Search results for 'Oliver Conolly Bashshar Haydar' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  92
    Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2001). Narrative Art and Moral Knowledge. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (2):109-124.
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  2.  86
    Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2008). Literature, Politics, and Character. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):87-101.
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  3.  40
    Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2003). Aesthetic Principles. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):114-125.
    We give reasons for our judgements of works of art. (2) Reasons are inherently general, and hence dependent on principles. (3) There are no principles of aesthetic evaluation. Each of these three propositions seems plausible, yet one of them must be false. Illusionism denies (1). Particularism denies (2). Generalism denies (3). We argue that illusionism depends on an unacceptable account of the use of critical language. Particularism cannot account for the connection between reasons and verdicts in criticism. Generalism comes in (...)
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  4.  20
    Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2008). The Case Against Faction. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):347-358.
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  5.  17
    Oliver Conolly & Bashshar Haydar (2005). Irreversible Generalism: A Reply to Dickie. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (3):289-295.
    Irreversible generalism, the view that reasons given for the evaluation of art are general and do not admit of exceptions, is defended from the criticisms levelled against it by George Dickie in ‘Reading Sibley’. The authors' view that Frank Sibley adhered to a form of reversible generalism, the view that reasons given for the evaluation of art are general but can sometimes become reasons to disvalue artworks, according to which there a criterion for distinguishing valenced from neutral aesthetic properties, is (...)
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  6. Oliver Conolly & Bashar Haydar (2007). Literature, Knowledge, and Value. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):111-124.
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  7.  46
    Oliver Conolly Bashshar Haydar (2008). The Case Against Faction. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 347-358.
    "Faction" is a hybrid genre, aiming at the factual accuracy of journalism on the one hand and the literary form of the novel on the other. There is a fundamental tension however between those two aims, given the constraints which factual accuracy places on characterization, plot, and thematic exploration characteristic of the novel. Further, faction cannot be defended on the grounds that factual accuracy is a literary value in faction. Finally, some aspects of faction, such as its inability to refer (...)
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  8.  15
    Oliver Conolly Bashshar Haydar (2008). Literature, Politics, and Character. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 87-101.
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  9. Oliver Conolly (2005). Pleasure and Pain in Literature. Philosophy and Literature 29 (2):305-320.
  10.  47
    Bashshar Haydar (2005). Extreme Poverty and Global Responsibility. Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):240-253.
  11.  39
    Bashshar Haydar (2009). Special Responsibility and the Appeal to Cost. Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (2):129-145.
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  12.  73
    Oliver Conolly (2004). Decadent Subjects: The Idea of Decadence in Art, Literature, Philosophy and Culture of the Fin de Siècle in Europe. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):199-202.
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  13.  51
    Bashshar Haydar (2002). Forced Supererogation and Deontological Restrictions. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (4):445-454.
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  14.  34
    Bashshar Haydar (2002). Consequentialism and the Doing-Allowing Distinction. Utilitas 14 (1):96.
    This paper takes a closer look at the incompatibility thesis, namely the claim that consequentialism is incompatible with accepting the moral relevance of the doing-allowing distinction. I examine two attempts to reject the incompatibility thesis, the first by Samuel Scheffler and the second by Frances Kamm. I argue that both attempts fail to provide an adequate ground for rejecting the incompatibility thesis. I then put forward an account of what I take to be at stake in accepting or rejecting the (...)
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  15.  60
    Bashshar Haydar (2010). The Consequences of Rejecting the Moral Relevance of the Doing–Allowing Distinction. Utilitas 22 (2):222-227.
    The claim that one is never morally permitted to engage in non-optimal harm doing enjoys a great intuitive appeal. If in addition to this claim, we reject the moral relevance of the doingallowing distinction. In this short essay, I propose a different take on the argument in question. Instead of opting to reject its conclusion by defending the moral relevance of the doingallowing distinction, we can no longer rely on the strong intuitive appeal of the claim that one is never (...)
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  16.  10
    Bashshar Haydar & Gerhard Øverland (2014). The Normative Implications of Benefiting From Injustice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4):349-362.
    In this article we investigate whether non-culpably benefiting from wrongdoing or injustice generates a moral requirement to disgorge these benefits in order to compensate the victims. We argue that a strong requirement to disgorge such benefits is generated only if other conditions or factors are present. We identify three such factors and claim that their presence would explain why the normative features of certain types of cases of benefiting from wrongdoing differ from cases of benefiting from simple misfortune or bad (...)
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  17.  18
    Bashshar Haydar (2005). The Good, The Bad and The Funny. The Monist 88 (1):121-134.
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  18.  31
    Oliver Conolly (2003). Reports on Philosophy, No. 19, 1999: Reconsidering Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):201-203.
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  19.  28
    Bashshar Haydar (2003). The Moral Relevance of Cost. Philosophical Studies 112 (2):127 - 134.
    Consequentialists do not deny that cost to the agent is a morallyrelevant consideration. For, they do include cost to the agent inthe calculation of the overall good. What they deny, however, isthat cost to the agent is a morally relevant factor independentlyof its impact on the overall good. I argue in this paper that, ifone rejects the claim that cost to the agent is a morallyrelevant factor on its own right, one is then committed toaccepting some `hyper' counter-intuitive moral claims. (...)
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  20.  16
    Bashshar Haydar (2005). The Ethics of Fighting Terror and the Priority of Citizens. Journal of Military Ethics 4 (1):52-59.
    This paper provides a critical commentary on Kasher and Yadlin's article. I start with a few remarks regarding the authors? claim about the uniqueness of fighting terrorism and their proposed definition of acts of terrorism. The main part of my commentary, however, is devoted to discussing Kasher and Yadlin's Principle of Distinction (Part II of their paper). There, I raise several objections to their proposed ranking of state duties and to the way they use the ranking to justify what they (...)
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  21.  5
    Oliver Conolly (1998). Pity, Tragedy and the Pathos of Distance. European Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):277–296.
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  22.  58
    Vojko Strahovnik (2004). The Riddle of Aesthetic Principles. Acta Analytica 19 (33):189-208.
    The problem of aesthetic principles and that of the nature of aesthetic reasons get confronted. If aesthetic reasons play an important role in our aesthetic evaluations and judgments, then both some general aesthetic principles and rules could support them (aesthetic generalism) or again their nature may be particularistic (aesthetic particularism). A recent argument in support of aesthetic generalism as proposed by Oliver Conolly and Bashshar Haydar is presented and criticized for its misapprehension of particularism. Their position (...)
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  23.  1
    Wendell Holmes Oliver (1994). [Book Review] the Essential Holmes, Selections From the Letters, Speeches, Judicial Opinions, and Other Writings of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. [REVIEW] In Peter Singer (ed.), Ethics. Oxford University Press 643-645.
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  24. H. L. Oliver (1950). Oliver, Athenian Commissions of Seventeen. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 44:203.
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  25.  20
    Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2013). Plural Logic. Oxford University Press.
    Alex Oliver and Timothy Smiley provide a new account of plural logic. They argue that there is such a thing as genuinely plural denotation in logic, and expound a framework of ideas that includes the distinction between distributive and collective predicates, the theory of plural descriptions, multivalued functions, and lists.
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  26. Kelly Oliver (2015). Earth and World: Philosophy After the Apollo Missions. Cup.
    Critically engaging the work of Immanuel Kant, Hannah Arendt, Martin Heidegger, and Jacques Derrida together with her own observations on contemporary politics, environmental degradation, and the pursuit of a just and sustainable world, Kelly Oliver lays the groundwork for a politics and ethics that embraces otherness without exploiting difference. Rooted firmly in human beings' relationship to the planet and to each other, Oliver shows peace is possible only if we maintain our ties to earth and world. Oliver (...)
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  27.  3
    Kelly Oliver (1993). Reading Kristeva: Unraveling the Double-Bind. Indiana University Press.
    "... both an excellent introduction and a thoroughgoing analysis of Kristeva’s writing." —Signs "The book is a brilliant combination of a recuperative and a critical reading of Kristeva’s work." —Changes: An International Journal of Psychology & Psychotherapy "... a thorough, detailed, and critical analysis of the writings of Julia Kristeva." —Elizabeth Grosz "... the most involved and engaging study of Julia Kristeva’s work to date..." —The Year’s Work in Critical and Cultural Theory This first full-scale feminist interpretation of Kristeva’s work (...)
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  28. Kelly Oliver (2008). Women: The Secret Weapon of Modern Warfare? Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 1-16.
    The images from wars in the Middle East that haunt us are those of young women killing and torturing. Their media circulated stories share a sense of shock. They have both galvanized and confounded debates over feminism and women's equality. And, as Oliver argues in this essay, they share, perhaps subliminally, the problematic notion of women as both offensive and defensive weapons of war, a notion that is symptomatic of fears of women's "mysterious" powers.
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  29.  3
    Kelly Oliver (2007). Women as Weapons of War: Iraq, Sex, and the Media. Columbia University Press.
    Kelly Oliver reveals how the media and the George W. Bush administration used metaphors of weaponry to describe women and female sexuality and forge a link between vulnerability and violence.
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  30.  20
    Kelly Oliver (1995). Womanizing Nietzsche: Philosophy's Relation to the "Feminine". Routledge.
    In Womanizing Nietzsche, Kelly Oliver uses an analysis of the position of woman in Nietzsche's texts to open onto the larger question of philosophy's relation to the feminine and the maternal. Offering readings from Nietzsche, Derrida, Irigaray, Kristeva, Freud and Lacan, Oliver builds an innovative foundation for an ontology of intersubjective relationships that suggests a new approach to ethics. Oliver argues that while Freud, Nietzsche and Derrida, in particular, attempt to open up philosophy to its other--the unconscious, (...)
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  31.  2
    Kelly Oliver (1997). Family Values: Subjects Between Nature and Culture. Routledge.
    Family Values shows how the various contradictions at the heart of Western conceptions of maternity and paternity problematize our relationships with ourselves and with others. Using philosophical texts, psychoanalytic theory, studies in biology and popular culture, Kelly Oliver challenges our traditional concepts of maternity which are associated with nature, and our conceptions of paternity which are embedded in culture. Oliver's intervention calls into question the traditional image of the oppositional relationship between nature and culture, maternal and paternal. Family (...)
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  32.  2
    Kelly Oliver (ed.) (2002). The Portable Kristeva. Columbia University Press.
    As a linguist, Julia Kristeva has pioneered a revolutionary theory of the sign in its relation to social and political emancipation; as a practicing psychoanalyst, she has produced work on the nature of the human subject and sexuality, and on the "new maladies" of today's neurotic. _The Portable Kristeva_ is the only fully comprehensive compilation of Kristeva's key writings. The second edition includes added material from Kristeva's most important works of the past five years, including _The Sense and Non-Sense of (...)
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  33. Kelly Oliver & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1998). Feminist Interpretations of Friedrich Nietzsche. Penn State University Press.
    Nietzsche has the reputation of being a virulent misogynist, so why are feminists interested in his philosophy? The essays in this volume provide answers to this question from a variety of feminist perspectives. The organization of the volume into two sets of essays, "Nietzsche's Use of Woman" and "Feminists' Use of Nietzsche," reflects the two general approaches taken to the issue of Nietzsche and woman. First, many debates have focused on how to interpret Nietzsche's remarks about women and femininity. Are (...)
     
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  34.  2
    Kelly Oliver (1998). Subjectivity Without Subjects: From Abject Fathers to Desiring Mothers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Subjectivity without Subjects, well-known philosopher and feminist theorist Kelly Oliver looks at aspects of popular culture, film, science, and law to examine contemporary notions of paternity and maternity. Oliver studies the roles of paternal responsibility, virility, and race in such events as the Million Man March and the Promise Keeper's movement and suggests alternative ways to conceive of self-other relations and the subjective identity at stake in them. In addition she offers a detailed analysis of particular works (...)
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  35.  3
    Phil Oliver (2001). William James's "Springs of Delight": The Return to Life. Vanderbilt University Press.
    This enterprising book, written in the spirit of William James, urges our appreciation of the intensely personal character of spiritual transcendence. Phil Oliver's work has important implications for specialists concerned with the Jamesian concept of "pure experience," and it illuminates significant interdisciplinary ties among philosophy, literature, and other intellectual domains.
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  36.  3
    Kelly Oliver (2010). Julia Kristeva's Maternal Passions. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 18 (1):1-8.
    This article critically engages Julia Kristeva’s latest work on maternal passion as an antidote to what she calls “feminine fatigue.” Oliver elaborates, criticizes, and expands Kristeva’s view that maternity can be a model for thinking about passion and its relation to creativity and even to ethics. She relates Kristeva’s thinking about feminine fatigue to contemporary feminism in the United States. .
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  37.  1
    Kelly Oliver (2012). Knock Me Up, Knock Me Down: Images of Pregnancy in Hollywood Films. Columbia University Press.
    Kelly Oliver investigates this curious shift and its reflection of changing attitudes toward women's roles in reproduction and the family. Not all representations signify progress.
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  38.  19
    Simon Oliver (2005). Philosophy, God, and Motion. Routledge.
    In the post-Newtonian world motion is assumed to be a simple category which relates to the locomotion of bodies in space, and is usually associated only with physics. Philosophy, God and Motion shows that this is a relatively recent understanding of motion and that prior to the scientific revolution motion was a much broader and more mysterious category, applying to moral as well as physical movements. Simon Oliver presents fresh interpretations of key figures in the history of western thought (...)
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  39. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2015). Plural Logic. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Alex Oliver and Timothy Smiley provide a new account of plural logic. They argue that there is such a thing as genuinely plural denotation in logic, and expound a framework of ideas that includes the distinction between distributive and collective predicates, the theory of plural descriptions, multivalued functions, and lists.
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  40. Kelly Oliver (2010). Women as Weapons of War: Iraq, Sex, and the Media. Cup.
    Ever since Eve tempted Adam with her apple, women have been regarded as a corrupting and destructive force. The very idea that women can be used as interrogation tools, as evidenced in the infamous Abu Ghraib torture photos, plays on age-old fears of women as sexually threatening weapons, and therefore the literal explosion of women onto the war scene should come as no surprise. From the female soldiers involved in Abu Ghraib to Palestinian women suicide bombers, women and their bodies (...)
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  41. Kelly Oliver (1994). Womanizing Nietzsche: Philosophy's Relation to the "Feminine". Routledge.
    In ____Womanizing Nietzsche,__ Kelly Oliver uses an analysis of the position of woman in Nietzsche's texts to open onto the larger question of philosophy's relation to the feminine and the maternal. Offering readings from Nietzsche, Derrida, Irigaray, Kristeva, Freud and Lacan, Oliver builds an innovative foundation for an ontology of intersubjective relationships that suggests a new approach to ethics.
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  42. Kelly Oliver (2016). Womanizing Nietzsche: Philosophy's Relation to the "Feminine". Routledge.
    In ____Womanizing Nietzsche,__ Kelly Oliver uses an analysis of the position of woman in Nietzsche's texts to open onto the larger question of philosophy's relation to the feminine and the maternal. Offering readings from Nietzsche, Derrida, Irigaray, Kristeva, Freud and Lacan, Oliver builds an innovative foundation for an ontology of intersubjective relationships that suggests a new approach to ethics.
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  43. James Willard Oliver (1960). The Problem of Epistemology. Journal of Philosophy 57 (9):297-304.
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  44. Alex Oliver (1996). The Metaphysics of Properties. Mind 105 (417):1-80.
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  45.  45
    Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's our fault -- The (...)
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  46. W. Donald Oliver (1938). The Logic of Perspective Realism. Journal of Philosophy 35 (8):197-208.
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  47.  67
    Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2004). Multigrade Predicates. Mind 113 (452):609-681.
    The history of the idea of predicate is the history of its emancipation. The lesson of this paper is that there are two more steps to take. The first is to recognize that predicates need not have a fixed degree, the second that they can combine with plural terms. We begin by articulating the notion of a multigrade predicate: one that takes variably many arguments. We counter objections to the very idea posed by Peirce, Dummett's Frege, and Strawson. We show (...)
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  48.  51
    Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2005). Plural Descriptions and Many-Valued Functions. Mind 114 (456):1039-1068.
    Russell had two theories of definite descriptions: one for singular descriptions, another for plural descriptions. We chart its development, in which ‘On Denoting’ plays a part but not the part one might expect, before explaining why it eventually fails. We go on to consider many-valued functions, since they too bring in plural terms—terms such as ‘4’ or the descriptive ‘the inhabitants of London’ which, like plain plural descriptions, stand for more than one thing. Logicians need to take plural reference seriously (...)
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  49. Alex Oliver (1994). Frege and Dummett Are Two. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (174):74-82.
    In "Frege: Philosophy of Mathematics" Dummett recommends the following thesis, (PNP): the correct analysis of any sentence containing a plural noun phrase will show that the phrase is functioning predictively. According to Dummett, (PNP), applied to numerical predications such as the leaves are 1,000' is the key premise in Frege's argument against Mill's theory of numbers. But Frege never subscribed to (PNP) and he rejected such numerical predications, and point out how Frege's own semantic theory for plural noun phrases obscures (...)
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  50. T. J. Smiley, Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.) (2010). The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge.
    Timothy Smiley has made ground-breaking contributions to modal logic, free logic, multiple-conclusion logic, and plural logic; he has illuminated Aristotle’s syllogistic, the ideas of logical form and consequence, and the distinction between assertion and rejection; and his debunking work on the theory of descriptions is a tour de force. In this volume, an international roster of contributors discuss Smiley's work to date; their essays will be of significant interest to those working across the logical spectrum—in philosophy of language, philosophical logic (...)
     
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