Search results for 'Obedience' (try it on Scholar)

355 found
Sort by:
  1. I. Obedience (2005). Enjoying the Law. SATS 6 (2).score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Thomas M. Hughes (2012). Is Political Obligation Necessary for Obedience? Hobbes on Hostility, War and Obligation. Teoria Politica 2:77-99.score: 18.0
    Contemporary debates on obedience and consent, such as those between Thomas Senor and A. John Simmons, suggest that either political obligation must exist as a concept or there must be natural duty of justice accessible to us through reason. Without one or the other, de facto political institutions would lack the requisite moral framework to engage in legitimate coercion. This essay suggests that both are unnecessary in order to provide a conceptual framework in which obedience to coercive political (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Miguel Pina E. Cunha, Arménio Rego & Stewart R. Clegg (2010). Obedience and Evil: From Milgram and Kampuchea to Normal Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):291-309.score: 18.0
    Obedience: a simple term. Stanley Milgram, the famous experimental social psychologist, shocked the world with theory about it. Another man, Pol Pot, the infamous leader of the Khmer Rouge, showed how far the desire for obedience could go in human societies. Milgram conducted his experiments in the controlled environment of the US psychology laboratory of the 1960s. Pol Pot experimented with Utopia in the totalitarian Kampuchea of the 1970s. In this article, we discuss the process through which the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jerry Paul Sheppard & Marnie Young (2007). The Routes of Moral Development and the Impact of Exposure to the Milgram Obedience Study. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (4):315 - 333.score: 18.0
    This article examines how business students route themselves through the process of cognitive moral development (CMD) to arrive at a more autonomous level of CMD when there is an impetus to do so. In this study, two groups were given Rest’s Defining Issues Test; half the test 1 week and half three weeks later. In between, one group viewed a film of Milgram’s obedience study as a stimulus towards a more autonomous level of CMD. The results of the analysis (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David Berman (1986). The Jacobitism of Berkeley's Passive Obedience. Journal of the History of Ideas 47 (2):309-319.score: 18.0
    Why did the Lord Justices make strong representation against Berkeley? According to Joseph Stock, Berkeley's first biographer "Lord Galway [a Lord Justice in 1716] having heard of those sermons, published in 1712 as Passive Obedience represented Berkeley as a Jacobite, and hence unworthy of the living of St. Paul's. From the beginning, Passive Obedience was rumored to be politically heterodox...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Nico Keijzer (1978). Military Obedience. Sijthoff & Noordhoff, [International Publishers].score: 15.0
    PART I PROLEGOMENA ACTING ON ORDERS "First, words are our tools, and, as a minimum, we should use clean tools: we should know what we mean and what we do ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David O. Irabor & Peter Omonzejele (2009). Local Attitudes, Moral Obligation, Customary Obedience and Other Cultural Practices: Their Influence on the Process of Gaining Informed Consent for Surgery in a Tertiary Institution in a Developing Country. Developing World Bioethics 9 (1):34-42.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Peter R. Baelz (1973). Christian Obedience in a Permissive Context. London,Athlone Press.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ruth C. A. Higgins (2004). The Moral Limits of Law: Obedience, Respect, and Legitimacy. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    The Moral Limits of Law analyzes the related debates concerning the moral obligation to obey the law, conscientious citizenship, and state legitimacy. Modern societies are drawn in a tension between the centripetal pull of the local and the centrifugal stress of the global. Boundaries that once appeared permanent are now permeable: transnational legal, economic, and trade institutions increasingly erode the autonomy of states. Nonetheless transnational principles are still typically effected through state law. For law's subjects, this tension brings into focus (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Dorothee Sölle (1970). Beyond Mere Obedience. Minneapolis,Augsburg Pub. House.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. William A. Edmundson (2010). Political Authority, Moral Powers and the Intrinsic Value of Obedience. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (1):179-191.score: 12.0
    Three concepts—authority, obedience and obligation—are central to understanding law and political institutions. The three are also involved in the legitimation of the state: an apology for the state has to make a normative case for the state’s authority, for its right to command obedience, and for the citizen’s obligation to obey the state’s commands. Recent discussions manifest a cumulative scepticism about the apologist’s task. Getting clear about the three concepts is, of..
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ernest J. Weinrib (1982). Obedience to the Law in Plato's Crito. American Journal of Jurisprudence 27 (1):85-108.score: 12.0
    Plato's Crito is not a treatise on obedience to the law, but a dialogue whose interpretation is not determined by its surface meaning. The initial dream is not mere ornamentation; rather it points to the range of possibilities in Socrates' situation. The speeches of the Laws, with which the dialogue closes, are not intended to be philosophically cogent, since they are inconsistent with the principles laid out in the preceding conversation between Socrates and Crito. The arguments of the Laws (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. James D. Rissler (2002). A Psychological Constraint on Obedience to God's Commands: The Reasonableness of Obeying the Abhorrently Evil. Religious Studies 38 (2):125-146.score: 12.0
    Robert Adams, in Finite and Infinite Goods: A Framework for Ethics, suggests a moral constraint on our obedience to God's commands: if a purportedly divine command seems abhorrently evil, then we should infer that it is not really God so commanding. I suggest that in light of his commitments to God as the standard of goodness, to the transcendence of God, and to a critical stance towards ethics, Adams should be willing to consider the possibility of a good God (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Christian Dahlman (2009). The Difference Between Obedience Assumed and Obedience Accepted. Ratio Juris 22 (2):187-196.score: 12.0
    Abstract. The analysis of legal statements that are made from an "internal point of view" must distinguish statements where legal obedience is accepted from statements where legal obedience is only assumed. Statements that are based on accepted obedience supply reasons for action, but statements where obedience is merely assumed can never provide reasons for action. It is argued in this paper that John Searle neglects this distinction. Searle claims that a statement from the internal point of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Kenneth R. Westphal (1992). Kant on the State, Law, and Obedience to Authority in the Alleged 'Anti-Revolutionary' Writings. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:383-426.score: 12.0
    The tension between Kant’s egalitarian conception of persons as ends in themselves and his rejection of the right of revolution has been widely discussed. The crucial issue is more fundamental: Is Kant’s defense of absolute obedience consistent with his own principle of legitimate law, that legitimate law is compatible with the Categorical Imperative? Resolving this apparent inconsistency resolves the subsidiary inconsistencies that have been debated in the literature. I argue that Kant’s legal principles contain two distinct grounds of obligation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Alexander Pruss, Love and Obedience.score: 12.0
    As Mark Murphy has recently shown, standard justifications of universal divine authority are insufficient. [1] By “divine authority” I shall mean the doctrine that obedience is morally owed to God by all. God would not give us a command that we did not have a reason to act in accordance with, Murphy argues, but it does not follow that we would be obliged, much less morally obliged, to have the fact of God’s having commanded the action be among our (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. D. T. Ridley (1999). Jehovah's Witnesses' Refusal of Blood: Obedience to Scripture and Religious Conscience. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):469-472.score: 12.0
    Jehovah's Witnesses are students of the Bible. They refuse transfusions out of obedience to the scriptural directive to abstain and keep from blood. Dr Muramoto disagrees with the Witnesses' religious beliefs in this regard. Despite this basic disagreement over the meaning of Biblical texts, Muramoto flouts the religious basis for the Witnesses' position. His proposed policy change about accepting transfusions in private not only conflicts with the Witnesses' fundamental beliefs but it promotes hypocrisy. In addition, Muramoto's arguments about pressure (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Luciano Venezia (2014). Hobbes' Two Accounts of Law and the Structure of Reasons for Political Obedience. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (3):282-298.score: 12.0
    Thomas Hobbes’s political theory contains conceptual theses on law, including an analysis of the way legal requirements affect practical reasoning. However, Hobbes’ account of law and the structure of reasons for political obedience is extremely ambiguous. In this paper, I show that Hobbes develops not one but two different accounts. Also, I argue that the two theories are in tension, something that Hobbes himself seems to recognize to some extent.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Robin S. Snell (1999). Obedience to Authority and Ethical Dilemmas in Hong Kong Companies. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (3):507-526.score: 12.0
    This paper reports a phenomenological sub-study of a larger project investigating the way Hong Kong Chinese staff tackled their own ethical dilemmas at work. A special analysis was conducted of eight dilemma cases arising from a request by a boss or superiorauthority to do something regarded as ethically wrong. In reports of most such cases, staff expressed feelings of contractual orinterpersonally based obligation to obey. They sought to save face and preserve harmony in their relationship with authority by choosingbetween “little (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Mª Ascensión Matás García (2013). Obedience as an evangelical counsel in consecrated life. Veritas 29:219-249.score: 12.0
    A través de este artículo se llegará a la conclusión de que la obediencia es una expresión de la dialéctica entre la encarnación de Cristo y su kenosis, superando la provisionalidad de las realidades terrenas y consagrando a Dios la facultad de disponer de la propia vida. Pero este caminar entre la vida y la muerte, encuentra su punto culminante en el misterio pascual de Jesucristo, el cual contribuye a la glorificación de Dios en el hombre, haciendo de la experiencia (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Joseph Shaw (2002). The Virtue of Obedience. Religious Studies 38 (1):63-75.score: 12.0
    In this paper I give an account and defence of the thought and practice associated with the notion of obedience in religious ethics, especially in reply to the claim that obedience is necessarily unconscientious. First, I argue that it is conscientious to give weight to commands if they are identifiable as pieces of authoritative advice, or, as theists commonly believe, if they have intrinsic moral force. Second, I argue that a theist's strictly moral reasons for fulfilling obligations are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Patrick Primeaux & John Beckley (1999). Double Bookkeeping: Hierarchical Obedience and Participative Cooperation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 19 (1):123 - 136.score: 12.0
    Rather than eliciting behavioral expectations of individuals for an appreciation of organizational ethics, we are focusing on the organization itself and the manner in which distinctive organizational structures assume their own respective behavioral expectations. The hierarchical organizational structure emphasizes obedience while the participative organizational structure emphasizes cooperation. Imposing the ethical virtues of one organizational structure onto another leads to conflict, and that conflict is reflective of a basic injustice which is (indirectly) organizational in cause but (directly) personal in effect. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Brendan Daly (2013). The Promise of Obedience of Diocesan Priests: What Does It Mean? Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (3):329.score: 12.0
    Daly, Brendan About a month before my ordination as a priest on 7 May 1977, my diocesan bishop asked me to come and see him at his office. He said after my ordination I was going to be appointed to Mairehau parish as an assistant priest. Two weeks later I was making my pre-ordination retreat and the bishop arrived to see me. He was embarrassed and said 'We have a problem. One parish priest won't take the assistant priest that I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Richard W. Momeyer (1982). Socrates on Obedience and Disobedience to the Law. Philosophy Research Archives 8:21-53.score: 12.0
    Considerable scholarship over the last dozen years has greatly increased our understanding of Apology and Crito. However, the knottiest problem between these dialogues--the frequently noted apparent contradiction between Apology 29c-30c and Crito 51b-c, between Socrates’ pledge to disobey a court order to give up philosophy and his argument that legal authority absolutely obligates a citizen to obedience--is far from being resolved. In the end I argue that this contradiction is unresolved, despite numerous ingenious attempts to eliminate it, because it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Phillip L. Quinn (1998). The Virtue of Obedience. Faith and Philosophy 15 (4):445-461.score: 12.0
    This paper is a critical study of Christians among the Virtues: Theological Conversations with Ancient and Modern Ethics by Stanley Hauerwas and Charles Pinches. It has four parts. First, I consider several possible responses to G. E. M. Anscombe’s famous challenge to modern moral philosophy in order to provide a framework in which the project of Hauerwas and Pinches can be located. Next I criticize their attempt to eliminate the realm of obligation from morality. Then I examine their treatment of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Patricia H. Werhane, Laura P. Hartman, Dennis Moberg, Elaine Englehardt, Michael Pritchard & Bidhan Parmar (2011). Social Constructivism, Mental Models, and Problems of Obedience. Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):103 - 118.score: 12.0
    There are important synergies for the next generation of ethical leaders based on the alignment of modified or adjusted mental models. This entails a synergistic application of moral imagination through collaborative input and critique, rather than "me too" obedience. In this article, we will analyze the Milgram results using frameworks relating to mental models (Werhane et al., Profitable partnerships for poverty alleviation, 2009), as well as work by Moberg on "ethics blind spots'' (Organizational Studies 27(3): 413-428, 2006), and by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. John Sabini & Maury Silver (1983). Dispositional Vs. Situational Interpretations of Milgram's Obedience Experiments: "The Fundamental Attributional Error". Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 13 (2):147–154.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Meredith Williams (1991). Blind Obedience: Rules, Community and the Individual. In Klaus Puhl (ed.), Meaning Scepticism. De Gruyter.score: 9.0
  29. Charles Helm & Mario Morelli (1979). Stanley Milgram and the Obedience Experiment: Authority, Legitimacy, and Human Action. Political Theory 7 (3):321-345.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Yitzhak Benbaji (2011). The Moral Power of Soldiers to Undertake the Duty of Obedience. Ethics 122 (1):43-73.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. W. Macmahon Ball (1932). The Basis of Political Obedience. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):173 – 187.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Mario F. Morelli (1983). Milgram's Dilemma of Obedience. Metaphilosophy 14 (3-4):183-189.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Charles R. Pigden & Grant R. Gillet (1996). Milgram, Method and Morality. Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (3):233-250.score: 9.0
    Milgram’s experiments, subjects were induced to inflict what they believed to be electric shocks in obedience to a man in a white coat. This suggests that many of us can be persuaded to torture, and perhaps kill, another person simply on the say-so of an authority figure. But the experiments have been attacked on methodological, moral and methodologico-moral grounds. Patten argues that the subjects probably were not taken in by the charade; Bok argues that lies should not be used (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Kimberley Brownlee (2004). Obedience, Conformity, and Deference. Res Publica 10 (3):267-274.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jeff McMahan (2011). Duty, Obedience, Desert, and Proportionality in War: A Response. Ethics 122 (1):135-167.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Richard Kraut (1981). Plato's Apology and Crito: Two Recent Studies:Socrates: Philosophy in Plato's Early Dialogues. Gerasimos Xenophon Santas; Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito. A. D. Woozley. [REVIEW] Ethics 91 (4):651-.score: 9.0
  37. A. Lugg (2011). Blind Obedience: Paradox and Learning in the Later Wittgenstein * by Meredith Williams. Analysis 71 (2):389-391.score: 9.0
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. F. L. McCay (1932). The Basis of Political Obedience. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 10 (4):290 – 298.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. W. A. Merrylees (1932). What is the Basis of Political Obedience? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 10 (4):268 – 289.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Philip Soper (2002). The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals. Cambridge University Press.score: 9.0
    Do citizens have an obligation to obey the law? This book differs from standard approaches by shifting from the language of obedience (orders) to that of deference (normative judgments). The popular view that law claims authority but does not have it is here reversed on both counts: Law does not claim authority but has it. Though the focus is on political obligation, the author approaches that issue indirectly by first developing a more general account of when deference is due (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. John Dunn (1982). Understanding Revolutions:States and Social Revolutions. Theda Skocpol; Injustice: The Social Bases of Obedience and Revolt. Barrington Moore. Ethics 92 (2):299-.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Stanley Milgram (1983). Reflections Onmorellis "Dilemma of Obedience". Metaphilosophy 14 (3-4):190-194.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Ruben Apressyan (2002). Obedience and Responsibility in Different Types of Military Ethics. Professional Ethics 10 (2/3/4):231-244.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. J. Dybikowski (1974). Socrates, Obedience, and the Law: Plato's Crito. Dialogue 13 (03):519-535.score: 9.0
  45. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1984). Socrates and Obedience to the Law. Apeiron 18 (1):10 - 18.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Norman Gulley (1980). A. D. Woozley: Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito. Pp. 160. London: Duckworth, 1979. £9·80. The Classical Review 30 (02):285-286.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Matti Häyry & Heta Häyry (1994). Obedience to Rules and Berkeley's Theological Utilitarianism. Utilitas 6 (02):233-.score: 9.0
  48. Darrel D. Colson (1989). Crito 51A-C: To What Does Socrates Owe Obedience? Phronesis 34 (1):27-55.score: 9.0
  49. Philip L. Quinn (1975). Religious Obedience and Moral Autonomy. Religious Studies 11 (3):265 - 281.score: 9.0
  50. Medieval Europe (2010). Paul J. Cornish is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan. He Defended His Dissertation, Rule and Subjection: The Concept of 'Dominium'in Augustine and Aquinas, at the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1995. His Publications Include:'John Courtney Murray and Thomas Aquinas on Obedience and the Civil Conversation', Vera Lex: Journal. [REVIEW] European Journal of Political Theory 9 (2):131-132.score: 9.0
1 — 50 / 355