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  1. Amélie Lubin, Sandrine Rossi, Gregory Simon, Céline Lanoë, Gaëlle Leroux, Nicolas Poirel, Arlette Pineau & Olivier Houdé (2013). Numerical Transcoding Proficiency in 10-Year-Old Schoolchildren is Associated with Gray Matter Inter-Individual Differences: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Are individual differences in numerical performance sustained by variations in grey matter volume in schoolchildren? To our knowledge, this challenging question for neuroeducation has not yet been investigated in typical development. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry method to search for possible structural brain differences between two groups of 10-year-old schoolchildren (N=22) whose performance differed only in numerical transcoding between analog and symbolic systems. The results indicated that children with low numerical proficiency have less grey matter volume in the parietal (particularly (...)
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  2. Nicolas Poirel, Mathieu Cassotti, Virginie Beaucousin, Arlette Pineau & Olivier Houdé (2012). Pleasant Emotional Induction Broadens the Visual World of Young Children. Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):186-191.
  3. Olivier Houde (2009). Abstract After All? Abstraction Through Inhibition in Children and Adults. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):339 - 340.
    I challenge two points in Cohen Kadosh & Walsh's (CK & W) argument: First, the definition of abstraction is too restricted; second, the distinction between representations and operations is too clear-cut. For example, taking Jean Piaget's I propose that another way to avoid orthodoxy in the field of numerical cognition is to consider inhibition as an alternative idea of abstraction.
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  4. Olivier Houdé (2008). Pedagogy, Not (Only) Anatomy of Reasoning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (5):173-174.
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  5. Olivier Houdé (ed.) (2004). Dictionary of Cognitive Science: Neuroscience, Psychology, Artificial Intelligence, Linguistics, and Philosophy. Psychology Press.
    A translation of the renowned French reference book, Vocabulaire de sciences cognitives , the Dictionary of Cognitive Science presents comprehensive definitions of more than 120 terms. The editor and advisory board of specialists have brought together 60 internationally recognized scholars to give the reader a comprehensive understanding of the most current and dynamic thinking in cognitive science. Topics range from Abduction to Writing, and each entry covers its subject from as many perspectives as possible within the domains of psychology, artificial (...)
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  6. Olivier Houdé & Bernard Mazoyer (2003). The Roots of Cognitive Science: American, Yes, but European Too. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):283-284.
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  7. Olivier Houdé (2002). Consciousness and Unconsciousness of Logical Reasoning Errors in the Human Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):341-341.
    I challenge here the concept of SOC in regard to the question of the consciousness or unconsciousness of logical errors. My commentary offers support for the demonstration of how neuroimaging techniques might be used in the psychology of reasoning to test hypotheses about a potential hierarchy of levels of consciousness (and thus of partial unconsciousness) implemented in different brain networks.
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  8. Sylvain Moutier, Nathalie Angeard & Olivier Houde (2002). Deductive Reasoning and Matching-Bias Inhibition Training: Evidence From a Debiasing Paradigm. Thinking and Reasoning 8 (3):205 – 224.
    Using the matching bias example, the aim of the present studies was to show that adults' reasoning biases are due to faulty executive inhibition programming. In the first study, the subjects were trained on Wason's classical card selection task; half were given training in how to inhibit the perceptual matching bias (experimental group) and half in logic without the inhibition component (control group). On the pre- and post-tests, their performance was assessed on the Evans conditional rule falsification task (with a (...)
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