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Norman Y. Teng [4]Norman Yujen Teng [2]
  1. Norman Y. Teng, The Depictive Nature of Visual Mental Imagery.
    Tye argues that visual mental images have their contents encoded in topographically organized regions of the visual cortex, which support depictive representations; therefore, visual mental images rely at least in part on depictive representations. This argument, I contend, does not support its conclusion. I propose that we divide the problem about the depictive nature of mental imagery into two parts: one concerns the format of image representation and the other the conditions by virtue of which a representation becomes a depictive (...)
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  2. Norman Y. Teng (2006). The Relatively Happy Fish Revisited. Asian Philosophy 16 (1):39 – 47.
    The anecdote of Zhuangzi and Hui Shi's brief discussion on a bridge above the Hao river gives us a nice piece of reasoning in ancient Chinese texts that may serve as a platform for a productive philosophical exchange between the East and the West. The present study examines Hansen's inferential analysis of Zhuangzi and Hui Shi's discussion in this spirit. It is argued that Hansen's analysis founders. To do justice to both Hui Shi and Zhuangzi, the present study proposes that (...)
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  3. Norman Y. Teng (2000). A Cognitive Analysis of the Chinese Room Argument. Philosophical Psychology 13 (3):313-24.
    Searle's Chinese room argument is analyzed from a cognitive point of view. The analysis is based on a newly developed model of conceptual integration, the many space model proposed by Fauconnier and Turner. The main point of the analysis is that the central inference constructed in the Chinese room scenario is a result of a dynamic, cognitive activity of conceptual blending, with metaphor defining the basic features of the blending. Two important consequences follow: (1) Searle's recent contention that syntax is (...)
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  4. Norman Y. Teng (1999). The Language of Thought and the Embodied Nature of Language Use. Philosophical Studies 94 (3):237-251.
    This paper attempts to clarify and critically examine Fodor's language of thought (LOT) hypothesis, focusing on his contention that the systematicity of language use provides a solid ground for the LOT hypothesis. (edited).
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  5. Norman Yujen Teng (1999). What is the Background? The Bodily Basis of Mental Representation. Mind and Language: Collected Papers From 1995 International Workshop on Mind and Language 169:169.
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  6. Norman Yujen Teng (1997). Sorensen on Begging the Question. Analysis 57 (3):220–222.
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