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  1. O. C. Ferrell (2013). Business Ethics: Ethical Decision Making and Cases. Houghton Mifflin Co.
    Providing a vibrant four-color design, market-leading BUSINESS ETHICS: ETHICAL DECISION MAKING AND CASES, Ninth Edition, thoroughly covers the complex environment in which managers confront ethical decision making. Using a proven managerial framework, this accessible, applied text addresses the overall concepts, processes, and best practices associated with successful business ethics programs--helping readers see how ethics can be integrated into key strategic business decisions. Thoroughly revised, the new ninth edition incorporates coverage of new legislation affecting business ethics, the most up-to-date examples, and (...)
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  2. Tracy L. Gonzalez-Padron, O. C. Ferrell, Linda Ferrell & Ian A. Smith (2012). A Critique of Giving Voice to Values Approach to Business Ethics Education. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (4):251-269.
    Mary Gentile’s Giving Voice to Values presents an approach to ethics training based on the idea that most people would like to provide input in times of ethical conflict using their own values. She maintains that people recognize the lapses in organizational ethical judgment and behavior, but they do not have the courage to step up and voice their values to prevent the misconduct. Gentile has developed a successful initiative and following based on encouraging students and employees to learn how (...)
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  3. Ken Lay, O. C. Ferrell & Linda Ferrell (2011). The Responsibility and Accountability of CEOs: The Last Interview with Ken Lay. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (2):209 - 219.
    Responsibility and accountability of CEOs has been a major ethical concern over the past 10 years. Major ethical dilemmas at Enron, Worldcom, AIG, as well as other well-known organizations have been at least partially blamed on CEO malfeasance. Interviews with Ken Lay, CEO of Enron, after his 2006 fraud convictions provides an opportunity to document his perceived role in the demise of Enron. Possibly no other CEO has had as much impact on the scrutiny and legalization of business ethics as (...)
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  4. O. C. Ferrell & Linda Ferrell (2005). Understanding How to Teach Business Ethics by Understanding Business Ethics. In Sheb L. True, Linda Ferrell & O. C. Ferrell (eds.), Fulfilling Our Obligation: Perspectives on Teaching Business Ethics. Kennesaw State University.
     
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  5. Sheb L. True, Linda Ferrell & O. C. Ferrell (eds.) (2005). Fulfilling Our Obligation: Perspectives on Teaching Business Ethics. Kennesaw State University.
     
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  6. John M. Clark, Linda Ferrell & O. C. Ferrell (2003). Conflicts of Interest Arising From the Prudent Investor Rule: Ethical Implications for Over-the-Counter Derivative Securities. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 47 (2):165 - 173.
    The Prudent Investor Rule creates a potential ethical dilemma for investment advisors selling over-the-counter financial products issued by their firms. The "opportunity" to defraud investors using complex, over-the-counter derivative securities designed for client-specific risk management is much higher than for exchange traded securities. This paper emphasizes the ethical responsibility held by trustees and their organizations to eliminate potential conflict of interests through internal control and monitoring. Independent evaluations of the performance of investment advisors and independent appraisals of complex over-the-counter securities (...)
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  7. Maignan Isabelle & O. C. Ferrell (2000). Measuring Corporate Citizenship in Two Countries: The Case of the United Staes and France. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (3).
     
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  8. Isabelle Maignan & O. C. Ferrell (2000). Measuring Corporate Citizenship in Two Countries: The Case of the United States and France. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 23 (3):283 - 297.
    Based on an extensive review of the literature and field surveys, the paper proposes a conceptualization and operationalization of corporate citizenship meaningful in two countries: the United States and France. A survey of 210 American and 120 French managers provides support for the proposed definition of corporate citizenship as a construct including the four correlated factors of economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary citizenship. The managerial implications of the research and directions for future research are discussed.
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  9. O. C. Ferrell (1999). An Assessment of the Proposed Academy of Marketing Science Code of Ethics for Marketing Educators. Journal of Business Ethics 19 (2):225 - 228.
    The development of a professional code of ethics should provide an explanation of the professional values and principals that guide a body of persons engaged in an important role in society. Most professions find ethical standards of conduct are necessary to codify acceptable behavior to develop public trust, reliability, and consistency in their performance. The proposed AMS Code of Ethics for Marketing Educators is the first step in developing communication, debate, and hopefully, agreement about the social responsibility of the marekting (...)
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  10. O. C. Ferrell, Michael D. Hartline & Stephen W. McDaniel (1998). Codes of Ethics Among Corporate Research Departments, Marketing Research Firms, and Data Subcontractors: An Examination of a Three-Communities Metaphor. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (5):49-62.
    Despite the importance of the interorganizational nature of the marketing research process, very little research has addressed how research organizations differ and how they affect each other in the conduct of ethical marketing research. The purpose of this study is to examine differences among three typical participants in the research process: corporate research departments, marketing research firms, and data subcontractors. These organizations were examined with respect to having and enforcing internal codes of conduct and the awareness and enforcement of external (...)
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  11. O. C. Ferrell, Debbie Thorne LeClair & Linda Ferrell (1998). The Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations: A Framework for Ethical Compliance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (4):353-363.
    After years of debate over the importance of ethical conduct in organizations, the federal government has decided to institutionalize ethics as a buffer to prevent legal violations in organizations. The key requirements of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines (FSG) are outlined, and suggested actions managers should adopt to improve ethical compliance are presented. An effective compliance program is more a process and commitment than a specific blueprint for conduct. The organization has the responsibility to create an organizational climate to reduce misconduct. (...)
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  12. David Strutton, Lou E. Pelton & O. C. Ferrell (1997). Ethical Behavior in Retail Settings: Is There a Generation Gap? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):87-105.
    A new generation, earmarked the Thirteeners, is an emerging force in the marketplace. The Thirteener cohort group, so designated since they are the thirteenth generation to know the American flag and constitution, encompass over 62 million adult consumers. All the former "Mall Rats" have grown up. The normative structures that these Thirteeners employ in both acquisition and disposition retail settings is empirically assessed in this study through the use of a national sample. The findings suggest that Thirteeners are more likely (...)
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  13. John Fraedrich, Debbie M. Thorne & O. C. Ferrell (1994). Assessing the Application of Cognitive Moral Development Theory to Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (10):829 - 838.
    Cognitive moral development (CMD) theory has been accepted as a construct to help explain business ethics, social responsibility and other organizational phenomena. This article critically assesses CMD as a construct in business ethics by presenting the history and criticisms of CMD. The value of CMD is evaluated and problems with using CMD as one predictor of ethical decisions are addressed. Researchers are made aware of the major criticisms of CMD theory including disguised value judgments, invariance of stages, and gender bias (...)
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  14. S. W. Kelley, O. C. Ferrell & S. J. Skinner (1990). Ethical Behavior Among Marketing Researchers: An Assessment of Selected Demographic Characteristics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (8):681 - 688.
    This study considers the relationship between perceptions of ethical behavior and the demographic characteristics of sex, age, education level, job title, and job tenure among a sample of marketing researchers. The findings of this study indicate that female marketing researchers, older marketing researchers, and marketing researchers holding their present job for ten years or more generally rate their behavior as more ethical.
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  15. John Fraedrich, O. C. Ferrell & William Pride (1989). An Empirical Examination of Three Machiavellian Concepts: Advertisers Vs. The General Public. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (9):687 - 694.
    This paper examines the perceived ethics of advertisers and the general public relative to three ethical concepts. Based on the survey findings, it can be concluded that with regard to the ethically-laden concepts of manipulation, exploitation, and deviousness, advertisers are perceptually as ethical as the general public. The research also clarifies some of the differences between ethics and Machiavellianism.
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  16. O. C. Ferrell (1986). Commentary on a Moral Evaluation of Sales Practices. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 5 (1):22-27.
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