Search results for 'Offer Lieberman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  37
    Itzhak Gilboa, Offer Lieberman & David Schmeidler (2010). On the Definition of Objective Probabilities by Empirical Similarity. Synthese 172 (1):79 - 95.
    We suggest to define objective probabilities by similarity-weighted empirical frequencies, where more similar cases get a higher weight in the computation of frequencies. This formula is justified intuitively and axiomatically, but raises the question, which similarity function should be used? We propose to estimate the similarity function from the data, and thus obtain objective probabilities. We compare this definition to others, and attempt to delineate the scope of situations in which objective probabilities can be used.
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  2. Itzhak Gilboa, Offer Lieberman & David Schmeidler (2009). On the Definition of Objective Probabilities by Empirical Similarity. Synthese 172 (1):79-95.
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  3. Avner Offer (2006). The Challenge of Affluence: Self-Control and Well-Being in the United States and Britain Since 1950. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Since the 1940s Americans and Britons have come to enjoy an era of rising material abundance. Yet this has been accompanied by a range of social and personal disorders, including family breakdown, addiction, mental instability, crime, obesity, inequality, economic insecurity, and declining trust.Avner Offer argues that well-being has lagged behind affluence in these societies, because they present an environment in which consistent choices are difficult to achieve over different time ranges and in which the capacity for personal and social (...)
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  4. Marcel S. Lieberman (1998). Commitment, Value, and Moral Realism. Cambridge University Press.
    Despite the importance of commitment in moral and political philosophy, there has hitherto been little extended analysis of it. Marcel Lieberman examines the conditions under which commitment is possible, and offers at the same time an indirect argument for moral realism. He argues that realist evaluative beliefs are functionally required for commitment - especially regarding its role in self-understanding - and since it is only within a realist framework that such beliefs make sense, realism about values is a condition (...)
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  5. M. S. Lieberman (2000). Commitment, Value, and Moral Realism (PE Devine). Philosophical Books 41 (1):58-59.
    Despite the importance of commitment in moral and political philosophy, there has hitherto been little extended analysis of it. Marcel Lieberman examines the conditions under which commitment is possible, and offers at the same time an indirect argument for moral realism. He argues that realist evaluative beliefs are functionally required for commitment - especially regarding its role in self-understanding - and since it is only within a realist framework that such beliefs make sense, realism about values is a condition (...)
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  6. Marcel S. Lieberman (2011). Commitment, Value, and Moral Realism. Cambridge University Press.
    Despite the importance of commitment in moral and political philosophy, there has hitherto been little extended analysis of it. Marcel Lieberman examines the conditions under which commitment is possible, and offers at the same time an indirect argument for moral realism. He argues that realist evaluative beliefs are functionally required for commitment - especially regarding its role in self-understanding - and since it is only within a realist framework that such beliefs make sense, realism about values is a condition (...)
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  7. Marcel S. Lieberman (2007). Commitment, Value, and Moral Realism. Cambridge University Press.
    Despite the importance of commitment in moral and political philosophy, there has hitherto been little extended analysis of it. Marcel Lieberman examines the conditions under which commitment is possible, and offers at the same time an indirect argument for moral realism. He argues that realist evaluative beliefs are functionally required for commitment - especially regarding its role in self-understanding - and since it is only within a realist framework that such beliefs make sense, realism about values is a condition (...)
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  8. Avner Offer (2007). The Challenge of Affluence: Self-Control and Well-Being in the United States and Britain Since 1950. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Since the 1940s Americans and Britons have come to enjoy an era of rising material abundance. Yet this has been accompanied by a range of social and personal disorders, including family breakdown, addiction, mental instability, crime, obesity, inequality, economic insecurity, and declining trust. Avner Offer argues that well-being has lagged behind affluence in these societies, because they present an environment in which consistent choices are difficult to achieve over different time ranges and in which the capacity for personal and (...)
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  9. Ralph Lieberman (1991). Real Architecture, Imaginary History: The Arsenale Gate as Venetian Mythology. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 54:117-126.
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  10.  6
    Jethro K. Lieberman (1977). The Relativity of Injury. Philosophy and Public Affairs 7 (1):60-73.
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  11.  8
    C. Dewall, R. BaumeisteR & E. Masicampo (2008). Evidence That Logical Reasoning Depends on Conscious Processing. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):628-645.
    Humans, unlike other animals, are equipped with a powerful brain that permits conscious awareness and reflection. A growing trend in psychological science has questioned the benefits of consciousness, however. Testing a hypothesis advanced by [Lieberman, M. D., Gaunt, R., Gilbert, D. T., & Trope, Y. . Reflection and reflexion: A social cognitive neuroscience approach to attributional inference. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 34, 199–249], four studies suggested that the conscious, reflective processing system is vital for logical reasoning. Substantial decrements (...)
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  12.  13
    Vincent J. Vannetelbosch (1999). Alternating-Offer Bargaining and Common Knowledge of Rationality. Theory and Decision 47 (2):111-138.
    This paper reconsiders Rubinstein's alternating-offer bargaining game with complete information. We define rationalizability and trembling- hand rationalizability (THR) for multi-stage games with observed actions. We show that rationalizability does not exclude perpetual disagreement or delay, but that THR implies a unique solution. Moreover, this unique solution is the unique subgame perfect equilibrium (SPE). Also, we reconsider an extension of Rubinstein's game where a smallest money unit is introduced: THR rules out the non-uniqueness of SPE in some particular case. Finally, (...)
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  13.  8
    A. Wertheimer & F. G. Miller (2008). Payment for Research Participation: A Coercive Offer? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):389-392.
    Payment for research participation has raised ethical concerns, especially with respect to its potential for coercion. We argue that characterising payment for research participation as coercive is misguided, because offers of benefit cannot constitute coercion. In this article we analyse the concept of coercion, refute mistaken conceptions of coercion and explain why the offer of payment for research participation is never coercive but in some cases may produce undue inducement.
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  14.  15
    LaRue T. Hosmer (1985). The Other 338: Why a Majority of Our Schools of Business Administration Do Not Offer a Course in Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):17 - 22.
    A recent survey indicated that the majority of schools of business administration do not offer courses in business ethics and/or the social responsibilities of business firms. The author examines the reasons for the omission of these courses, and concludes that faculty in the major disciplines and techniques of management do not recognize the complexity of ethical problems or the importance of ethical decisions in the overall management of large business organizations.
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  15.  52
    Stephen Wright (2013). Does Klein's Infinitism Offer a Response to Agrippa's Trilemma? Synthese 190 (6):1113-1130.
    The regress of reasons threatens an epistemic agent’s right to claim that any beliefs are justified. In response, Peter Klein’s infinitism argues that an infinite series of supporting reasons of the right type not only is not vicious but can make for epistemic justification. In order to resist the sceptic, infinitism needs to provide reason to think that there is at least one justified belief in the world. Under an infinitist conception this involves showing that at least one belief is (...)
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  16.  74
    A. Sidelle (2014). Does Hylomorphism Offer a Distinctive Solution to the Grounding Problem? Analysis 74 (3):397-404.
    The Aristotelian doctrine of hylomorphism has seen a recent resurgence of popularity, due to the work of a number of well-known and impressive philosophers. One of the recently motivating virtues claimed for the doctrine is its ability to solve the grounding problem for philosophers who believe in coinciding entities. In this brief article, I will argue that when fully spelled out, hylomorphism does not, in fact, contribute a distinctive solution to this problem. It is not that it offers no solution (...)
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  17.  1
    Alan Wertheimer & Franklin G. Miller (2008). Payment for Research Participation: A Coercive Offer? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):389-392.
    Payment for research participation has raised ethical concerns, especially with respect to its potential for coercion. We argue that characterising payment for research participation as coercive is misguided, because offers of benefit cannot constitute coercion. In this article we analyse the concept of coercion, refute mistaken conceptions of coercion and explain why the offer of payment for research participation is never coercive but in some cases may produce undue inducement.
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  18.  2
    Rosalind McDougall (2015). The Ethics of Fertility Preservation for Paediatric Cancer Patients: From Offer to Rebuttable Presumption. Bioethics 29 (9):639-645.
    Given advances in the science of fertility preservation and the link between fertility choices and wellbeing, it is time to reframe our ethical thinking around fertility preservation procedures for children and young people with cancer. The current framing of fertility preservation as a possible offer may no longer be universally appropriate. There is an increasingly pressing need to discuss the ethics of failing to preserve fertility, particularly for patient groups for whom established techniques exist. I argue that the starting (...)
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  19.  4
    Nancy L. Segal (1995). Pathways to Sociopathy: Twin Analyses Offer Direction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):574-575.
    Understanding the bases of complex behavioral phenotypes, such as sociopathy, is assisted by an evolutionary approach, in addition to other theoretical perspectives. Unraveling genetic and environmental factors underlying variant forms of sociopathy remains a key challenge for behavioral science investigators. Twin research methods (e.g., longitudinal analyses; twins reared apart) offer informative means of assessing novel hypotheses relevant to sociopathic behaviors.
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  20.  7
    Timothy William Waters (2008). The Blessing of Departure: Acceptable and Unacceptable State Support for Demographic Transformation: The Lieberman Plan to Exchange Populated Territories in Cisjordan. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 2 (1):1-65.
    What limits ought there be on a state’s ability to create a homogeneous society, to increase or perpetuate non-diversity, or to create hierarchies within existing diversity? This article examines those questions with reference to the Lieberman Plan—which proposes to transfer populated territories from Israel to the Palestine in exchange for Jewish settlements on the West Bank— as an abstract exercise in demographic transformation by the state. First the article considers if the Lieberman plan would “work”: Would it create (...)
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  21.  18
    James Rocha (2011). The Sexual Harassment Coercive Offer. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):203-216.
    There is disagreement in the coercion literature over whether an offer, which necessarily lacks a threat, could be coercive, which tends to imply at least some affinity with coercion, which, in paradigm cases, includes a threat. In one difficult sexual harassment case, someone is offered a promotion in exchange for sex, but there is, due to the arrangement of the case, no implied threat or repercussion for refusal. I argue this case counts as coercive since the offer-making attempts (...)
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  22.  10
    David C. Thomasma (1991). Why Philosophers Should Offer Ethics Consultations. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (2).
    Considerable debate has occurred about the proper role of philosophers when offering ethics consultations. Some argue that only physicians or clinical experienced personnel should offer ethics consultations in the clinical setting. Others argue still further that philosophers are ill-equipped to offer such advice, since to do so rests on no social warrant, and violates the abstract and neutral nature of the discipline itself.I argue that philosophers not only can offer such consultations but ought to. To be a (...)
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  23.  2
    Donald R. Franceschetti (2001). Biorobotic Simulations Might Offer Some Advantages Over Purely Computational Ones. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1058-1059.
    A slight modification of Webb's diagrammatic representation of the dimensions for describing models is proposed which extends it to cover a range of theoretical models as well as material models. It is also argued that beyond a certain level robotic simulations could offer a number of real advantages over computer simulations of organisms interacting with their environment.
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  24.  1
    Tarcisio Abreu Saurin (forthcoming). Ethics in Publishing: Complexity Science and Human Factors Offer Insights to Develop a Just Culture. Science and Engineering Ethics.
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  25.  87
    Brian R. Paulson (forthcoming). Book Review: Good News in Exile: Three Pastors Offer a Hopeful Vision for the Church. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (2):223-223.
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  26.  3
    Lilian Miles & S. H. Goo (2013). Corporate Governance in Asian Countries: Has Confucianism Anything to Offer? Business and Society Review 118 (1):23-45.
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  27. Feng Ye (2010). What Anti-Realism in Philosophy of Mathematics Must Offer. Synthese 175 (1):13 - 31.
    This article attempts to motivate a new approach to anti-realism (or nominalism) in the philosophy of mathematics. I will explore the strongest challenges to anti-realism, based on sympathetic interpretations of our intuitions that appear to support realism. I will argue that the current anti-realistic philosophies have not yet met these challenges, and that is why they cannot convince realists. Then, I will introduce a research project for a new, truly naturalistic, and completely scientific approach to philosophy of mathematics. It belongs (...)
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  28.  5
    Gladys White (2014). Gestational Surrogates in Rural India: A Lot to Offer and Even More to Lose. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):40-42.
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  29. Alessandro Minelli (2010). Evolutionary Developmental Biology Does Not Offer a Significant Challenge to the Neo-Darwinian Paradigm. In Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Wiley-Blackwell Pub.
  30.  17
    Stanton Wortham (2011). What Does Philosophy Have to Offer Education, and Who Should Be Offering It? Educational Theory 61 (6):727-741.
    In this review essay Stanton Wortham explores how philosophy of education should both turn inward, engaging with concepts and arguments developed in academic philosophy, and outward, encouraging educational publics to apply philosophical approaches to educational policy and practice. He develops his account with reference to two recent ambitious projects: The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education, edited by Harvey Siegel, and the two-volume yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education (NSSE), titled Why Do We Educate? edited by (...)
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  31. Mason Richey (2008). What Can Philosophers Offer Social Scientists?; or The Frankfurt School and its Relevance to Social Science: From the History of Philosophical Sociology to an Examination of Issues in the Current EU. International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences 3 (6):63-72.
    This paper presents the history of the Frankfurt School’s inclusion of normative concerns in social science research programs during the period 1930-1955. After examining the relevant methodology, I present a model of how such a program could look today. I argue that such an approach is both valuable to contemporary social science programs and overlooked by current philosophers and social scientists.
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  32.  11
    Chris Friel (2015). What Can Piaget Offer Lonergan's Philosophy of Biology? Zygon 50 (3):692-710.
    In Insight, Bernard Lonergan provides, albeit schematically, a unique philosophy of biology which he takes as having “profound differences” with the world view presented by Darwin. These turn on Lonergan's idea of “schemes of recurrence” and of organisms as “solutions to the problem of living in an environment.” His lapidary prose requires some deciphering. I present the broad lines of his philosophy of biology and argue that Jean Piaget's structuralism can shed light on Lonergan's intentions in virtue of his use (...)
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  33.  2
    Edwin L. Hersch (2016). What an Existential Ontology Can Offer Psychotherapists. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (2):107-119.
    In this article, I will try to illustrate some ways in which an existential ontology, based on a phenomenological elaboration of the basic structures or themes of human existence, may prove useful to us in psychotherapeutic theory and practice. A number of philosophers as well as a number of theorists and practitioners of psychotherapy have weighed in on the topic of whether ontology and psychology can or should influence each other and how. In many cases, these discussions have hinged upon (...)
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  34.  55
    Selmer Bringsjord (2007). Offer: One Billion Dollars for a Conscious Robot; If You're Honest, You Must Decline. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):28-43.
    You are offered one billion dollars to 'simply' produce a proof-of-concept robot that has phenomenal consciousness -- in fact, you can receive a deliciously large portion of the money up front, by simply starting a three-year work plan in good faith. Should you take the money and commence? No. I explain why this refusal is in order, now and into the foreseeable future.
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  35.  99
    Edward J. Gracely (1988). Playing Games with Eternity: The Devil's Offer. Analysis 48 (3):113 -.
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  36.  2
    Jack Hadley & James D. Reschovsky (2002). Small Firms' Demand for Health Insurance: The Decision to Offer Insurance. Inquiry 39 (2):118-137.
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  37.  2
    Shawn Winsor & Mita Giacomini (2012). Thinking Outside the Black Box: What Policy Theory Can Offer Healthcare Ethicists. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (11):16-18.
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  38.  5
    G. Thomas Couser (2011). What Disability Studies Has to Offer Medical Education. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (1):21-30.
    Disability studies can be of great value to medical education first, by placing the medical paradigm in the broad context of a sequence of ways of understanding and responding to disability that have emerged in the last two thousand years or so; second, by reminding medical professionals that people with disabilities have suffered as well as profited from medical treatment in the last two hundred years; finally, by providing access to a distinctive point of view from which the experience of (...)
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  39. Jack A. Meyer & Elliot K. Wicks (2001). A Federal Tax Credit to Encourage Employers to Offer Health Coverage. Inquiry 38 (2):202-213.
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  40.  7
    James P. Wind (1990). What Can Religion Offer Bioethics? Hastings Center Report 20 (4):18-20.
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  41.  1
    Leigh E. Rich (forthcoming). For the New, the Former, and All Those Continuing On: We Offer Our Thanks. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
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  42.  4
    Corey Shdaimah (2009). What Does Social Work Have to Offer Evidence-Based Practice? Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (1):18-31.
    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a relatively recent incarnation in social work's long history of valuing evidence as a basis for practice. Few argue with the ethics and usefulness of grounding practice in empirically tested interventions. Critics of EBP instead focus on how it is defined and implemented. Critiques include what counts as evidence, who makes decisions regarding research agendas and processes, and the lack of attention to context. This essay reflects on such critiques and suggests that social work, as a (...)
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  43.  11
    Stan van Hooft (1999). “What Can Philosophy Offer Enterprise?”. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 18 (3/4):113-124.
  44.  8
    Francis V. Corcoran (1926). What the New Scholasticism Has to Offer Modern Thought From the Field of Religion and Theology. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 1:28-34.
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  45.  1
    Bill Livant (2008). I'll Make You an Offer You Can't Refuse. In Bertell Ollman & Tony Smith (eds.), Science and Society. Palgrave Macmillan 373 - 374.
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  46.  16
    Melanie Walker (2003). Framing Social Justice in Education: What Does the 'Capabilities' Approach Offer? British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (2):168 - 187.
    This paper develops a framework for conceptualising social justice in education, drawing particularly on Martha Nussbaum's (2000) capabilities approach. The practical case for consideration is that of widening participation and pedagogical implications in higher (university) education in England. While the paper supports the value and usefulness of Nussbaum's list of ten capabilities for developing a more radical and challenging language and practice for higher education pedagogies, it also argues that her approach is limited. Other ways of conceptualising social justice are (...)
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  47.  2
    Timothy D. Knepper (2009). Ineffability Investigations: What the Later Wittgenstein has to Offer to the Study of Ineffability. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (2):65-76.
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  48.  58
    Bryan Frances, The Offer Paradox.
    This is one of those "fun" examples of a semantic paradox, written for undergraduates.
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  49.  53
    Timothy D. Knepper (2009). Ineffability Investigations: What the Later Wittgenstein has to Offer to the Study of Ineffability. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (2):65 - 76.
    While a considerable amount of effort has been expended in an attempt to understand Ludwig Wittgenstein’s enigmatic comments about silence and the mystical at the end of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus , very little attention has been paid to the implications of Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations for the study of ineffability. This paper first argues that, since Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations problematizes private language, emphasizes the description of actual language use, and recognizes the rule-governed nature of language, it contains significant implications for the study (...)
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  50.  21
    Benjamin W. Libet (1998). Do the Models Offer Testable Proposals of Brain Functions for Conscious Experience? In H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.), Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven
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