61 found
Sort by:
  1. Onora O'neill (2013). Who Can Endeavour Peace? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (sup1):41-73.
    (1986). Who Can Endeavour Peace? Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 16, Supplementary Volume 12: Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence and Disarmament, pp. 41-73.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Onora O'Neill (2012). Global Poverty and the Limits of Academic Expertise. Ethics and International Affairs 26 (2):183-189.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Onora O'Neill (2012). Kant and the Social Contract Tradition. In Elisabeth Ellis (ed.), Kant's Political Theory: Interpretations and Applications. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  4. Onora O'Neill (2012). The Jurisprudence Annual Lecture 2012 Making Laws Better or Making Better Laws? Jurisprudence 3 (1):1-12.
    Accounts of good legislative process require a prior understanding of the features that make laws good. Yet many contemporary discussions of ways to improve legislative process say little about the quality of laws. Although it is widely taken as read that laws should not be unjust, too little is said about the importance of their being comprehensible and ascertainable, or about the requirements they set being feasible for those who are to comply. It is unclear whether certain widely discussed ways (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Onora O'Neill (2010). Amartya Sen: The Idea of Justice. Journal of Philosophy 107 (7).
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Onora O'neill (2010). The Idea of Justice. Journal of Philosophy 107 (7):384-388.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Onora O'neill (2009). Applied Ethics: Naturalism, Normativity and Public Policy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (3):219-230.
  8. Onora O'Neill (2009). A Simplified Account of Kant's Ethics. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Onora O'Neill (2009). Ethics for Communication? European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):167-180.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Onora O'Neill (2009). Humanity and Hyper-Regulation : From Nuremberg to Helsinki. In N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen & Jeff McMahan (eds.), Ethics and Humanity: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Glover. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Katrin Flikschuh, Jens Timmermann & Onora O'Neill (2007). Brill Online Books and Journals. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2).
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Onora O'Neill (2007). Experts, Practitioners, and Practical Judgement. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):154-166.
    Kant challenges the well-worn view that practitioners do not need to rely on theory. He acknowledges that experts with a deep knowledge of theory may fail as practitioners both in technical matters, and in matters of morality and justice. However, since action-guiding theories are intended to shape rather than to fit the world, practitioners have no point of reference other than the theories or principles that they seek to enact. If theories of duty appear to offer too little guidance for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Onora O'Neill (2007). Normativity and Practical Judgement. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (3):393-405.
    Norms are apt for reasoning because they have propositional structure and content; they are practical because they aim to guide action, rather than to describe aspects of the world. These two features hold equally of norms construed sociologically as the norms of specific social groups, and of norms conceived abstractly as principles of action. On either view, norms are indeterminate while acts are particular and determinate. Consequently norms cannot fully specify which particular act is to be done. Are they then (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Onora O'Neill (2007). 7 Trust and Autonomy. In Julian Baggini & Jeremy Stangroom (eds.), What More Philosophers Think. Continuum. 66.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Onora O'neill (2004). Consequences for Non-Consequentialists. Utilitas 16 (1):1-11.
    Both consequentialist and non-consequentialist ethical reasoning have difficulties in accounting for the value of consequences. Taken neat, consequentialism is too fierce in its emphasis on success and disregard of luck, while non-consequentialism seemingly over-values inner states and undervalues actual results. In Uneasy Virtue Julia Driver proposes a form of objective consequentialism which claims that characters are good if they typically (but not invariably) produce good results. This position addresses the problems moral luck raises for consequentialism, but requires some form of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Onora O'neill (2004). Kant: Racjonalność jako rozum praktyczny. Przeglad Filozoficzny - Nowa Seria 52 (4):125-145.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Onora O'Neill (2004). Modern Moral Philosophy and the Problem of Relevant Descriptions. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 54:301-316.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Onora O'Neill (2003). Autonomy: The Emperor's New Clothes. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):1–21.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Onora O'neill (2003). 9 Constructivism in Rawls and Kant1. In Samuel Richard Freeman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Rawls. Cambridge University Press. 347.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Onora O'Neill (2003). Constructivism VS. Contractualism. Ratio 16 (4):319–331.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Onora O'Neill (2003). The Inaugural Address: Autonomy: The Emperor's New Clothes. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77:1 - 21.
    Conceptions of individual autonomy and of rational autonomy have played large parts in twentieth century moral philosophy, yet it is hard to see how either could be basic to morality. Kant's conception of autonomy is radically different. He predicated autonomy neither of individual selves nor of processes of choosing, but of principles of action. Principles of action are Kantianly autonomous only if they are law-like in form and could be universal in scope; they are heteronomous if, although law-like in form, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Onora O'Neill (2002). Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Why has autonomy been a leading idea in philosophical writing on bioethics, and why has trust been marginal? In this important book, Onora O'Neill suggests that the conceptions of individual autonomy so widely relied on in bioethics are philosophically and ethically inadequate, and that they undermine rather than support relations of trust. She shows how Kant's non-individualistic view of autonomy provides a stronger basis for an approach to medicine, science and biotechnology, and does not marginalize untrustworthiness, while also explaining why (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Onora O'Neill (2002). Public Health or Clinical Ethics: Thinking Beyond Borders. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):35–45.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Quentin Skinner, Partha Dasgupta, Raymond Geuss, Melissa Lane, Peter Laslett, Onora O'Neill, W. G. Runciman & Andrew Kuper (2002). Political Philosophy: The View From Cambridge. Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (1):1–19.
    This article reports on a conversation convened by Quentin Skinner at the invitation of the Editors of The Journal of Political Philosophy and held in Cambridge on 13 February 2001.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Onora O'Neill (2001). Agents of Justice. Metaphilosophy 32 (1-2):180-195.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Onora O'neill (2001). Practical Principles & Practical Judgment. Hastings Center Report 31 (4):15-23.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Onora O'Neill, Reason and the Resolution of Disputes.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Onora O'Neill (1998). Consistency in Action. In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oup Oxford.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Onora O'Neill (1998). Instituting Principles: Between Duty and Action. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):79-96.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Onora O'Neill (1998). Kant. Kant's Virtues. In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should One Live?: Essays on the Virtues. Clarendon Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Onora O'Neill (1998). Kant on Duties Regarding Nonrational Nature: Onora O'Neill. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):211–228.
    [Allen W. Wood] Kant's moral philosophy is grounded on the dignity of humanity as its sole fundamental value, and involves the claim that human beings are to be regarded as the ultimate end of nature. It might be thought that a theory of this kind would be incapable of grounding any conception of our relation to other living things or to the natural world which would value nonhuman creatures or respect humanity's natural environment. This paper criticizes Kant's argumentative strategy for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Onora O'neill (1997). Environmental Values, Anthropocentrism and Speciesism. Environmental Values 6 (2):127 - 142.
    Ethical reasoning of all types is anthropocentric, in that it is addressed to agents, but anthropocentric starting points vary in the preference they accord the human species. Realist claims about environmental values, utilitarian reasoning and rights-based reasoning all have difficulties in according ethical concern to certain all aspects of natural world. Obligation-based reasoning can provide quite strong if incomplete reasons to protect the natural world, including individual non-human animals. Although it cannot establish all the conclusions to which anti-speciesists aspire, it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Onora O'Neill (1997). Political Liberalism and Public Reason: A Critical Notice of John Rawls, Political Liberalism. Philosophical Review 106 (3):411-428.
  34. Onora O'Neill & Environmental Values (1997). Anthropocentrism and Speciesism'. Environmental Values 6:127-42.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Onora O'Neill (1996). Towards Justice and Virtue: A Constructive Account of Practical Reasoning. Cambridge University Press.
    Towards Justice and Virtue challenges the rivalry between those who advocate only abstract, universal principles of justice and those who commend only the particularities of virtuous lives. Onora O'Neill traces this impasse to defects in underlying conceptions of reasoning about action. She proposes and vindicates a modest account of ethical reasoning and a reasoned way of answering the question 'who counts?', then uses these to construct linked accounts of principles by which we can move towards just institutions and virtuous lives.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Onora O'neill (1994). Practical Reason and Possible Community: A Reply to Jean-Marc Ferry. Ratio Juris 7 (3):308-313.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Onora O'Neill (1993). Duties and Virtues. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 35:107-120.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Onora O'Neill (1992). Charity'. In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. Garland Publishing Inc. 1--135.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. C. A. J. Coady & Onora O'Neill (1990). Messy Morality and the Art of the Possible. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 64:259 - 294.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Onora O'Neill (1989). Constructions of Reason: Explorations of Kant's Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Two centuries after they were published, Kant's ethical writings are as much admired and imitated as they have ever been, yet serious and long-standing accusations of internal incoherence remain unresolved. Onora O'Neill traces the alleged incoherences to attempts to assimilate Kant's ethical writings to modern conceptions of rationality, action and rights. When the temptation to assimilate is resisted, a strikingly different and more cohesive account of reason and morality emerges. Kant offers a "constructivist" vindication of reason and a moral vision (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Onora O'neill (1989). Ethics in Context: Towards the Definition and Differentiation of the Morally Good. Philosophical Books 30 (4):237-238.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Onora O'Neill (1989). Virtuous Lives and Just Societies. Journal of Social Philosophy 20 (1‐2):25-30.
  43. Onora O'Neill (1988). Children's Rights and Children's Lives. Ethics 98 (3):445-463.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Onora O'Neill (1988). Ethical Reasoning and Ideological Pluralism. Ethics 98 (4):705-722.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Onora O'Neill (1988). The Presidential Address: Constructivisms in Ethics. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 89:1 - 17.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Onora O'Neill (1987). Abstraction, Idealization and Ideology in Ethics. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 22:55-69.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Onora O'Neill (1987). Rights to Compensation. Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (01):72-.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Onora O'Neill (1986). Faces of Hunger: An Essay on Poverty, Justice, and Development. G. Allen & Unwin.
  49. Onora O'Neill (1986). The Public Use of Reason. Political Theory 14 (4):523-551.
  50. Onora O'Neill (1986). The Importance of Ownership. Inquiry 29 (1-4):383-386.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 61