Search results for 'Nursing ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  90
    Ian E. Thompson, Kath M. Melia & Kenneth M. Boyd (eds.) (2006). Nursing Ethics. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier.score: 266.9
    Ethics in nursing: continuity and change -- Cultural issues, methods and approaches to nursing ethics -- Nursing ethics: what do we mean by 'ethics'? -- Becoming a nurse and member of the profession -- Power and responsibility in nursing practice and management -- Professional responsibility and accountability in nursing -- Classical areas of controversy in nursing and biomedical ethics -- Direct responsibility in nurse/patient relationships -- Conflicting demands in (...) groups of patients -- Ethics in healthcare management: research, evaluation and performance management -- The political ethics of healthcare: health policies and resource allocation -- Corporate ethics in healthcare: strategic planning and ethical policy development -- Making moral decisions and being able to justify our actions -- The relevance of moral theory: justifying our ethical policies. (shrink)
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  2. Alan E. Armstrong (2007). Nursing Ethics: A Virtue-Based Approach. Palgrave.score: 265.1
    Reacting against the dominance of obligation-based moral theories in both general and nursing ethics, the author proposes a 'strong' (action-guiding) account of a virtue-based approach to moral decision-making within contemporary nursing practice. Merits and criticisms of obligation and virtue-based approaches to morality are identified and examined. One of the author's central premises is that the notions of moral goodness and badness carry more moral weight than the traditionally important notions of moral rightness and wrongness. Therefore, the author (...)
     
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  3.  13
    Bernadette Dierckx de Casterlé, Mieke Grypdonck, Nancy Cannaerts & Els Steeman (2004). Empirical Ethics in Action: Lessons From Two Empirical Studies in Nursing Ethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (1):31-39.score: 250.9
    Despite the burgeoning of publications in nursing ethics, only more recently has empirical evidence on nursing ethics been published. How nursing ethics can be empirically studied as well as enriched by empirical data will be the focus of this paper. Two empirical studies will be briefly presented and their contribution to ethics discussed. The first one is a quantitative research project about nurses' ethical behavior in daily practice. Using an adapted version of Kohlberg's (...)
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  4. Ann Gallagher (2013). Twentieth Anniversary of Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 20 (2):121-122.score: 220.3
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  5.  7
    Soren Holm (2006). What Should Other Healthcare Professions Learn From Nursing Ethics. Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):165-174.score: 240.3
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  6.  11
    Danielle Blondeau (2002). Nursing Art as a Practical Art: The Necessary Relationship Between Nursing Art and Nursing Ethics. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):252-259.score: 238.8
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  7.  10
    Joan McCarthy (2006). A Pluralist View of Nursing Ethics. Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):157-164.score: 238.7
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  8.  44
    Verena Tschudin (2013). Two Decades of Nursing Ethics Some Thoughts on the Changes. Nursing Ethics 20 (2):123-125.score: 233.7
    This short article reflects the author’s engagement with nursing ethics. The experience of the global market is used to highlight the current practice of working to guidelines and laws rather than professional experience. The need for personal and professional responsibility is stressed as a significant counterbalance to instability in people and societies.
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  9. Martin Benjamin (1992). Ethics in Nursing. Oxford University Press.score: 232.6
    Written by a nurse and a philosopher, Ethics in Nursing blends the concrete detail of recurring problems in nursing practice with the perspectives, methods, and resources of philosophical ethics. It stresses the aspects of the nurses role and relations with others -- physicians, patients, administrators, other nurses -- that give ethical problems in nursing their special focus. Among the issues addressed are deception, parentalism, confidentiality, conscientious refusal, nurse autonomy, compromise, and personal responsibility for institutional and (...)
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  10. Verena Tschudin (2003). Ethics in Nursing: The Caring Relationship. Butterworth-Heinemann.score: 232.3
    This well-known core text on nursing ethics provides an in-depth exploration of nursing ethics content from the western philosophical tradition along with some ...
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  11.  18
    Samantha Mei-che Pang (2003). Nursing Ethics in Modern China: Conflicting Values and Competing Role Requirements. Rodopi.score: 233.2
    One INTRODUCTION: IN SEARCH OF THE VOICES OF NURSES IN CHINA Two motives launched this study to search for the voices of nurses in China. ...
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  12.  4
    Martin Woods (2005). Nursing Ethics Education: Are We Really Delivering the Good (S)? Nursing Ethics 12 (1):5-18.score: 232.1
    The vast majority of research in nursing ethics over the last decade indicates that nurses may not be fully prepared to ‘deliver the good’ for their patients, or to contribute appropriately in the wider current health care climate. When suitable research projects were evaluated for this article, one key question emerged: if nurses are educationally better prepared than ever before to exercise their ethical decision-making skills, why does research still indicate that the expected practice-based improvements remain elusive? Hence, (...)
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  13.  4
    Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (2009). Lived Religion: Implications for Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 16 (4):406-417.score: 231.9
    This article explores how ethics and religion interface in everyday life by drawing on a study examining the negotiation of religious and spiritual plurality in health care. Employing methods of critical ethnography, namely, interviews and participant observation, data were collected from patients, health care providers, administrators and spiritual care providers. The findings revealed the degree to which `lived religion' was intertwined with `lived ethics' for many participants; particularly for people from the Sikh faith. For these participants, religion was (...)
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  14.  2
    Andrew McKie (2004). 'The Demolition of a Man': Lessons From Holocaust Literature for the Teaching of Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 11 (2):138-149.score: 231.9
    The events of the Holocaust of European Jews (and others) by the Nazi state between 1939 and 1945 deserve to be remembered and studied by the nursing profession. By approaching literary texts written by Holocaust ‘survivors’ from an interpersonal dimension, a reading of such works can develop an ‘ethic of responsibility’. By focusing on such themes as rationality, duty, witness and the virtues, potential lessons for nurses working with people in a variety of settings can be drawn. Implications for (...)
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  15.  3
    Ann Gallagher (1995). Medical and Nursing Ethics: Never the Twain? Nursing Ethics 2 (2):95-101.score: 231.3
    Since the publication of Carol Gilligan's In a different voice in 1982, there has been much discussion about masculine and feminine approaches to ethics. It has been suggested that an ethics of care, or a feminine ethics, is more appropriate for nursing practice, which contrasts with the 'traditional, masculine' ethics of medicine. It has been suggested that Nel Noddings' version of an 'ethics of care' (or feminine ethics) is an appropriate model for (...) ethics. The 'four principles' approach has become a popular model for medical or health care ethics. It will be suggested in this article that, whilst Noddings presents an interesting analysis of caring and the caring relationship, this has limitations. Rather than acting as an alternative to the 'four principles' approach, the latter is necessary to provide a framework to structure thinking and decision-making in health care. Further, it will be suggested that ethical separatism (that is, one ethics for nurses and one for doctors) in health care is not a progressive step for nurses or doctors. Three recommendations are made: that we promote a health care ethics that incorporates what is valuable in a 'traditional, masculine ethics', the why (four principles approach) and an 'ethics of care', the 'how' (aspects of Noddings' work and that of Urban Walker); that we encourage nurses and doctors to participate in the 'shared learning' and discussion of ethics; and that our ethical language and concerns are common to all, not split into unhelpful dichotomies. (shrink)
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  16.  1
    Douglas P. Olsen (2003). Ethical Considerations in International Nursing Research: A Report From the International Centre for Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 10 (2):122-137.score: 231.3
    Ethical issues in international nursing research are identified and the perspectives of the International Centre for Nursing Ethics are offered in an effort to develop an international consensus of ethical behaviour in research. First, theoretical issues are reviewed, then initial conditions for ethical conduct are defined, and protocol design and procedure considerations are examined. A concerted effort is made to identify and avoid a western bias. Broad guiding principles for designing and reviewing research are offered: respect for (...)
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  17.  9
    Verena Tschudin (2006). How Nursing Ethics as a Subject Changes: An Analysis of the First 11 Years of Publication of the Journal Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 13 (1):65-85.score: 231.2
    By analysing the first, second, 10th and 11th years of publication (i.e. volumes 1, 2, 10, 11) of Nursing Ethics, I will show the significant visible trends in the articles and draw some conclusions. The trends are visible at various levels: from simple analysis of an issue, or a comment on a situation in the early years, to in-depth philosophical and research studies; and from short statements to much longer articles. The ethical approaches used go from either none (...)
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  18.  8
    S. Izumi, H. Nagae, C. Sakurai & E. Imamura (2012). Defining End-of-Life Care From Perspectives of Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 19 (5):608-618.score: 231.2
    Despite increasing interests and urgent needs for quality end-of-life care, there is no exact definition of what is the interval referred to as end of life or what end-of-life care is. The purpose of this article is to report our examination of terms related to end-of-life care and define end-of-life care from nursing ethics perspectives. Current terms related to end-of-life care, such as terminal care, hospice care, and palliative care, are based on a medical model and are restrictive (...)
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  19.  8
    Mariël Kanne (1994). Professional Nurses Should Have Their Own Ethics: The Current Status of Nursing Ethics in the Dutch Curriculum. Nursing Ethics 1 (1):25-33.score: 231.2
    Should nurses have their own ethics to match specific problems met in their daily routines? How do nurses act in a society that is changing from a 'monocultural' to an 'intercultural' structure? What are the ethical consequences of these changes for their many tasks? How can the ethical aspects be taught to nurses? This article describes the current status of nursing ethics in the curriculum taught in schools of higher education for nurses in The Netherlands. Aspects of (...)
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  20.  10
    Anne Simmonds (2013). Nursing Ethics in Everyday Practice. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):407-409.score: 231.2
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  21.  3
    Bart Cusveller (2013). A Calvinist Account of Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 20 (7):0969733012473010.score: 231.2
    A relatively small but intellectually robust strand in the Christian religion is the Reformed tradition. Especially, its Calvinist sensibilities inform this Protestant stance towards human culture in general and vocations in particular. Correspondingly, there are some small but robust contributions to academic discourse in nursing ethics. So far there has been no attempt to bring those together as a distinct approach. This article suggests such a Reformed Christian, especially Calvinist, account of nursing ethics. Central to the (...)
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  22.  3
    K. Lu¨Tze´N. (1997). Nursing Ethics Into the Next Millennium: A Context-Sensitive Approach for Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 4 (3):219-226.score: 231.1
    The aim of this article is to argue for the need for a context-sensitive approach to the understanding of ethical issues in nursing practice as we face the next millennium. This approach means that the idea of universalism must be questioned because ethics is an interpersonal activity, set in a specific context. This view is based on issues that arise in international collaborative research as well as in research focused on ethical problems in nursing practice. Moral values (...)
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  23.  1
    Jolanta Toliušienė & Eimantas Peičius (2007). Changes in Nursing Ethics Education in Lithuania. Nursing Ethics 14 (6):753-757.score: 231.1
    The post-Soviet scene in Lithuania is one of rapid change in medical and nursing ethics. A short introduction to the current background sets the scene for a wider discussion of ethics in health care professionals' education. Lithuania had to adapt rapidly from a politicized nursing and ethics curriculum to European regulations, and from a paternalistic style of care to one of engagement with choices and dilemmas. The relationships between professionals, and between professionals and patients, are (...)
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  24.  3
    Chiou-Fen Lin, Meei-Shiow Lu, Chun-Chih Chung & Che-Ming Yang (2010). A Comparison of Problem-Based Learning and Conventional Teaching in Nursing Ethics Education. Nursing Ethics 17 (3):373-382.score: 231.1
    The aim of this study was to compare the learning effectiveness of peer tutored problem-based learning and conventional teaching of nursing ethics in Taiwan. The study adopted an experimental design. The peer tutored problem-based learning method was applied to an experimental group and the conventional teaching method to a control group. The study sample consisted of 142 senior nursing students who were randomly assigned to the two groups. All the students were tested for their nursing ethical (...)
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  25.  2
    Trevor Hussey (1996). Nursing Ethics and Codes of Professional Conduct. Nursing Ethics 3 (3):250-258.score: 231.1
    Nurses, like many other professional and semiprofessional groups, have a code of con duct. This raises important philosophical questions about the point of including nursing ethics in nursing education and about the content and methods of such teaching. This paper identifies seven functions that might be fulfilled by professional codes; it discusses the philosophical issues these raise and the implications for teaching professional ethics. It is argued that, far from codes rendering the teaching of ethics (...)
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  26.  7
    S. Holland (1999). Teaching Nursing Ethics by Cases: A Personal Perspective. Nursing Ethics 6 (5):434-436.score: 231.1
    This article is a reflection on the use of case study material in the teaching of ethics to nursing students. Given the main aims of a course in ethics for nurses and the limited effectiveness of formal moral theory, it seems inevitable that the mainstay of nursing ethics courses will continue to be case study material. This approach has recently been criticized on a number of grounds. The author suggests here that disquiet over teaching (...) in this way should motivate a concern not with whether, but how, teaching by cases is to be undertaken. (shrink)
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  27.  1
    Sashka Popova (1996). Nursing Ethics: What Lies Ahead? The Case of Bulgaria. Nursing Ethics 3 (1):69-72.score: 231.0
    In Bulgaria, we are sharing a transition to a civic society and a market economy, which means transferring to new parameters of our culture. Many old customs based on coer cion, obedience and unacceptable interference are gradually dying out, and new princi ples tend to shape the way we live our collective lives. These include the ethics of partnership, which tend to create an assertion of individual rights and an affirmation of free will and autonomy, and within which the (...)
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  28.  1
    Chair Douglas P. Olsen (2003). Ethical Considerations in International Nursing Research: A Report From the International Centre for Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 10 (2):122-137.score: 231.0
    Ethical issues in international nursing research are identified and the perspectives of the International Centre for Nursing Ethics are offered in an effort to develop an international consensus of ethical behaviour in research. First, theoretical issues are reviewed, then initial conditions for ethical conduct are defined, and protocol design and procedure considerations are examined. A concerted effort is made to identify and avoid a western bias. Broad guiding principles for designing and reviewing research are offered: (1) respect (...)
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  29. Ursula Gallagher & Kenneth M. Boyd (1991). Teaching and Learning Nursing Ethics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).score: 231.0
     
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  30.  7
    P. Nortvedt (1998). Sensitive Judgement: An Inquiry Into the Foundations of Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 5 (5):385-392.score: 226.8
    This article considers the foundation of nursing as a moral practice. Its basic claim is that all nursing knowledge and action reside on a moral foundation. The clinical gaze meets vulnerability in the patient’s human condition. To see a patient’s wound is to see his or her hurt and discomfort; it is a concerned observation. To see the factual and pathophysiological is at the same time to see the ethical: the moral realities of suffering, pain and discomfort. A (...)
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  31.  92
    Stephen Holland (2010). Scepticism About the Virtue Ethics Approach to Nursing Ethics. Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):151-158.score: 222.8
    Nursing ethics centres on how nurses ought to respond to the moral situations that arise in their professional contexts. Nursing ethicists invoke normative approaches from moral philosophy. Specifically, it is increasingly common for nursing ethicists to apply virtue ethics to moral problems encountered by nurses. The point of this article is to argue for scepticism about this approach. First, the research question is motivated by showing that requirements on nurses such as to be kind, do (...)
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  32.  3
    David Wright & Susan Brajtman (2011). Relational and Embodied Knowing: Nursing Ethics Within the Interprofessional Team. Nursing Ethics 18 (1):20-30.score: 226.9
    In this article we attempt to situate nursing within the interprofessional care team with respect to processes of ethical practice and ethical decision making. After briefly reviewing the concept of interprofessionalism, the idea of a nursing ethic as ‘unique’ within the context of an interprofessional team will be explored. We suggest that nursing’s distinct perspective on the moral matters of health care stem not from any privileged vantage point but rather from knowledge developed through the daily activities (...)
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  33.  7
    Nancy J. Crigger (2008). Towards a Viable and Just Global Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 15 (1):17-27.score: 224.7
    Globalization, an outgrowth of technology, while informing us about people throughout the world, also raises our awareness of the extreme economic and social disparities that exist among nations. As part of a global discipline, nurses are vitally interested in reducing and eliminating disparities so that better health is achieved for all people. Recent literature in nursing encourages our discipline to engage more actively with social justice issues. Justice in health care is a major commitment of nursing; thus questions (...)
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  34.  2
    Elizabeth Johnston Taylor & Mark F. Carr (2009). Nursing Ethics in the Seventh-Day Adventist Religious Tradition. Nursing Ethics 16 (6):707-718.score: 224.5
    Nurses’ religious beliefs influence their motivations and perspectives, including their practice of ethics in nursing care. When the impact of these beliefs is not recognized, great potential for unethical nursing care exists. Thus, this article examines how the theology of one religious tradition, Seventh-day Adventism (SDA), could affect nurses. An overview of SDA history and beliefs is presented, which explains why ‘medical missionary’ work is central to SDAs. Theological foundations that would permeate an SDA nurse’s view of (...)
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  35.  2
    Joseph D. Cortis & Kevin Kendrick (2003). Nursing Ethics, Caring and Culture. Nursing Ethics 10 (1):77-88.score: 224.5
    Recent years have witnessed the publication of numerous articles that draw a critical alignment between ethics and caring. In essence, this theme suggests that caring is a moral pursuit centred on the beneficent attention of one person shown to another. Yet, if such language is to have real poignancy, it must be geared towards an inclusive agenda that meets the needs of all within the community. Research evidence suggests that this is not always the case, especially in terms of (...)
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  36.  1
    Tineke A. Abma, Guy Am Widdershoven, Brenda Jm Frederiks, Rob H. Van Hooren, Frans van Wijmen & Paul Lmg Curfs (2008). Dialogical Nursing Ethics: The Quality of Freedom Restrictions. Nursing Ethics 15 (6):789-802.score: 224.5
    This article deals with the question of how ethicists respond to practical moral problems emerging in health care practices. Do they remain distanced, taking on the role of an expert, or do they become engaged with nurses and other participants in practice and jointly develop contextualized insights about good care? A basic assumption of dialogical ethics entails that the definition of good care and what it means to be a good nurse is a collaborative product of ongoing dialogues among (...)
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  37.  4
    D. G. Schneider & F. R. S. Ramos (2012). Moral Deliberation and Nursing Ethics Cases: Elements of a Methodological Proposal. Nursing Ethics 19 (6):764-776.score: 224.5
    A qualitative study with an exploratory, descriptive and documentary design that was conducted with the objective of identifying the elements to constitute a method for the analysis of accusations of and proceedings for professional ethics infringements. The method is based on underlying elements identified inductively during analysis of professional ethics hearings judged by and filed in the archives of the Regional Nursing Board of Santa Catarina, Brazil, between 1999 and 2007. The strategies developed were based on the (...)
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  38.  2
    V. Tschudin (1998). Myths, Magic and Reality in Nursing Ethics: A Personal Perspective. Nursing Ethics 5 (1):52-58.score: 224.4
    Ethics, especially in nursing, tends to be surrounded by myths and ideas that have more in common with magic than reality. This article argues from quotes of two medieval men, Thomas Aquinas and Meister Eckhart, that ethical behaviour among nurses is not something difficult or far-fetched, but something immediate, everyday, and often very simple. The more weighty ethical dilemmas are not diminished by this. Aspects of justice, compassion and courage are discussed from the point of view of relationships (...)
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  39. Sara T. Fry (2008). Ethics in Nursing Practice: A Guide to Ethical Decision Making. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 224.4
    Every day nurses are required to make ethical decisions in the course of caring for their patients. Ethics in Nursing Practice provides the background necessary to understand ethical decision making and its implications for patient care. The authors focus on the individual nurse’s responsibilities, as well as considering the wider issues affecting patients, colleagues and society as a whole. This third edition is fully updated, and takes into account recent changes in ICN position statements, WHO documents, as well (...)
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  40.  1
    Suzana dos Santos Gomes, Andrea Vaz dos Santos, Luciana Borges de Lima, Salomão Oliveira & Roberta Moura (2010). A ética do cuidado no exercício da enfermagem: um olhar sobre os pacientes oncológicos (The ethics of care in the practice of nursing: a look at the oncology patients) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n18p145. [REVIEW] Horizonte 8 (18):145-169.score: 218.0
    O objetivo deste artigo é analisar a ética do cuidado de enfermagem no tratamento de pacientes oncológicos. Optou-se pela pesquisa bibliográfica de abordagem qualitativa cuja metodologia foi dividida em etapas. Na primeira etapa, foi realizado um levantamento de artigos publicados, no período de 2000 a 2009, em periódicos do Scielo, utilizando os descritores: saúde/doença, enfermagem, ética do cuidado e oncologia. Esse levantamento culminou com a seleção de 28 artigos, 21 dos quais foram eleitos posteriormente para leitura aprofundada, assim como para (...)
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  41.  4
    Stephen Michael Holland (2012). Furthering the Sceptical Case Against Virtue Ethics in Nursing Ethics. Nursing Philosophy 13 (4):266-275.score: 217.9
    In a recent article in this journal I presented a sceptical argument about the current prominence of virtue ethics in nursing ethics. Daniel Putman has responded with a defence of the relevance of virtue in nursing. The present article continues this discussion by clarifying, defending, and expanding the sceptical argument. I start by emphasizing some features of the sceptical case, including assumptions about the nature of sceptical arguments, and about the character of both virtue ethics (...)
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  42.  6
    Taleb Durgahee (1997). Reflective Practice: Nursing Ethics Through Story Telling. Nursing Ethics 4 (2):135-146.score: 211.4
    Reflection is a method of learning and teaching professional maturity through the critical analysis of experience. An illuminative research approach was used over a period of five years in collaboration with students on a palliative care course to investigate the effects of learning moral and ethical reasoning by reliving clinical experiences through story telling. This study concludes that: self-concept is enhanced; communication skills are increased; and insight development is part of learning to reason fairly and ethically, and is achieved through (...)
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  43.  8
    L. Schultz (1997). Not for Resuscitation: Two Decades of Challenge for Nursing Ethics and Practice. Nursing Ethics 4 (3):227-238.score: 211.3
    Since the 1970s, the designation of some patients as ‘not for resuscitation’ (NFR) has become standard practice in many health care facilities. Considerable disquiet has subsequently arisen about the way these decisions are implemented in practice. Nurses, in particular, often find themselves initiating or withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in situations characterized by verbal orders, euphemistic documentation and poor communication, and when consultations with patients about their CPR choices often do not take place. These practices have developed in large part because (...)
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  44.  1
    Emiko Konishi, Michiko Yahiro, Naoko Nakajima & Miki Ono (2009). The Japanese Value of Harmony and Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 16 (5):625-636.score: 211.3
    Harmony is one of the most fundamental Japanese values. It is derived from Confucianism and encompasses a state of mind, an action process and outcomes of the action. This article draws on research data and discusses Japanese nurses’ perceptions of harmony as reflected in their everyday practice. The most important virtues for these nurses were reported as politeness and respect for other persons. The outcome from the nurses’ harmonious practice, it is claimed, benefited patients and created peaceful, harmonious relationships for (...)
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  45.  0
    A. Lipp (1998). An Enquiry Into a Combined Approach for Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 5 (2):122-138.score: 211.2
    A definitive theory for ethical decision making in nursing is still only conjecture. The literature confirms that there have been numerous examinations of ethical decision making in nursing, with most proposing either the justice or the care orientation, or a combination of both. In the absence of a definitive theory, this exploratory work sets out, via grounded theory, to shed some light on the methods used every day by nurses to make ethical decisions in the clinical area. The (...)
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  46.  0
    Maj-Britt Råholm & Lisbet Lindholm (1999). Being in the World of the Suffering Patient: A Challenge to Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 6 (6):528-539.score: 211.2
    Ethics in caring is what we actually make explicit through our approach and how we invite the suffering patient into a caring relationship. This phenomenological study investigates suffering and health and how this presupposes a deeper reflection on ethics in caring. The aim was to try to discover, describe and understand how patients experience their life situation three years after undergoing surgery. The theoretical approach is based on central aspects of Eriksson’s caritative theory (i.e. the view of the (...)
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  47.  10
    Francine Wynn (2002). Nursing and the Concept of Life: Towards an Ethics of Testimony. Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):120-132.score: 206.5
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  48.  24
    Martin Benjamin (2010). Ethics in Nursing: Cases, Principles, and Reasoning. Oxford University Press.score: 206.8
    Moral dilemmas and ethical inquiry -- Unavoidable topics in ethical theory -- Nurses and clients -- Recurring ethical issues in interprofessional relationships -- Ethical dilemmas among nurses -- Personal responsibility for institutional and public policy -- Cost containment, justice, and rationing.
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  49.  2
    Anne Clancy & Tommy Svensson (2007). ?Faced? With Responsibility: Levinasian Ethics and the Challenges of Responsibility in Norwegian Public Health Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 8 (3):158-166.score: 205.6
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  50. Verena Tschudin (2006). Report Cultural and Historical Perspectives on Nursing and Ethics: Listening to Each Other-Report of the Conference in Taipei, Taiwan, 19 May 2005, Organized by ICNE and Nursing Ethics. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 13 (3):304-322.score: 202.0
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