal reporting requirements. Significant developments in many of the HUPO-PSI XML interchange formats, minimal reporting requirements and accompanying controlled vocabularies were reported, with many of these now feeding into the broader efforts of the Functional Genomics Experiment data (...)
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  3.  4
    Richard Norman (2004). Can There Be a Just War?: Norman Can There Be a Just War? Think 3 (8):7-16.
    Richard Norman examines justifications for war that are rooted in the right of self-defence.
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  4.  4
    Lorenzo Imbesi, Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman & Derrick de Kerckhove (2010). Technology, Crisis, and Interaction Design: A Conversation with Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman, and Derrick de Kerckhove. Mediatropes 2 (2):128-135.
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  5. Richard Norman (1982). The Primacy of Practice: ‘Intelligent Idealism’ in Marxist Thought1: Richard Norman. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:155-179.
    The chief defect of all previous materialism is that things, reality, the sensible world, are conceived only in the form of objects of observation , but not as human sense activity , not as practical activity , not subjectively. Hence, in opposition to materialism, the active side was developed abstractly by idealism, which of course does not know real sense activity as such.
     
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  6. Immanuel Kant & H. J. Paton (1966). The Moral Law or, Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals. Translated and Analysed by H. J. Paton. Hutchinson University Library.
     
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  7.  5
    E. Norman, M. Price, S. Duff & R. Mentzoni (2007). Gradations of Awareness in a Modified Sequence Learning Task. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):809-837.
    We argue performance in the serial reaction time task is associated with gradations of awareness that provide examples of fringe consciousness [Mangan, B. . Taking phenomenology seriously: the “fringe” and its implications for cognitive research. Consciousness and Cognition, 2, 89–108, Mangan, B. . The conscious “fringe”: Bringing William James up to date. In B. J. Baars, W. P. Banks & J. B. Newman , Essential sources in the scientific study of consciousness . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.], and address limitations (...)
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  8.  24
    Richard Norman (1995). Ethics, Killing, and War. Cambridge University Press.
    Can war ever be justified? Why is it wrong to kill? In this new book Richard Norman looks at these and other related questions, and thereby examines the possibility and nature of rational moral argument. Practical examples, such as the Gulf War and the Falklands War, are used to show that, whilst moral philosophy can offer no easy answers, it is a worthwhile enterprise which sheds light on many pressing contemporary problems. A combination of lucid exposition and original argument (...)
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  9.  5
    Richard Norman (1987). Free and Equal: A Philosophical Examination of Political Values. Oxford University Press.
    The concepts of freedom and equality lie at the heart of much contemporary political debate. But how, exactly, are these concepts to be understood? And do they really represent desirable political values? Norman begins from the premise that freedom and equality are rooted in human experience, and thus have a real and objective content. He then argues that the attempt to clarify these concepts is therefore not just a matter of idle philosophical speculation, but also a matter of practical (...)
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  10.  4
    Richard Norman (2004). On Humanism. Routledge.
    humanism /'hju:menizm/ n. an outlook or system of thought concerned with human rather than divine or supernatural matters. Albert Einstein, Isaac Asimov, E.M. Forster, Bertrand Russell, and Gloria Steinem all declared themselves humanists. What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century's crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical (...)
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  11.  17
    Richard Norman (2004). Can There Be a Just War? Think 3 (8):7.
    Richard Norman examines justifications for war that are rooted in the right of self-defence.
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  12.  10
    Richard Norman (2003). Swinburne's Arguments From Design. Think 2 (4):35.
    In issue one, Richard Swinburne presented two ingenious versions of the argument from design. Here, Richard Norman questions both arguments.
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  13.  19
    Elisabeth Norman, Mark C. Price, Emma Jones & Zoltan Dienes (2011). Strategic Control in AGL is Not Attributable to Simple Letter Frequencies Alone. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1933-1934.
    In Norman, Price, and Jones , we argued that the ability to apply two sets of grammar rules flexibly from trial to trial on a “mixed-block” AGL classification task indicated strategic control over knowledge that was less than fully explicit. Jiménez suggested that our results do not in themselves prove that participants learned – and strategically controlled – complex properties of the structures of the grammars, but that they may be accounted for by learning of simple letter frequencies. We (...)
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  14.  30
    Richard Norman (2008). Good Without God. Think 7 (20):35-46.
    In the fifth of our articles on , Richard Norman explains why he believes we can be good without God.
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  15.  1
    Margaret Paton (2014). Dewfall - God's Blessing. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (1):92.
    Paton, Margaret It was the unfamiliar word dewfall that kept my attention and the relation of dewfall to God's Spirit. It will fall on the bread and wine like dew falling. What is it that connects God's Spirit with dew falling that makes it so memorable for me? It is because in the midst of Mass dewfall is a symbol of the powerful outpouring of God's love for Christ crucified and for me, as I praise Him for His goodness. (...)
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  16. Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Judith Norman (eds.) (2004). Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future. Cambridge University Press.
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, Nietzsche embodies (...)
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  17. Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Judith Norman (eds.) (2012). Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future. Cambridge University Press.
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, Nietzsche embodies (...)
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  18. Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Judith Norman (eds.) (2001). Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future. Cambridge University Press.
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, Nietzsche embodies (...)
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  19. Richard Norman (2011). Ethics, Killing and War. Cambridge University Press.
    Can war ever be justified? Why is it wrong to kill? In this new book Richard Norman looks at these and other related questions, and thereby examines the possibility and nature of rational moral argument. Practical examples, such as the Gulf War and the Falklands War, are used to show that, whilst moral philosophy can offer no easy answers, it is a worthwhile enterprise which sheds light on many pressing contemporary problems. A combination of lucid exposition and original argument (...)
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  20. Richard Norman (2012). Ethics, Killing and War. Cambridge University Press.
    Can war ever be justified? Why is it wrong to kill? In this new book Richard Norman looks at these and other related questions, and thereby examines the possibility and nature of rational moral argument. Practical examples, such as the Gulf War and the Falklands War, are used to show that, whilst moral philosophy can offer no easy answers, it is a worthwhile enterprise which sheds light on many pressing contemporary problems. A combination of lucid exposition and original argument (...)
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  21. Richard Norman (2015). On Humanism. Routledge.
    What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century’s crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical defence of humanism. It is also an impassioned plea that we turn to ourselves, not religion, if we want to answer Socrates’ age-old question: what is the best kind of life to lead? (...)
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  22. Richard Norman (2012). On Humanism. Routledge.
    What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century’s crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical defence of humanism. It is also an impassioned plea that we turn to ourselves, not religion, if we want to answer Socrates’ age-old question: what is the best kind of life to lead? (...)
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  23. Richard Norman (2013). On Humanism. Routledge.
    What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century’s crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical defence of humanism. It is also an impassioned plea that we turn to ourselves, not religion, if we want to answer Socrates’ age-old question: what is the best kind of life to lead? (...)
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  24. Michael Paton (2013). Five Classics of Fengshui: Chinese Spiritual Geography in Historical and Environmental Perspective. Brill.
    In Five Classics of Fengshui Michael Paton traces the theoretical development of this form of spiritual geography through full translations of major texts: the Burial Classic of Qing Wu , Book of Burial , Yellow Emperor’s Classic of House Siting , Twenty Four Difficult Problems , and Water Dragon Classic.
     
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  25. Will Kymlicka & Wayne Norman (1994). Return of the Citizen: A Survey of Recent Work on Citizenship Theory. Ethics 104 (2):352-381.
    This article surveys recent work on the idea of "citizenship", not as a legal category, but as a normative ideal of membership and participation. We focus on two emerging issues. First, whereas traditional notions of citizenship assume that membership and participation are promoted by the possession of rights, many theorists now emphasize civic responsibilities. Second, whereas traditional theories assume that citizenship provides a common status and identity, some theorists now argue that the distinctive needs and identities of certain groups -such (...)
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  26. Joseph Heath & Wayne Norman (2004). Stakeholder Theory, Corporate Governance and Public Management: What Can the History of State-Run Enterprises Teach Us in the Post-Enron Era? Journal of Business Ethics 53 (3):247-265.
    This paper raises a challenge for those who assume that corporate social responsibility and good corporate governance naturally go hand-in-hand. The recent spate of corporate scandals in the United States and elsewhere has dramatized, once again, the severity of the agency problems that may arise between managers and shareholders. These scandals remind us that even if we adopt an extremely narrow concept of managerial responsibility – such that we recognize no social responsibility beyond the obligation to maximize shareholder value – (...)
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  27.  21
    Elisabeth Norman, Mark C. Price & Simon C. Duff (2006). Fringe Consciousness in Sequence Learning: The Influence of Individual Differences. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (4):723-760.
    We first describe how the concept of “fringe consciousness” can characterise gradations of consciousness between the extremes of implicit and explicit learning. We then show that the NEO-PI-R personality measure of openness to feelings, chosen to reflect the ability to introspect on fringe feelings, influences both learning and awareness in the serial reaction time task under conditions that have previously been associated with implicit learning . This provides empirical evidence for the proposed phenomenology and functional role of fringe consciousness in (...)
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  28. Elisabeth Norman (2002). Subcategories of "Fringe Consciousness" and Their Related Nonconscious Contexts. Psyche 8 (15).
  29. Jianhui Zhang & Donald A. Norman (1994). Representations in Distributed Cognitive Tasks. Cognitive Science 18 (1):87-122.
  30.  49
    Chris MacDonald, Michael McDonald & Wayne Norman (2002). Charitable Conflicts of Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):67 - 74.
    This paper looks at conflicts of interest in the not-for-profit sector. It examines the nature of conflicts of interest and why they are of ethical concern, and then focuses on the way not-for-profit organisations are especially prone to and vulnerable to conflict-of-interest scandals. Conflicts of interest corrode trust; and stakeholder trust (particularly from donors) is the lifeblood of most charities. We focus on some specific challenges faced by charitable organisations providing funding for scientific (usually medical) research, and examine a case (...)
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  31.  25
    A. C. Greenfield, Carolyn Strand Norman & Benson Wier (2008). The Effect of Ethical Orientation and Professional Commitment on Earnings Management Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):419 - 434.
    The purpose of this study is twofold. The first objective is to examine the impact of an individual's ethical ideology and level of professional commitment on the earnings management decision. The second objective is to observe whether the presence of a personal benefit affects an individual's ethical orientation or professional commitment within the context of an opportunity to manage earnings. Using a sample of 375 undergraduate business majors, our results suggest a significant relationship between an individual's ethical orientation and decision-making. (...)
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  32. H. J. Paton (1929). Self-Identity. Mind 38 (151):312-329.
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  33.  20
    R. P. Loui & Jeff Norman (1995). Rationales and Argument Moves. Artificial Intelligence and Law 3 (3):159-189.
    We discuss five kinds of representations of rationales and provide a formal account of how they can alter disputation. The formal model of disputation is derived from recent work in argument. The five kinds of rationales are compilation rationales, which can be represented without assuming domain-knowledge (such as utilities) beyond that normally required for argument. The principal thesis is that such rationales can be analyzed in a framework of argument not too different from what AI already has. The result is (...)
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  34. H. J. Paton (1956). Kant's First Critique. Philosophical Quarterly 6 (24):260-265.
  35. Richard Norman (2002). Equality, Envy, and the Sense of Injustice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):43–54.
    This paper attempts to defend the value of equality against the accusation that it is an expression of irrational and disreputable feelings of envy of those who are better off. It draws on Rawls’ account of the sense of justice to suggest that resentment of inequalities may be a proper resentment of injustice. The case of resentment of ‘free riders’ is taken as one plausible example of a justified resentment of those who benefit unfairly from a scheme of cooperation. Further (...)
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  36. R. C. Paton, H. S. Nwana, M. J. R. Shave & T. J. M. Bench-Capon (1994). An Examination of Some Metaphorical Contexts for Biologically Motivated Computing. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):505-525.
    Biologically motivated computing seeks to transfer ideas from the biosciences to computer science. In seeking to make transfers it is helpful to be able to appreciate the metaphors which people use. This is because metaphors provide the context through which analogies and similes are made and by which many scientific models are constructed. As such, it is important for any rapidly evolving domain of knowledge to have developments accounted for in these terms. This paper seeks to provide one overview of (...)
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  37. H. B. Acton, Alice Ambrose, T. M. Knox, Mario M. Rossi, H. J. Paton, W. H. Walsh, William Kneale, Peter Landsberg, Maurice Cranston, Homer H. Dubs, R. C. Cross & G. J. Whitrow (1948). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 57 (228):510-543.
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  38.  31
    Chris Reed & Timothy J. Norman (2007). A Formal Characterisation of Hamblin's Action-State Semantics. Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (4):415 - 448.
    Hamblin's Action-State Semantics provides a sound philosophical foundation for understanding the character of the imperative. Taking this as our inspiration, in this paper we present a logic of action, which we call ST, that captures the clear ontological distinction between being responsible for the achievement of a state of affairs and being responsible for the performance of an action. We argue that a relativised modal logic of type RT founded upon a ternary relation over possible worlds integrated with a basic (...)
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  39.  9
    Andrew Norman (1997). Regress and the Doctrine of Epistemic Original Sin. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):477-494.
    Existing solutions to the epistemic regress problem, and the theories of justification built upon them, are inadequate, for they fail to diagnose the root source of the problem. The problem is rooted in our attachment to a pernicious dogma of modern epistemology: the idea that a judgement must be supported by some kind of reason or evidence to be justified. The epistemic analogue of the doctrine of original sin, this idea renders every judgement in need of redemption – guilty until (...)
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  40.  20
    Richard Norman (1994). 'I Did It My Way': Some Thoughts on Autonomy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (1):25–34.
  41.  52
    Andrew P. Norman (1999). Epistemological Contextualism: Its Past, Present, and Prospects. Philosophia 27 (3-4):383-418.
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  42.  76
    H. J. Paton (1937). Kant's so-Called Copernican Revolution. Mind 46 (183):365-371.
  43.  48
    Richard Norman (2001). Criteria of Justice: Desert, Needs and Equality. [REVIEW] Res Publica 7 (2):115-136.
    The conception of social justice as equality is defended in this paper by examining what may appear to be two inegalitarian conceptions of justice, as distribution according to desert and as distribution according to need. It is argued that claims of just entitlement arise within a context of reciprocal co-operation for mutual benefit. Within such a context there are special cases where it can be said that those who contribute more deserve more, and that those who need more should get (...)
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  44.  24
    Ray Paton (1997). Glue, Verb and Text Metaphors in Biology. Acta Biotheoretica 45 (1):1-15.
    Metaphor influences the construction of biological models and theories and the analysis of its use can reveal important tools of thought. Some aspects of biological organisation are investigated through the analysis of metaphors associated with treating biosystems as a kind of text. In particular, the use of glue and verbs is considered. Some of the reasons why glue is important in the construction of hierarchies are pursued in the light of specific examples, and some of the conceptual links between glue (...)
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  45.  16
    Margaret Paton (1990). A Reconsideration of Kant's Treatment of Duties to Oneself. Philosophical Quarterly 40 (159):222-233.
  46.  60
    Jesse Norman (2004). Review: The Iconic Logic of Peirce's Graphs. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (452):783-787.
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  47.  67
    Margaret Paton (1973). Hume on Tragedy. British Journal of Aesthetics 13 (2):121-132.
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  48.  28
    Richard Norman (2001). Practical Reasons and the Redundancy of Motives. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (1):3-22.
    Jonathan Dancy, in his 1994 Aristotelian Society Presidential Address, set out to show ''why there is really no such thing as the theory of motivation''. In this paper I want to agree that there is no such thing, and to offer reasons of a different kind for that conclusion. I shall suggest that the so-called theory of motivation misconstrues the question which it purports to answer, and that when we properly analyse the question and distinguish it clearly from other questions (...)
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  49.  50
    H. J. Paton (1931). The Key to Kant's Deduction of the Categories. Mind 40 (159):310-329.
  50.  56
    Cyril Barrett, Margaret Paton & and Harry Blocker (1967). Symposium: Wittgenstein and Problems of Objectivity in Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (2):158-174.
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