Search results for 'Nothing (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  41
    Simon Critchley (2004). Very Little-- Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature. Routledge.
    Very Little ... Almost Nothing puts the question of the meaning of life back at the center of intellectual debate. Its central concern is how we can find a meaning to human finitude without recourse to anything that transcends that finitude. A profound but secular meditation on the theme of death, Critchley traces the idea of nihilism through Blanchot, Levinas, Jena Romanticism and Cavell, culminating in a reading of Beckett, in many ways the hero of the book. For this (...)
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  2.  47
    Stephen Mulhall (2009). Why is There Something Called Philosophy Rather Than Nothing? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):257-.
    My title is intended to invoke at least two primary reference points or associations. The first, and most obvious, is a question that is very often assumed to be exemplary of the kind of bewildering puzzles that philosophers are distinctively preoccupied with – the question ‘why is there something rather than nothing?’ The second is perhaps less easy to identify. A set of lectures delivered by Heidegger in the short period between his restoration to the academic life after the (...)
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  3.  19
    Peter G. Stillman (2000). 'Nothing is, but What is Not': Utopias as Practical Political Philosophy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (2-3):9-24.
    (2000). ‘Nothing is, but what is not’: Utopias as practical political philosophy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 3, The Philosophy of Utopia, pp. 9-24.
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  4. Ray Nicholas (1995). Reviews : W.J. Stankiewicz, In Search of a Political Philosophy: Ideologies at the Close of the Twentieth Century (Routledge, 1993); Alphonso Lingis, The Community of Those Who Have Nothing in Common (Indiana University Press, 1994). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 43 (1):143-146.
    Reviews : W.J. Stankiewicz, In Search of a Political Philosophy: Ideologies at the Close of the Twentieth Century ; Alphonso Lingis, The Community of Those Who Have Nothing in Common.
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  5. Simon Critchley (2004). Very Little... Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy and Literature. Routledge.
    _Very Little... Almost Nothing _puts the question of the meaning of life back at the centre of intellectual debate. Its central concern is how we can find a meaning to human finitude without recourse to anything that transcends that finitude. A profound but secular meditation on the theme of death, Critchley traces the idea of nihilism through Blanchot, Levinas, Jena Romanticism and Cavell, culminating in a reading of Beckett, in many ways the hero of the book. In this second (...)
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  6. Simon Critchley (2002). Very Little...Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature. Routledge.
    The 'death of man', the 'end of history' and even philosophy are strong and troubling currents running through contemporary debates. Yet since Nietzsche's heralding of the 'death of god', philosophy has been unable to explain the question of finitude. _Very Little...Almost Nothing_ goes to the heart of this problem through an exploration of Blanchot's theory of literature, Stanley Cavell's interpretations of romanticism and the importance of death in the work of Samuel Beckett. Simon Critchley links these themes to the philosophy (...)
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  7. Simon Critchley (1997). Very Little...Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature. Routledge.
    The 'death of man', the 'end of history' and even philosophy are strong and troubling currents running through contemporary debates. Yet since Nietzsche's heralding of the 'death of god', philosophy has been unable to explain the question of finitude. _Very Little...Almost Nothing_ goes to the heart of this problem through an exploration of Blanchot's theory of literature, Stanley Cavell's interpretations of romanticism and the importance of death in the work of Samuel Beckett. Simon Critchley links these themes to the philosophy (...)
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  8. Phillip Hoffmann (2003). Nothing so Absurd: An Invitation to Philosophy. Broadview Press.
    Written in clear, non-technical language, Nothing So Absurd is a succinct and accessible introduction to topics in the history of Western philosophy. In seven concise chapters, the author introduces the reader to the central topics within the discipline. In some cases he adopts a historical approach, while in others the focus is as much on contemporary issues as it is on historical developments. In each area, he presents material of great intrinsic interest in a fashion that also provides a (...)
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  9.  96
    Wayne M. Martin (2003). Nothing More or Less Than Logic: General Logic, Transcendental Philosophy, and Kant's Repudiation of Fichte's Wissenschaftslehre. Topoi 22 (1):29-39.
    In this paper I lay the foundations for an understanding of one of Fichte's most neglected and least understood texts: the late lecture course on Transcendental Logic. I situate this work in the context of Fichte's lifelong struggle with the problem of understanding the relation between logic and philosophy – a problem that I show to figure centrally both in Fichte's own revolutionary thinking and in his response to Kant's notorious denunciation of the Wissenschaftslehre. By attending to this context we (...)
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  10. Siroj Sorajjakool (2009). Do Nothing: Inner Peace for Everyday Living: Reflections on Chuang Tzu's Philosophy. Templeton Foundation Press.
    "Words,"writes Chuang Tzu, "are for catching ideas; once you've caught the idea, you can forget the words." In _Do Nothing_, author Siroj Sorajjakool lends us some of his insightful words to help us all "catch" the provocative ideas of one of China's most important literary and philosophical giants—one who emerged at a time when China had several such giants philosophizing on Tao or "the Way." Though his thinking dates back to the fourth century, Chuang Tzu's Tao has profound implications for (...)
     
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  11. William Irwin (2000). Seinfeld and Philosophy a Book About Everything and Nothing.
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  12.  6
    Adam J. Bartlett (2006). By Transmission: How It All Comes Down to Nothing (Gabriel Riera (Ed.), Alain Badiou: Philosophy and its Conditions). Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (2):348-356.
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  13.  1
    Stephen Mulhall (2009). Why is There Something Called Philosophy Rather Than Nothing? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 65:257-273.
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  14.  4
    John S. Vassar (2006). From Socrates to Seinfeld: What's the Deal with Nothing?: William Irwin, Ed. (1999) Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book About Everything and Nothing. Film-Philosophy 10 (3):114-121.
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  15. Andrew Bowie (1998). Very Little… Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 90.
     
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  16. S. Clark Buckner (2004). Nothing, Perhaps? Nihilism, Psychoanalysis, and the Philosophy of History. Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    This dissertation examines Sigmund Freud's psychoanalysis with particular regard to the problem of nihilism, and the philosophy of history that Edmund Husserl and Georg Lukacs argue is needed in its wake to restore reason's capacity to give order and direction to human life. I understand nihilism not merely as the theory that life is devoid of value, but rather as an historical crisis in the sense of autonomy that results from the separation of fact and value in the thoroughly rationalized (...)
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  17.  7
    William Irwin, James B. South & Rod Carveth (eds.) (2010). Mad Men and Philosophy: Nothing is as It Seems. Wiley.
    _A look at the philosophical underpinnings of the hit TV show, _Mad Men__ With its swirling cigarette smoke, martini lunches, skinny ties, and tight pencil skirts, Mad Men is unquestionably one of the most stylish, sexy, and irresistible shows on television. But the series becomes even more absorbing once you dig deeper into its portrayal of the changing social and political mores of 1960s America and explore the philosophical complexities of its key characters and themes. From Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle (...)
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  18. James South & Rod Karveth, Mad Men and Philosophy: Nothing Is as It Seems.
    With its swirling cigarette smoke, martini lunches, skinny ties, and tight pencil skirts, Mad Men is unquestionably one of the most stylish, sexy, and irresistible shows on television. But the series becomes even more absorbing once you dig deeper into its portrayal of the changing social and political mores of 1960s America and explore the philosophical complexities of its key characters and themes. From Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle to John Kenneth Galbraith, Milton Friedman, and Ayn Rand, Mad Men and Philosophy (...)
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  19.  4
    James Bardis (forthcoming). Much Ado About 'Nothing' in Greek Hexameter Philosophy. Apeiron.
    -/- This submission constitutes six (core) pages in literary prose expounding the philosophy of Parmenides of Elea outside the reductionist framework based in formal logic that has become de rigeur in philosophy departments of the English language world — at least prior to Dr. Papa-Grimaldi’s research. To this end, my paper, in chronological order, by way of introduction simulates Plato’s Parmenides; in the main body reconstructs Taran’s argument in “Much Ado About ‘Nothing,’” in Apeiron, Vol. XXXV, No. 2, June (...)
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  20. Pascal Engel (1998). 1. Suppose You Leaf Through the Pages of a Book on Taoism 1, Written by a Renowned Expert, and That You Do Not Know Nothing About the Tao, or Chinese Philosophy, or Even the Chinese Language, and You Read This. [REVIEW] Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):140-151.
     
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  21.  11
    Jerold J. Abrams (2001). William Irwin (Editor). Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book About Everything and Nothing. Modern Schoolman 79 (1):91-94.
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  22.  30
    Simon Glendinning (2001). Much Ado About Nothing (on Herman Philipse, Heidegger's Philosophy of Being). Ratio 14 (3):281–288.
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  23.  24
    Michael McGhee (2011). Is Nothing Sacred? A Secular Philosophy of Incarnation. Philosophical Investigations 34 (2):169-188.
    Christian thinkers have recently expressed concern about the “silencing” or marginalisation of religion in public life, have affirmed the desirability of dialogue between the world of faith and the world of reason but have raised doubts about the feasibility of a moral language that refers to unconditional moral claims or human rights or the intrinsic dignity of human beings if it is not grounded in a transcendent or supernatural source of value. The present paper is an attempt to open a (...)
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  24.  3
    Mario D'Souza (2016). Something Rather Than Nothing: Human Living and the Christian Philosophy of History. Heythrop Journal 57 (3):584-598.
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  25.  4
    Josep-Vicent Ferre Domínguez, Francisco Bueno-Félix C. Fernández, Antonio Claver Ferrer, Jacinto García & Gregorio Martínez (2003). Bermejo, Ignacio Jericó. Domingo Báñez, Teología de la Infidelidad En Paganos y Herejes (1584). Madrid: Editorial Revista Agustiniana, 2000. Chrétien, Jean-Luis. The Unforgettable and the Unhoped For. Trans. J. Bloechl. New York: Fordham University Press, 2002. Cupitt, Don. Is Nothing Sacred: The Non-Realist Philosophy of Religion. New. [REVIEW] Augustinian Studies 34 (1).
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  26.  2
    Robert Burch (1999). Very Little... Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):438-440.
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  27.  1
    Daniel Arnold (1997). Much Ado About Nothing: Thoughts on Neville’s Ontological Questions and Comparative Philosophy. Process Studies 26 (3/4):218-237.
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  28. Charles A. Baylis (1951). Edwards Paul. Do Necessary Propositions “Mean Nothing”? The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 46 , Pp. 457–468. Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (1):77.
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  29.  17
    Don Cupitt (2002). Is Nothing Sacred?: The Non-Realist Philosophy of Religion: Selected Essays. Fordham University Press.
    This book contains essays written over twenty years that appear in book form for the first time.
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  30. John M. Fletcher (1930). The Philosophy of Nothing-But. A Study in Modern Intolerance. Hibbert Journal 29:239.
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  31. Benson Mates (1970). Heath P. L.. Carroll, Lewis. The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Edited by Edwards Paul, The Macmillan Company & The Free Press, New York, and Collier-Macmillan Limited, London, 1967, Vol. 2, Pp. 36–37.Heath P. L.. Nothing. The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Edited by Edwards Paul, The Macmillan Company & The Free Press, New York, and Collier-Macmillan Limited, London, 1967, Vol. 5, Pp. 524–525. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (2):303.
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  32. N. Nakaoka (1985). Question of Difference-Tanabe, Hajime Philosophy of the Absolute Nothing. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 92 (1):124-125.
     
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  33. Leslie M. Pape (1938). "Nothing but" Philosophy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 19 (4):397.
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  34. R. Riha (2005). Action," Whether I Equally Wanted Nothing Else": Kant's Practical Philosophy as a Theory of Subjectivising Action. Filozofski Vestnik 26 (2):37-50.
     
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  35.  25
    F. E. Close (2007). Nothing: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    This short, smart book tells you everything you need to know about " nothing." What remains when you take all the matter away? Can empty space--" nothing "--exist?
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  36. Jayant Burde (2009). Śūnya and Nothingness in Science, Philosophy and Religion. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    pt. 1. Elementary concepts -- pt. 2. Zero in mathematics -- pt. 3. Philosophy and religion -- pt. 4. Science.
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  37. Steven Harrison (1997). Doing Nothing: Coming to the End of the Spiritual Search. Sentient Publications.
    A story about absolute truth -- Something is wrong: emptiness and reality-- The myth of psychology -- The myth of Enlightenment -- Teachers: authority, fascism, and love -- The dark night of the soul -- Doing nothing -- Concentration, meditation, and space -- The nature of thought -- Language and reality -- Religion, symbols, and power -- The crisis of change-- Reaction, projection, and madness -- The collapse of self-- Love, emptiness, and energy -- Communication beyond language -- The (...)
     
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  38. Joan Konner (ed.) (2009). You Don't Have to Be a Buddhist to Know Nothing: An Illustrious Collection of Thoughts on Naught. Prometheus Books.
    Book I: Before -- The origin -- Book II: Genesis -- Here goes nothing -- The light at the end of the tunnel -- Directions -- The geography of nowhere -- Book III: In residence -- Foyer -- Living room -- Dinner party -- East Room -- West Wing -- A room of one's own -- The children's hour -- In the garden -- Reflecting pool -- Book IV: Public library -- Dictionary of nothing -- The reading room (...)
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  39.  20
    John Krummel (2014). Anontology and the Issue of Being and Nothing in Nishida Kitarō. In JeeLoo Liu Douglas L. Berger (ed.), Nothingness in Asian Philosophy. 263-283.
    This chapter will explicate what Nishida means by “nothing” (mu, 無), as well as “being” (yū, 有), through an exposition of his concept of the “place of nothing” (mu no basho). We do so through an investigation of his exposition of “the place of nothing” vis-àvis the self, the world, and God, as it shows up in his epistemology, metaphysics, theology and religious ethics during the various periods of his oeuvre – in other words, his understanding of (...)
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  40. George J. Seidel (1970). Being, Nothing and God. Assen,Van Gorcum.
     
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  41. Nicholas Maxwell (2002). The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (2):381-408.
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the direction of simplicity, (...)
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  42. Anthony J. Cascardi (1995). A Pragmatist Philosophy of Life in Ortega y Gasset. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):374-376.
    Excerpt in lieu of an Abstract: The work of José Ortega y Gasset (1883-1955) is vast, varied, and now largely forgotten. The thinker who was identified by E. R. Curtius as one of "the dozen peers of the European intellect," who was invited to help launch the Aspen Institute in 1949, and who was once nominated for a Nobel prize, has been mainly overlooked by contemporary philosophers and theorists, who have nonetheless followed lines surprisingly close to those sketched out by (...)
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  43.  79
    Jan Faye (2012). The Role of Philosophy in a Naturalized World. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 8 (1):60-76.
    This paper discusses the late Michael Dummett’s characterization of the estrangement between physics and philosophy. It argues against those physicists who hold that modern physics, rather than philosophy, can answer traditional metaphysical questions such as why there is something rather than nothing. The claim is that physics cannot solve metaphysical problems since metaphysical issues are in principle empirically underdetermined. The paper closes with a critical discussion of the assumption of some cosmologists that the Universe was created out of (...): In contrast to this misleading assumption, it is proposed that the Universe has a necessary existence and that the present epoch after the Big Bang is a contingent realization of the Universe. (shrink)
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  44.  78
    Manuel Vargas (2010). On the Value of Philosophy: The Latin American Case. Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):33-52.
    There is very little study of Latin American Philosophy in the English-speaking philosophical world. This can sometimes lead to the impression that there is nothing of philosophical worth in Latin American philosophy or its history. The present article offers some reasons for thinking that this impression is mistaken, and indeed, that we ought to have more study of Latin American philosophy than currently exists in the English-speaking philosophical world. In particular, the article argues for three things: (1) an account (...)
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  45.  13
    Oliver Leaman (1985). An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an introduction to debates in philosophy within the medieval Islamic world. It discusses a number of themes which were controversial within the philosophical community of that period: the creation of the world out of nothing, immortality, resurrection, the nature of ethics, and the relationship between natural and religious law. The author provides an account of the arguments of Farabi, Avicenna, Ghazali, Averroes and Maimonides on these and related topics. His argument takes into account the significance of (...)
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  46.  13
    Matthew Crippen (2007). The Totalitarianism of Therapeutic Philosophy: Reading Wittgenstein Through Critical Theory. Essays in Philosophy 8 (1):3.
    [Excerpted From Editor's Introduction] Matthew Crippen takes this up in a Marcusian critique of Wittgenstein that attends, among other things, to the place of silence in that discourse. Referring to Horkheimer’s citation of the Latin aphorism that silence is consent, Crippen is critical of Wittgenstein’s admonition that we must pass over in silence those matters of which we cannot speak. This raises fascinating questions for critical theory that Crippen explores particularly with reference to Marcuse’s concept of one-dimensionality. To the extent (...)
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  47.  10
    Pablo Lopez Lopez (2008). Philosophy of Languages and Languages as Framework of Philosophies. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:137-141.
    There is a gap between the most abstract approach of Philosophy of language and the empirical information of language sciences. An intermediate level of abstraction and a bridge between Philosophy of language and language sciences is precisely Philosophy of languages. How can we come forward in philosophizing on language, if we are not able to philosophize on particular languages?. Language is nothing but the interrelated sum of languages. Philosophy of languages set out from the fact that every language has (...)
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  48.  6
    Nobuo Kazashi (2008). Passions for Philosophy in The Post-Hiroshima Age. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:57-63.
    Nishida’s analyses of human bodily existence, anticipating Merleau-Ponty’s, led him to accomplish his own “return to the lifeworld.” The later Nishida wrote: “I have now come to regard what I used to call the world of pure experience as the world of historical reality. The world of action-intuition is none other than the world of pure experience.” But Nishida’s attempt at a radical reconstruction of philosophy seems to suffer from a metaphysical optimism deriving from his notion of the “place of (...)
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  49. Bede Rundle (2004). Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing. Oxford University Press.
    The question, 'Why is there something rather than nothing?', has a strong claim to be philosophy's central, and most perplexing, question; it has a capacity to set the head spinning which few other philosophical problems can rival. Bede Rundle challenges the stalemate between theistic and naturalistic explanations with a rigorous, properly philosophical approach, and presents some startlingly novel conclusions.
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  50.  19
    John Wilson (1979). Preface to the Philosophy of Education. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Introduction Philosophy and education 'Philosophy of education' is a name for nothing clear; but despite this there seem already to be two bodies of opinion ...
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