Search results for 'Obedience (Law' (try it on Scholar)

115 found
Order:
  1. I. Obedience (2005). Enjoying the Law. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 6 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Ruth C. A. Higgins (2004). The Moral Limits of Law: Obedience, Respect, and Legitimacy. Oxford University Press.
    The Moral Limits of Law analyzes the related debates concerning the moral obligation to obey the law, conscientious citizenship, and state legitimacy. Modern societies are drawn in a tension between the centripetal pull of the local and the centrifugal stress of the global. Boundaries that once appeared permanent are now permeable: transnational legal, economic, and trade institutions increasingly erode the autonomy of states. Nonetheless transnational principles are still typically effected through state law. For law's subjects, this tension brings into focus (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3.  2
    Janet Sisson & A. D. Woozley (1983). Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito. Philosophical Quarterly 33 (130):103.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  4.  11
    Bjarne Melkevik (2002). Obedience, Law and the Military. Professional Ethics 10 (2/3/4):267-283.
  5. Bjarne Melkevik (2002). Obedience, Law and the Military. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 10 (2):267-283.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Luciano Venezia (2014). Hobbes' Two Accounts of Law and the Structure of Reasons for Political Obedience. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (3):282-298.
    Thomas Hobbes’s political theory contains conceptual theses on law, including an analysis of the way legal requirements affect practical reasoning. However, Hobbes’ account of law and the structure of reasons for political obedience is extremely ambiguous. In this paper, I show that Hobbes develops not one but two different accounts. Also, I argue that the two theories are in tension, something that Hobbes himself seems to recognize to some extent.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  44
    Kenneth R. Westphal (1992). Kant on the State, Law, and Obedience to Authority in the Alleged 'Anti-Revolutionary' Writings. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:383-426.
    The tension between Kant’s egalitarian conception of persons as ends in themselves and his rejection of the right of revolution has been widely discussed. The crucial issue is more fundamental: Is Kant’s defense of absolute obedience consistent with his own principle of legitimate law, that legitimate law is compatible with the Categorical Imperative? Resolving this apparent inconsistency resolves the subsidiary inconsistencies that have been debated in the literature. I argue that Kant’s legal principles contain two distinct grounds of obligation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  64
    Ernest J. Weinrib (1982). Obedience to the Law in Plato's Crito. American Journal of Jurisprudence 27 (1):85-108.
    Plato's Crito is not a treatise on obedience to the law, but a dialogue whose interpretation is not determined by its surface meaning. The initial dream is not mere ornamentation; rather it points to the range of possibilities in Socrates' situation. The speeches of the Laws, with which the dialogue closes, are not intended to be philosophically cogent, since they are inconsistent with the principles laid out in the preceding conversation between Socrates and Crito. The arguments of the Laws (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. A. H. Campbell (1965). Obligation and Obedience to Law. [Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press].
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  11
    Richard W. Momeyer (1982). Socrates on Obedience and Disobedience to the Law. Philosophy Research Archives 8:21-53.
    Considerable scholarship over the last dozen years has greatly increased our understanding of Apology and Crito. However, the knottiest problem between these dialogues--the frequently noted apparent contradiction between Apology 29c-30c and Crito 51b-c, between Socrates’ pledge to disobey a court order to give up philosophy and his argument that legal authority absolutely obligates a citizen to obedience--is far from being resolved. In the end I argue that this contradiction is unresolved, despite numerous ingenious attempts to eliminate it, because it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Monroe C. Beardsley (1964). Equality and Obedience to Law. In Sidney Hook (ed.), Law and Philosophy. [New York]New York University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12. Ruth C. A. Higgins (2004). The Moral Limits of Law: Obedience, Respect, and Legitimacy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Moral Limits of Law analyses the related debates concerning the moral obligation to obey the law, conscientious citizenship, and state legitimacy. Incorporating a comprehensive critical analysis of the methodology and substance of these debates in legal, political, and moral philosophy, it proposes an original theory of duty grounded in respect for persons, which accommodates the contemporary social tension between local and global obligations.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Sidney Hook (1964). Law, Justice, and Obedience. In Law and Philosophy. [New York]New York University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  22
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1984). Socrates and Obedience to the Law. Apeiron 18 (1):10 - 18.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  15.  7
    Glenn Lesses (2008). Law and Obedience. Ancient Philosophy 5 (2):318-322.
  16. A. J. Simmons (1992). Obedience to Law. In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. Garland Publishing Inc 918--21.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  31
    Richard Kraut (1981). Plato's Apology and Crito: Two Recent Studies:Socrates: Philosophy in Plato's Early Dialogues. Gerasimos Xenophon Santas; Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito. A. D. Woozley. [REVIEW] Ethics 91 (4):651-.
  18.  18
    J. Dybikowski (1974). Socrates, Obedience, and the Law: Plato's Crito. Dialogue 13 (3):519-535.
  19.  8
    G. W. T. (1980). Law and Obedience. Review of Metaphysics 34 (2):403-404.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  15
    Glenn Lesses (1985). Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito. Ancient Philosophy 5 (2):318-322.
  21.  17
    Norman Gulley (1980). A. D. Woozley: Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito. Pp. 160. London: Duckworth, 1979. £9·80. The Classical Review 30 (02):285-286.
  22.  2
    Henrik Jøker Bjerre (2005). Enjoying the Law. On a Possible Conflict Between Kant's Views on Obedience and Enjoyment. SATS 6 (2):114-127.
  23.  1
    Leon Pearl (1982). A. D. Woozley., Law and Obedience. The Arguments of Plato's Crito. [REVIEW] International Studies in Philosophy 14 (1):115-117.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  1
    Marlène Ryzman (1992). Theseus' Obedience to the Directives of Natural Law in Sophocles' Oedipus Coloneus. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 70 (1):5-14.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  1
    S. I. Shuman (1966). The Defense of "Obedience to Superior Orders" in International Law. By Yoram Dinstein. A. W. Sijthoff, 1965. Pp. XVI, 278. [REVIEW] American Journal of Jurisprudence 11 (1):139-143.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Gwynneth Matthews (1980). Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito. Philosophical Books 21 (4):204-206.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. J. Muguerza (2004). The Obedience to Law and the Imperative to Dissent. Filozofia 59 (3-4):250-262.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Janet Sisson (1983). A. D. Woozley, "Law and Obedience". Philosophical Quarterly 33 (130):103.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Nicholas D. Smith (1984). Socrates and Obedience to the Law. Apeiron 18 (1).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. C. C. W. Taylor (1981). WOOZLEY, A. D. "Law and Obedience: The Arguments of Plato's Crito". [REVIEW] Mind 90:608.
  31.  18
    Philip Soper (2002). The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals. Cambridge University Press.
    Do citizens have an obligation to obey the law? This book differs from standard approaches by shifting from the language of obedience (orders) to that of deference (normative judgments). The popular view that law claims authority but does not have it is here reversed on both counts: Law does not claim authority but has it. Though the focus is on political obligation, the author approaches that issue indirectly by first developing a more general account of when deference is due (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  32.  12
    Govert den Hartogh (2002). Mutual Expectations: A Conventionalist Theory of Law. Kluwer Law International.
    The law persists because people have reasons to comply with its rules. What characterizes those reasons is their interdependence: each of us only has a reason to comply because he or she expects the others to comply for the same reasons. The rules may help us to solve coordination problems, but the interaction patterns regulated by them also include Prisoner's Dilemma games, Division problems and Assurance problems. In these "games" the rules can only persist if people can be expected to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  33.  59
    Mark R. Reiff (2005). Punishment, Compensation, and Law: A Theory of Enforceability. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive study of the meaning and measure of enforceability. While we have long debated what restraints should govern the conduct of our social life, we have paid relatively little attention to the question of what it means to make a restraint enforceable. Focusing on the enforceability of legal rights but also addressing the enforceability of moral rights and social conventions, Mark Reiff explains how we use punishment and compensation to make restraints operative in the world. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  34.  24
    Nico Keijzer (1978). Military Obedience. Sijthoff & Noordhoff, [International Publishers].
    PART I PROLEGOMENA ACTING ON ORDERS "First, words are our tools, and, as a minimum, we should use clean tools: we should know what we mean and what we do ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35. Domingo Blanco Fernández (2010). De la intención en el respeto al derecho (Respuesta al profesor Kervégan). Logos: Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 42 (1):25 - 35.
    (I) From a firm distinction between ethics and right, the Kantian Rechtslehre holds that the demand to adopt the maxim to act according to the right is an ethical demand. Also J.F. Kervégan defends that individuals should recognize the ethical obligation to respect juridical rules, but this does not mean that right depends on ethics, because, in strict right, internal disposition or intention could not be considered as motive for the rightful action. Law regulates and judges the external actions and (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Thomas M. Hughes (2012). Is Political Obligation Necessary for Obedience? Hobbes on Hostility, War and Obligation. Teoria Politica 2:77-99.
    Contemporary debates on obedience and consent, such as those between Thomas Senor and A. John Simmons, suggest that either political obligation must exist as a concept or there must be natural duty of justice accessible to us through reason. Without one or the other, de facto political institutions would lack the requisite moral framework to engage in legitimate coercion. This essay suggests that both are unnecessary in order to provide a conceptual framework in which obedience to coercive political (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  62
    Christopher Heath Wellman (2005). Is There a Duty to Obey the Law? Cambridge University Press.
    The central question in political philosophy is whether political states have the right to coerce their constituents and whether citizens have a moral duty to obey the commands of their state. Christopher Heath Wellman and A. John Simmons defend opposing answers to this question. Wellman bases his argument on samaritan obligations to perform easy rescues, arguing that each of us has a moral duty to obey the law as his or her fair share of the communal samaritan chore (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  38. Meir Dan-Cohen (2002). Harmful Thoughts: Essays on Law, Self, and Morality. Princeton University Press.
    In these writings by one of our most creative legal philosophers, Meir Dan-Cohen explores the nature of the self and its response to legal commands and mounts a challenge to some prevailing tenets of legal theory and the neighboring moral, political, and economic thought. The result is an insider's critique of liberalism that extends contemporary liberalism's Kantian strand, combining it with postmodernist ideas about the contingent and socially constructed self to build a thoroughly original perspective on some of the most (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  39. Mark C. Murphy (2006). Natural Law in Jurisprudence and Politics. Cambridge University Press.
    Natural law is a perennial though poorly represented and understood issue in political philosophy and the philosophy of law. Mark C. Murphy argues that the central thesis of natural law jurisprudence--that law is backed by decisive reasons for compliance--sets the agenda for natural law political philosophy, which demonstrates how law gains its binding force by way of the common good of the political community. Murphy's work ranges over the central questions of natural law jurisprudence and political philosophy, including the formulation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  40.  16
    Neil MacCormick (2008). Practical Reason in Law and Morality. Oxford University Press.
    Incentives and reasons -- Values and human nature -- Right and wrong -- Questions of trust -- Autonomy and freedom -- Obedience, freedom, and engagement : or utility? -- Society, property, and commerce -- On justice -- Using freedom well -- Judging : legal cases and moral questions -- Practical reason, law, and state.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  48
    Roslyn Weiss (1998). Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato's Crito. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Roslyn Weiss contends that, contrary to prevailing notions, Plato's Crito does not show an allegiance between Socrates and the state that condemned him. Denying that the speech of the Laws represents the views of Socrates, Weiss deftly brings to light numerous indications that Socrates provides to the attentive reader that he and the Laws are not partners but antagonists in the argument and that he is singularly unimpressed by the case against escaping prison presented by the Laws. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  42.  2
    J. C. Smith (1976). Legal Obligation. University of Toronto Press.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  43.  88
    Carl Wellman (ed.) (2002). Rights and Duties. Routledge.
    Volume Six of the Six-Volume set, Rights and Duties joins the most significant writings in two crucial areas of ethical reflection and behavior. This collection provides students and scholars with the history of how humanity has argued for and against entitlements, rights, and protections for itself, and how humanity has argued for and against obligations, duties, and social responsibilities toward others.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  21
    Gary Chartier (2012). Enforcing the Law and Being a State. Law and Philosophy 31 (1):99-123.
    Many anarchists believe that a stateless society could and should feature laws. It might appear that, in so believing, they are caught in a contradiction. The anarchist objects to the state because its authority does not rest on actual consent, and using force to secure compliance with law in a stateless society seems objectionable for the same reason. Some people in a stateless society will have consented to some laws or law-generating mechanisms and some to others – while some will (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Abner Greene (2012). Against Obligation: The Multiple Sources of Authority in a Liberal Democracy. Harvard University Press.
    Introduction -- Against political obligation -- Accommodating our plural obligations -- Against interpretive obligation to the past -- Against interpretive obligation to the Supreme Court.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. R. George Wright (1992). Legal and Political Obligation: Classic and Contemporary Texts and Commentary. University Press of America.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. T. R. S. Allan (2009). Law, Justice and Integrity: The Paradox of Wicked Laws. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (4):705-728.
    Ronald Dworkin's theory of law forges a close connection between questions about the truth of propositions of law and the question of political obligation: law as integrity is a theory of legal practice that purports to explain, not only how the content of law is determined, but also why the law—in ordinary cases—imposes an obligation of obedience. The theory (as presented) is ultimately incoherent. If we accept Dworkin's theory of the grounds of law we are obliged to reject his (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  53
    Hutan Ashrafian (2015). AIonAI: A Humanitarian Law of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (1):29-40.
    The enduring progression of artificial intelligence and cybernetics offers an ever-closer possibility of rational and sentient robots. The ethics and morals deriving from this technological prospect have been considered in the philosophy of artificial intelligence, the design of automatons with roboethics and the contemplation of machine ethics through the concept of artificial moral agents. Across these categories, the robotics laws first proposed by Isaac Asimov in the twentieth century remain well-recognised and esteemed due to their specification of preventing human harm, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49. William A. Edmundson (2010). Political Authority, Moral Powers and the Intrinsic Value of Obedience. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (1):179-191.
    Three concepts—authority, obedience and obligation—are central to understanding law and political institutions. The three are also involved in the legitimation of the state: an apology for the state has to make a normative case for the state’s authority, for its right to command obedience, and for the citizen’s obligation to obey the state’s commands. Recent discussions manifest a cumulative scepticism about the apologist’s task. Getting clear about the three concepts is, of..
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50.  76
    Andrews Reath (2003). Value and Law in Kant's Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Ethics 114 (1):127-155.
    Paul Guyer’s Kant on Freedom, Law, and Happiness is a collection of essays written over a period of ten years on the roles of freedom, reason, law, and happiness in Kant’s practical philosophy. The centrality of these concepts has always been acknowledged, but Guyer proposes a different way to understand their interconnections. Kant extols respect for moral law and conformity to moral principle for its own sake while at the same time celebrating the value of human freedom and autonomy. Guyer (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 115