Search results for 'Object' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Casey O'Callaghan (2008). Object Perception: Vision and Audition. Philosophy Compass 3 (4):803-829.score: 18.0
    Vision has been the primary focus of naturalistic philosophical research concerning perception and perceptual experience. Guided by visual experience and vision science, many philosophers have focused upon theoretical issues dealing with the perception of objects. Recently, however, hearing researchers have discussed auditory objects. I present the case for object perception in vision, and argue that an analog of object perception occurs in auditory perception. I propose a notion of an auditory object that is stronger than just that (...)
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  2. Julien A. Deonna & Klaus R. Scherer (2010). The Case of the Disappearing Intentional Object: Constraints on a Definition of Emotion. Emotion Review 2 (1):44-52.score: 18.0
    Taking our lead from Solomon’s emphasis on the importance of the intentional object of emotion, we review the history of repeated attempts to make this object disappear. We adduce evidence suggesting that in the case of James and Schachter, the intentional object got lost unintentionally. By contrast, modern constructivists (in particular Barrett) seem quite determined to deny the centrality of the intentional object in accounting for the occurrence of emotions. Griffiths, however, downplays the role objects have (...)
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  3. Henry Laycock, Object. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    In The Principles of Mathematics, Russell writes: Whatever may be an object of thought, or may occur in any true or false proposition, or can be counted as one, I call a term. This, then, is the widest word in the philosophical vocabulary. I shall use as synonymous with it the words unit, individual and entity. The first two emphasize the fact that every term is one, while the third is derived from the fact that every term has being, (...)
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  4. Thomas Hofweber (2005). Supervenience and Object-Dependent Properties. Journal of Philosophy 102 (1):5-32.score: 18.0
    I argue that the semantic thesis of direct reference and the meta- physical thesis of the supervenience of the non-physical on the physical cannot both be true. The argument first develops a necessary condition for supervenience, a so-called conditional locality requirement, which is then shown to be incompatible with some physical object having object dependent properties, which in turn is required for the thesis of direct reference to be true. We apply this argument to formulate a new argument (...)
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  5. Dany Nobus (2013). That Obscure Object of Psychoanalysis. Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):163-187.score: 18.0
    This essay examines how psychoanalytic conceptions of the subject and the object in the works of Freud and Lacan may contribute to a re-examination of the vexed issue of the subject–object relationship in science, philosophy and epistemology. For Freud, the ego is the essential subject, yet he regarded it as an always already objectified subject, which is objectively thinkable yet never subjectively knowable qua subject. Lacan conceptualised this Freudian principle of subjectivity with his notion of the divided (barred) (...)
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  6. Anthony Everett (2013). Disquotationalism, Reference, and Object Dependence. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):939-955.score: 18.0
    In this paper I consider whether disquotationalist accounts of reference can accommodate our intuitions concerning reference. I argue that, if our intuitions are to be satisfactorily accommodated, the disquotationalist must regard the semantic content of a referring singular term as depending upon the object which is the intuitive referent of that singular term. Granted this, however, the way then looks open for the inflationist about reference to simply identify the object dependence relation with the reference relation. I consider (...)
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  7. Marc De Kesel (2013). Misers or Lovers? How a Reflection on Christian Mysticism Caused a Shift in Jacques Lacan's Object Theory. Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):189-208.score: 18.0
    In his sixth seminar, Desire and Its Interpretation (1956–1957), Lacan patiently elaborates his theory of the ‘phantasm’ ($◊a), in which the object of desire (object small a) is ascribed a constitutive role in the architecture of the libidinal subject. In that seminar, Lacan shows his fascination for an aphorism of the twentieth century Christian mystic Simone Weil in her assertion: “to ascertain exactly what the miser whose treasure was stolen lost: thus we would learn much.” This is why, (...)
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  8. Elizabeth Coppock (2013). A Semantic Solution to the Problem of Hungarian Object Agreement. Natural Language Semantics 21 (4):345-371.score: 18.0
    This paper offers a semantically-based solution to the problem of predicting whether a verb will display the subjective conjugation or the objective conjugation in Hungarian. This alternation correlates with the definiteness of the object, but definiteness is not a completely reliable indicator of the subjective/objective alternation, nor is specificity. A prominent view is that the subjective/objective alternation is conditioned by the syntactic category of the object, but this view has also been shown to be untenable. This paper offers (...)
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  9. Sara Bernal (2005). Object Lessons: Spelke Principles and Psychological Explanation. Philosophical Psychology 18 (3):289-312.score: 18.0
    There is general agreement that from the first few months of life, our apprehension of physical objects accords, in some sense, with certain principles. In one philosopher's locution, we are 'perceptually sensitive' to physical principles describing the behavior of objects. But in what does this accordance or sensitivity consist? Are these principles explicitly represented or merely 'implemented'? And what sort of explanation do we accomplish in claiming that our object perception accords with these principles? My main goal here is (...)
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  10. Arda Denkel (1996). Object and Property. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Professor Arda Denkel argues here that objects are nothing more than bundles of properties. From this point of view he tackles some central questions of ontology: how is an object distinct from others; how does it remain the same while it changes through time? A second contention is that properties are particular entities restricted to the objects they inhabit. The appearance that they exist generally, in a multitude of things, is due to the way we conceptualise them. Other problems (...)
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  11. Ingmar Persson (1999). Awareness of One's Body as Subject and Object. Philosophical Explorations 2 (1):70-76.score: 18.0
    This paper rejects Hume's famous claim that we never perceive our selves, by arguing that, under conditions specified, our perception of our bodies is perception of our selves. It takes as its point of departure Quassim Cassam's defence of a position to a similar effect but puts a different interpretation on the distinction between perceiving the body as an object, having spatial attributes, and perceiving it as a self or subject of experiences.
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  12. Glyn W. Humphreys & Emer M. E. Forde (2001). Hierarchies, Similarity, and Interactivity in Object Recognition: “Category-Specific” Neuropsychological Deficits. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):453-476.score: 18.0
    Category-specific impairments of object recognition and naming are among the most intriguing disorders in neuropsychology, affecting the retrieval of knowledge about either living or nonliving things. They can give us insight into the nature of our representations of objects: Have we evolved different neural systems for recognizing different categories of object? What kinds of knowledge are important for recognizing particular objects? How does visual similarity within a category influence object recognition and representation? What is the nature (...)
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  13. Gesa Lindemann (2009). From Experimental Interaction to the Brain as the Epistemic Object of Neurobiology. Human Studies 32 (2):153 - 181.score: 18.0
    This article argues that understanding everyday practices in neurobiological labs requires us to take into account a variety of different action positions: self-conscious social actors, technical artifacts, conscious organisms, and organisms being merely alive. In order to understand the interactions among such diverse entities, highly differentiated conceptual tools are required. Drawing on the theory of the German philosopher and sociologist Helmuth Plessner, the paper analyzes experimenters as self-conscious social persons who recognize monkeys as conscious organisms. Integrating Plessner’s ideas into the (...)
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  14. Kazimierz Twardowski (1977). On the Content and Object of Presentations: A Psychological Investigation. Nijhoff.score: 18.0
    . ACT, CONTENT, AND OBJECT OF THE PRESENTATION It is one of the best known positions of psychology, hardly contested by anyone, that every mental phenomenon ...
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  15. Chien-Hsing Ho, Emptiness as Subject-Object Unity: Sengzhao on the Way Things Truly Are.score: 18.0
    Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a leading Chinese Mādhyamika philosopher, holds that the myriad things are empty, and that they are, at bottom, the same as emptiness qua the way things truly are. In this paper, I distinguish the level of the myriad things from that of the way things truly are and call them, respectively, the ontic and the ontological levels. For Sengzhao, the myriad things at the ontic level are indeterminate and empty, and he equates the way things truly are (...)
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  16. Käthe Schneider (2012). The Subject-Object Transformations and 'Bildung'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (3):302-311.score: 18.0
    Bildung, a German pedagogical term with the sense of ‘educating oneself’, refers to some of the most complex human activities. It is constitutive for human existence, because it is related to the characteristic of meaning. Because of the great relevance of Bildung for people, education is essential for furthering it. The two purposes of this contribution are: i. to examine the structure of one main process component of Bildung, namely the process of designing an image (Bild) of the changes to (...)
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  17. Terence V. Sewards & Mark A. Sewards (2002). On the Neural Correlates of Object Recognition Awareness: Relationship to Computational Activities and Activities Mediating Perceptual Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):51-77.score: 18.0
    Based on theoretical considerations of Aurell (1979) and Block (1995), we argue that object recognition awareness is distinct from purely sensory awareness and that the former is mediated by neuronal activities in areas that are separate and distinct from cortical sensory areas. We propose that two of the principal functions of neuronal activities in sensory cortex, which are to provide sensory awareness and to effect the computations that are necessary for object recognition, are dissociated. We provide examples of (...)
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  18. Rudolph Bauer (2013). Empty Mind, Transitional Space and The Dissolving of Self Object Function. Transmission 6.score: 18.0
    This paper focuses on empty mind, transitional space and the dissolving of the self object function.
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  19. Sigi Jöttkandt (2013). The Cornered Object of Psychoanalysis: Las Meninas, Jacques Lacan and Henry James. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):291-309.score: 18.0
    Long recognised as a painting ‘about’ painting, Velázquez’s Las Meninas comes to Lacan’s aid as he explicates the object a in Seminar XIII, The Object of Psychoanalysis (1965–1966). The famous seventeenth century painting provides Lacan with a visual mapping of the ‘ghost story’ he discovers in the Cartesian cogito, insofar as it depicts the unravelling of the Cartesian representational project at the moment of its founding gesture. This article traces Lacan’s argument as he turns to art, linear perspective (...)
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  20. Shaun P. Vecera (2000). Toward a Biased Competition Account of Object-Based Segregation and Attention. Brain and Mind 1 (3):353-384.score: 18.0
    Because the visual system cannot process all of the objects, colors, and features present in a visual scene, visual attention allows some visual stimuli to be selected and processed over others. Most research on visual attention has focused on spatial or location-based attention, in which the locations occupied by stimuli are selected for further processing. Recent research, however, has demonstrated the importance of objects in organizing (or segregating) visual scenes and guiding attentional selection. Because of the long history of spatial (...)
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  21. Michele Burigo & Simona Sacchi (2013). Object Orientation Affects Spatial Language Comprehension. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1471-1492.score: 18.0
    Typical spatial descriptions, such as “The car is in front of the house,” describe the position of a located object (LO; e.g., the car) in space relative to a reference object (RO) whose location is known (e.g., the house). The orientation of the RO affects spatial language comprehension via the reference frame selection process. However, the effects of the LO's orientation on spatial language have not received great attention. This study explores whether the pure geometric information of the (...)
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  22. Irina M. Harris & Paul E. Dux (2005). Orientation-Invariant Object Recognition: Evidence From Repetition Blindness. Cognition 95 (1):73-93.score: 18.0
    The question of whether object recognition is orientation-invariant or orientation-dependent was investigated using a repetition blindness (RB) paradigm. In RB, the second occurrence of a repeated stimulus is less likely to be reported, compared to the occurrence of a different stimulus, if it occurs within a short time of the first presentation. This failure is usually interpreted as a difficulty in assigning two separate episodic tokens to the same visual type. Thus, RB can provide useful information about which representations (...)
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  23. Ian S. Hargreaves, Gemma A. Leonard, Penny M. Pexman, Daniel J. Pittman, Paul D. Siakaluk & Bradley G. Goodyear (2012). The Neural Correlates of the Body-Object Interaction Effect in Semantic Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:22-22.score: 18.0
    The semantic richness dimension referred to as body-object interaction (BOI) measures perceptions of the ease with which people can physically interact with words’ referents. Previous studies have shown facilitated lexical and semantic processing for words rated high in BOI (e.g., belt) than for words rated low in BOI (e.g., sun) (e.g., Siakaluk, Pexman, Sears, Wilson, Locheed, & Owen, 2008b). These BOI effects have been taken as evidence that embodied information is relevant to word recognition. However, to date there is (...)
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  24. Adrian Johnston (2013). “The Object in the Mirror of Genetic Transcendentalism: Lacan's Objet Petit a Between Visibility and Invisibility,”. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):251-269.score: 18.0
    One of the more superficially perplexing features of Lacan’s notion of objet petit a is the fact that he simultaneously characterizes it as both non-specularizable (i.e., incapable of being captured in spatio-temporal representations) and specular (i.e., incarnated in visible avatars). This assignment of the apparently contradictory attributes of visibility and invisibility to object a is a reflection of this object’s strange position at the intersection of transcendental and empirical dimensions. Indeed, this object, which Lacan holds up as (...)
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  25. Richard J. Stevenson (2014). Object Concepts in the Chemical Senses. Cognitive Science 38 (2).score: 18.0
    This paper examines the applicability of the object concept to the chemical senses, by evaluating them against a set of criteria for object-hood. Taste and chemesthesis do not generate objects. Their parts, perceptible from birth, never combine. Orthonasal olfaction (sniffing) presents a strong case for generating objects. Odorants have many parts yet they are perceived as wholes, this process is based on learning, and there is figure-ground segregation. While flavors are multimodal representations bound together by learning, there is (...)
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  26. Martin Wiesmann & Alumit Ishai (2010). Training Facilitates Object Recognition in Cubist Paintings. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 18.0
    To the naïve observer, cubist paintings contain geometrical forms in which familiar objects are hardly recognizable, even in the presence of a meaningful title. We used fMRI to test whether a short training session about Cubism would facilitate object recognition in paintings by Picasso, Braque and Gris. Subjects, who had no formal art education, were presented with titled or untitled cubist paintings and scrambled images, and performed object recognition tasks. Relative to the control group, trained subjects recognized more (...)
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  27. André W. Keizer Bernhard Hommel (2012). Binding Success and Failure: Evidence for the Spontaneous Integration of Perceptual Features and Object Evaluations. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Humans represent perceptual events in a distributed, feature-specific fashion, which called for some sort of feature integration. It has been suggested that processing an event leads to the creation of a temporary binding of the corresponding feature codes—an object file. Here we show that object files do not only comprise of perceptual feature codes but also include codes that reflect evaluations of the perceptual event.
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  28. Oliver J. Board, Kim-Sau Chung & Burkhard C. Schipper (2011). Two Models of Unawareness: Comparing the Object-Based and the Subjective-State-Space Approaches. Synthese 179 (1):13 - 34.score: 18.0
    Over the past 20 years or so, a small but growing literature has emerged with the aim of modeling agents who are unaware of certain things. In this paper we compare two different approaches to modeling unawareness: the object-based approach of Board and Chung (Object-based unawareness: theory and applications. University of Minnesota, Mimeo, 2008) and the subjective-state-space approach of Heifetz et al. (J Econ Theory 130: 78-94,2006). In particular, we show that subjectivestate-space models (henceforth HMS structures) can be (...)
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  29. Alasdair Daniel Francis Clarke, Moreno I. Coco & Frank Keller (2013). The Impact of Attentional, Linguistic and Visual Features During Object Naming. Frontiers in Psychology 4:927.score: 18.0
    Object detection and identification are fundamental visual tasks and recent work suggests that it is primarily objects, rather than low-level salient regions, that attract our attention. This raises the question of which objects are important in the context of a visual scene. The current eye-tracking study investigates how different features (attentional, visual and linguistic) influence the likelihood that a given object in a scene will be named. We carried out an object naming task involving 24 participants and (...)
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  30. Randall O'Reilly Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus (2012). The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. (...)
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  31. Isabelle Ecuyer-Dab & Michèle Robert (2007). The Female Advantage in Object Location Memory According to the Foraging Hypothesis: A Critical Analysis. [REVIEW] Human Nature 18 (4):365-385.score: 18.0
    According to the evolutionary hypothesis of Silverman and Eals (1992, Sex differences in spatial abilities: Evolutionary theory and data. In J. H. Barkow, L. Cosmides, & J. Tooby (Eds.), The adapted mind: Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture (pp. 533–549). Oxford: Oxford University Press), women evolutionary hypothesis, women surpass men in object location memory as a result of a sexual division in foraging activities among early humans. After surveying the main anthropological information on ancestral sex-related foraging, we review (...)
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  32. Susan M. Rivera Faraz Farzin (2010). Dynamic Object Representations in Infants with and Without Fragile X Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 18.0
    Our visual world is dynamic in nature. The ability to encode, mentally represent, and track an object’s identity as it moves across time and space is critical for integrating and maintaining a complete and coherent view of the world. Here we investigated dynamic object processing in typically developing (TD) infants and infants with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a single-gene disorder associated with deficits in dorsal stream functioning. We used the violation of expectation method to assess infants’ visual response (...)
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  33. Assaf Harel, Dwight Kravitz & Chris I. Baker (2013). Beyond Perceptual Expertise: Revisiting the Neural Substrates of Expert Object Recognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:885.score: 18.0
    Real-world expertise provides a valuable opportunity to understand how experience shapes human behavior and neural function. In the visual domain, the study of expert object recognition, such as in car enthusiasts or bird watchers, has produced a large, growing, and often-controversial literature. Here, we synthesize this literature, focusing primarily on results from functional brain imaging, and propose an interactive framework that incorporates the impact of high-level factors, such as attention and conceptual knowledge, in supporting expertise. This framework contrasts with (...)
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  34. Bruce M. Hood & Laurie Santos (eds.) (2009). The Origins of Object Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Do humans start life with the capacity to detect and mentally represent the objects around them? Or is our object knowledge instead derived only as the result of prolonged experience with the external world? Are we simply able to perceive objects by watching their actions in the world, or do we have to act on objects ourselves in order to learn about their behavior? Finally, do we come to know all aspects of objects in the same way, or are (...)
     
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  35. Marius V. Peelen Jaap Munneke, Valentina Brentari (2013). The Influence of Scene Context on Object Recognition is Independent of Attentional Focus. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Humans can quickly and accurately recognize objects within briefly presented natural scenes. Previous work has provided evidence that scene context contributes to this process, demonstrating improved naming of objects that were presented in semantically consistent scenes (e.g., a sandcastle on a beach) relative to semantically inconsistent scenes (e.g., a sandcastle on a football field). The current study was aimed at investigating which processes underlie the scene consistency effect. Specifically, we tested: 1) whether the effect is due to increased visual feature (...)
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  36. Marni Bartlett James William Tanaka, Justin Kantner (2012). How Category Structure Influences the Perception of Object Similarity: The Atypicality Bias. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Why do some faces appear more similar than others? Beyond structural factors, we speculate that similarity is governed by the organization of faces located in a multi-dimensional face space. To test this hypothesis, we morphed a typical face with an atypical face. If similarity judgments are guided purely by their physical properties, the morph should be perceived to be equally similar to its typical parent as its atypical parent. However, contrary to the structural prediction, our results showed that the morph (...)
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  37. Matt Craddock Jasna Martinovic, Rebecca Lawson (2012). Time Course of Information Processing in Visual and Haptic Object Classification. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Vision identifies objects rapidly and efficiently. In contrast, object recognition by touch is much slower. Furthermore, haptics usually serially accumulates information from different parts of objects, whereas vision typically processes object information in parallel. Is haptic object identification slower simply due to sequential information acquisition and the resulting memory load or due to more fundamental processing differences between the senses? To compare the time course of visual and haptic object recognition, we slowed visual processing using a (...)
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  38. Maciej Kosilo, Sophie M. Wuerger, Matt Craddock, Ben J. Jennings, Amelia R. Hunt & Jasna Martinovic (2013). Low-Level and High-Level Modulations of Fixational Saccades and High Frequency Oscillatory Brain Activity in a Visual Object Classification Task. Frontiers in Psychology 4:948.score: 18.0
    Until recently induced gamma-band activity (GBA) was considered a neural marker of cortical object representation. However induced GBA in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is susceptible to artifacts caused by miniature fixational saccades. Recent studies have demonstrated that fixational saccades also reflect high-level representational processes. Do high-level as opposed to low-level factors influence fixational saccades? What is the effect of these factors on artifact-free GBA? To investigate this, we conducted separate eye tracking and EEG experiments using identical designs. Participants classified line (...)
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  39. Linda B. Smith Meagan Yee, Susan S. Jones (2012). Changes in Visual Object Recognition Precede the Shape Bias in Early Noun Learning. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Two of the most formidable skills that characterize human beings are language and our prowess in visual object recognition. They may also be developmentally intertwined. Two experiments, a large sample cross-sectional study and a smaller sample 6-month longitudinal study of 18- 24 month olds tested a hypothesized developmental link between changes in the visual object representation and noun learning. Previous findings in visual object recognition indicate that children’s ability to recognize common basic level categories from sparse structural (...)
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  40. Thomas J. Palmeri Michael L. Mack (2011). The Timing of Visual Object Categorization. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    An object can be categorized at different levels of abstraction: as natural or man-made, animal or plant, bird or dog, or as a Northern Cardinal or Pyrrhuloxia. There has been growing interest in understanding how quickly categorizations at different levels are made and how the timing of those perceptual decisions changes with experience. We specifically contrast two perspectives on the timing of object categorization at different levels of abstraction. By one account, the relative timing implies a relative timing (...)
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  41. Dagmar Müller, Andreas Widmann & Erich Schröger (2013). Object-Related Regularities Are Processed Automatically: Evidence From the Visual Mismatch Negativity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    One of the most challenging tasks of our visual systems is to structure and integrate the enormous amount of incoming information into distinct coherent objects. It is an ongoing debate whether or not the formation of visual objects requires attention. Implicit behavioural measures suggest that object formation can occur for task-irrelevant and unattended visual stimuli. The present study investigated pre-attentive visual object formation by combining implicit behavioural measures and an electrophysiological indicator of pre-attentive visual irregularity detection, the visual (...)
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  42. A. D. Pellegrini & David F. Bjorklund (2004). The Ontogeny and Phylogeny of Children's Object and Fantasy Play. Human Nature 15 (1):23-43.score: 18.0
    We examine the ontogeny and phylogeny of object and fantasy play from a functional perspective. Each form of play is described from an evolutionary perspective in terms of its place in the total time and energy budgets of human and nonhuman juveniles. As part of discussion of functions of play, we examine sex differences, particularly as they relate to life in the environment of evolutionary adaptedness and economic activities of human and nonhuman primates. Object play may relate to (...)
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  43. David J. Jilk Randall C. O'Reilly, Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus (2013). Recurrent Processing During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    How does the brain learn to recognize objects visually, and perform this difficult feat robustly in the face of many sources of ambiguity and variability? We present a computational model based on the biology of the relevant visual pathways that learns to reliably recognize 100 different object categories in the face of of naturally-occurring variability in location, rotation, size, and lighting. The model exhibits robustness to highly ambiguous, partially occluded inputs. Both the unified, biologically plausible learning mechanism and the (...)
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  44. Thomas Serre Sébastien M. Crouzet (2011). What Are the Visual Features Underlying Rapid Object Recognition? Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    Research progress in machine vision has been very significant in recent years. Robust face detection and identification algorithms are already readily available to consumers, and modern computer vision algorithms for generic object recognition are now coping with the richness and complexity of natural visual scenes. Unlike early vision models of object recognition that emphasized the role of figure-ground segmentation and spatial information between parts, recent successful approaches are based on the computation of loose collections of image features without (...)
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  45. Laura Elizabeth Thomas & Adriane E. Seiffert (2011). How Many Objects Are You Worth? Quantification of the Self-Motion Load on Multiple Object Tracking. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    Perhaps walking and chewing gum is effortless, but walking and tracking moving objects is not. Multiple object tracking is impaired by walking from one location to another, suggesting that updating location of the self puts demands on object tracking processes. Here, we quantified the cost of self-motion in terms of the tracking load. Participants in a virtual environment tracked a variable number of targets (1-5) among distractors while either staying in one place or moving along a path that (...)
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  46. Cody Tousignant & Penny M. Pexman (2012). Flexible Recruitment of Semantic Richness: Context Modulates Body-Object Interaction Effects in Lexical-Semantic Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:53-53.score: 18.0
    Body-object interaction (BOI) is a semantic richness variable that measures the perceived ease with which the human body can physically interact with a word’s referent. Lexical and semantic processing is facilitated when words are associated with relatively more bodily experience (high BOI words, e.g., belt). To date, BOI effects have been examined in only one semantic decision context (is it imageable?). It has been argued that semantic processing is dynamic and can be modulated by context. We examined these influences (...)
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  47. Guy Wallis (2013). Toward a Unified Model of Face and Object Recognition in the Human Visual System. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Our understanding of the mechanisms and neural substrates underlying visual recognition in humans has made considerable progress over the past thirty years. During this period a divide has developed between the fields of object and face recognition. In the psychological literature, in particular, there has been a palpable disconnect between the two fields. This paper follows a trend in part of the face-recognition literature to try to reconcile what we know about these two forms of recognition by considering the (...)
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  48. Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus & Randall O'Reilly (2012). The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. (...)
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  49. Meagan Yee, Susan S. Jones & Linda B. Smith (2012). Changes in Visual Object Recognition Precede the Shape Bias in Early Noun Learning. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Two of the most formidable skills that characterize human beings are language and our prowess in visual object recognition. They may also be developmentally intertwined. Two experiments, a large sample cross-sectional study and a smaller sample 6-month longitudinal study of 18- 24 month olds tested a hypothesized developmental link between changes in the visual object representation and noun learning. Previous findings in visual object recognition indicate that children’s ability to recognize common basic level categories from sparse structural (...)
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  50. Kiwon Yun, Yifan Peng, Dimitris Samaras, Gregory J. Zelinsky & Tamara L. Berg (2013). Exploring the Role of Gaze Behavior and Object Detection in Scene Understanding. Frontiers in Psychology 4:917.score: 18.0
    We posit that a person’s gaze behavior while freely viewing a scene contains an abundance of information, not only about their intent and what they consider to be important in the scene, but also about the scene’s content. Experiments are reported, using two popular image datasets from computer vision, that explore the relationship between the fixations that people make during scene viewing, how they describe the scene, and automatic detection predictions of object categories in the scene. From these exploratory (...)
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