Search results for 'Ontological categories' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
See also:
  1. Jan Westerhoff (2004). The Construction of Ontological Categories. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (4):595 – 620.score: 90.0
    I describe an account of ontological categories which does justice to the facts that not all categories are ontological categories and that ontological categories can stand in containment relations. The account sorts objects into different categories in the same way in which grammar sorts expressions . It then identifies the ontological categories with those which play a certain role in the systematization of collections of categories. The paper concludes by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jan Westerhoff (2002). Defining Ontological Categories in an Expansion of Belief Dynamics. Logic and Logical Analysis 10 (3):199-210.score: 90.0
    There have been attempts to get some logic out of belief dynamics, i.e. attempts to define the constants of propositional logic in terms of functions from sets of beliefs to sets of beliefs. It is interesting to see whether something similar can be done for ontological categories, i.e. ontological constants. The theory presented here will be a (modest) expansion of belief dynamics: it will not only incorporate beliefs, but also parts of beliefs, so called belief fragments. On (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jan Westerhoff (2005). Ontological Categories: Their Nature and Significance. Oxford University Press.score: 74.0
    The concept of an ontological category is central to metaphysics. Metaphysicians argue about which category of existence an object should be assigned to, whether one category can be reduced to another one, or whether there might be different equally adequate systems of categorization. Answers to these questions presuppose a clear understanding of what precisely an ontological category is, and Jan Westerhoff now provides the first in-depth analysis. After examining a variety of attempted definitions, he proceeds to argue for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Giovanni Sartor (2009). Legal Concepts as Inferential Nodes and Ontological Categories. Artificial Intelligence and Law 17 (3):217-251.score: 59.0
    I shall compare two views of legal concepts: as nodes in inferential nets and as categories in an ontology (a conceptual architecture). Firstly, I shall introduce the inferential approach, consider its implications, and distinguish the mere possession of an inferentially defined concept from the belief in the concept’s applicability, which also involves the acceptance of the concept’s constitutive inferences. For making this distinction, the inferential and eliminative analysis of legal concepts proposed by Alf Ross will be connected to the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Barbara Heller & Heinrich Herre (2004). Ontological Categories in GOL. Axiomathes 14 (1-3):57-76.score: 57.0
    General Ontological Language (GOL) is a formal framework for representing and building ontologies. The purpose of GOL is to provide a system of top-level ontologies which can be used as a basis for building domain-specific ontologies. The present paper gives an overview about the basic categories of the GOL-ontology. GOL is part of the work of the research group Ontologies in Medicine (Onto-Med) at the University of Leipzig which is based on the collaborative work of the Institute of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jonas R. B. Arenhart (2012). Ontological Frameworks for Scientific Theories. Foundations of Science 17 (4):339-356.score: 54.0
    A close examination of the literature on ontology may strike one with roughly two distinct senses of this word. According to the first of them, which we shall call traditional ontology , ontology is characterized as the a priori study of various “ontological categories”. In a second sense, which may be called naturalized ontology , ontology relies on our best scientific theories and from them it tries to derive the ultimate furniture of the world. From a methodological point (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ingvar Johansson (1989). Ontological Investigations: An Inquiry Into the Categories of Nature, Man, and Society. Routledge.score: 53.0
    ONTOLOGY This book is a book about the world. I am concerned with ontology, not merely with language. Many ontological treatises concentrate largely on the ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Barry Smith & David M. Mark (2001). Geographical Categories: An Ontological Investigation. International Journal of Geographical Information Science 15 (7):591–612.score: 50.0
    This paper reports the results of a series of experiments designed to establish how non-expert subjects conceptualize geospatial phenomena. Subjects were asked to give examples of geographical categories in response to a series of differently phrased elicitations. The results yield an ontology of geographical categories—a catalogue of the prime geospatial concepts and categories shared in common by human subjects independently of their exposure to scientific geography. When combined with nouns such as feature and object, the adjective geographic (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ludger Jansen (2007). Dispositions, Laws, and Categories. Metaphysica 8 (2):211-220.score: 47.0
    After a short sketch of Lowe’s account of his four basic categories, I discuss his theory of formal ontological relations and how Lowe wants to account for dispositional predications. I argue that on the ontic level Lowe is a pan-categoricalist, while he is a language dualist and an exemplification dualist with regard to the dispositional/categorical distinction. I argue that Lowe does not present an adequate account of disposition. From an Aristotelian point of view, Lowe conflates dispositional predication with (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Roderick M. Chisholm (1992). The Basic Ontological Categories. In. In Kevin Mulligan (ed.), Language, Truth and Ontology. Kluwer. 1--13.score: 46.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. E. J. Lowe (1997). Ontological Categories and Natural Kinds. Philosophical Papers 26 (1):29-46.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Sam Cowling (2010). Kantian Humility and Ontological Categories. Analysis 70 (4):659-665.score: 45.0
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Panayot Butchvarov (2007). Ontological Categories: Their Nature and Significance – Jan Westerhoff. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):301–303.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. James D. Madden (2013). On Determining What There Is: The Identity of Ontological Categories in Aquinas, Scotus, and Lowe. By Paul Symington. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):804 - 806.score: 45.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Heine Hansen (2013). On Determining What There Is: The Identity of Ontological Categories in Aquinas, Scotus, and Lowe (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):120-121.score: 45.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Nancy N. Soja, Susan Carey & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1991). Ontological Categories Guide Young Children's Inductions of Word Meaning: Object Terms and Substance Terms. Cognition 38 (2):179-211.score: 45.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nancy N. Soja, Susan Carey & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1993). Ontological Categories Guide Young Children's Inductions of Word Meaning. In Alvin Goldman (ed.), Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: Mit Press.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jan Westerhoff (2002). Defining 'Ontological Category'. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (3):287–293.score: 42.0
    Although a considerable degree of precision has been introduced both into the formulation and the discussion of ontological theories by the use of formal methods there is still a remarkable indefiniteness about foundational issues. In particular it is not clear what an ontological category is and why we regard something as an ontological category. This is amazing given that the notion of ontological category is in fact the most basic of the whole of ontology: it is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Phillip Bricker (2009). Review of The Four-Category Ontology: A Metaphysical Foundation for Natural Science. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):675-678.score: 42.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. R. Brown, J. F. Glazebrook & I. C. Baianu (2007). A Conceptual Construction of Complexity Levels Theory in Spacetime Categorical Ontology: Non-Abelian Algebraic Topology, Many-Valued Logics and Dynamic Systems. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 17 (3-4):409-493.score: 39.0
    A novel conceptual framework is introduced for the Complexity Levels Theory in a Categorical Ontology of Space and Time. This conceptual and formal construction is intended for ontological studies of Emergent Biosystems, Super-complex Dynamics, Evolution and Human Consciousness. A claim is defended concerning the universal representation of an item’s essence in categorical terms. As an essential example, relational structures of living organisms are well represented by applying the important categorical concept of natural transformations to biomolecular reactions and relational structures (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Mohan Matthen (1978). The Categories and Aristotle's Ontology. Dialogue 17 (02):228-243.score: 36.0
    Much recent work on Aristotle's Categories assumes that there is an ontological theory presented in that work and tries to reconstruct it on the basis of the slender evidence in the book. I claim that this is misguided. Using a distinction made by G.E.L. Owen between theory and the "phaenomena", I argue that the Categories is mainly concerned with setting out the phenomena -- the intuitions that any ontology must explain. This thesis has consequences for the interpretation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Daniel Nolan (2011). Categories and Ontological Dependence. The Monist 94 (2):277-301.score: 36.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jorge J. E. Gracia (1999). The Ontological Status of Categories. International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (3):249-264.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Mutsumi Imai & Reiko Mazuka (2003). Re-Evaluating Linguistic Relativity: Language-Specific Categories and the Role of Universal Ontological Knowledge in the Construal of Individuation. In Dedre Getner & Susan Goldin-Meadow (eds.), Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought. Mit Press. 429--464.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Roderick M. Chisholm (1996). A Realistic Theory of Categories: An Essay on Ontology. Cambridge University Press.score: 35.0
    Roderick Chisholm has been for many years one of the most important and influential philosophers contributing to metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and epistemology. This book can be viewed as a summation of his views on an enormous range of topics in metaphysics and epistemology. Yet it is written in the terse, lucid, unpretentious style that has become a hallmark of Chisholm's work. The book is an original treatise designed to defend an original, non-Aristotelian theory of categories. Chisholm argues that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Ronald P. Endicott (2010). Realization, Reductios, and Category Inclusion. Journal of Philosophy 107 (4):213-219.score: 34.0
    Thomas Polger and Laurence Shapiro argue that Carl Gillett's much publicized dimensioned theory of realization is incoherent, being subject to a reductio. Their argument turns on the fact that Gillett's definition of realization makes property instances the exclusive relata of the realization relation, while his belief in multiple realization implies its denial, namely, that properties are the relata of the realization relation on occasions of multiple realization. Others like Sydney Shoemaker have also expressed their view of realization in terms of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Ulrich Reichard (2013). Grammar, Ontology, and the Unity of Meaning. Dissertation, University of Durhamscore: 34.0
    Words have meaning. Sentences also have meaning, but their meaning is different in kind from any collection of the meanings of the words they contain. I discuss two puzzles related to this difference. The first is how the meanings of the parts of a sentence combine to give rise to a unified sentential meaning, as opposed to a mere collection of disparate meanings (UP1). The second is why the formal ontology of linguistic meaning changes when grammatical structure is built up (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Nicolai Hartmann & Keith R. Peterson (2012). How Is Critical Ontology Possible? Toward the Foundation of the General Theory of the Categories, Part One (1923). Axiomathes 22 (3):315-354.score: 31.0
    This is a translation of an early essay by the German philosopher Nicolai Hartmann (1882–1950). In this 1923 essay Hartmann presents many of the fundamental ideas of his new critical ontology. He summarizes some of the main points of his critique of neo-Kantian epistemology, and provides the point of departure for his new approach in an extensive criticism of the errors of the classical ontological tradition. Some of these errors concern the definition of an ontological category or principle, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Barry Smith (1999). Ontology with Human Subjects Testing: An Empirical Investigation of Geographic Categories. American Journal of Economics and Sociology 58 (2):245–272.score: 30.0
    Ontology, since Aristotle, has been conceived as a sort of highly general physics, a science of the types of entities in reality, of the objects, properties, categories and relations which make up the world. At the same time ontology has been for some two thousand years a speculative enterprise. It has rested methodologically on introspection and on the construction and analysis of elaborate world-models and of abstract formal-ontological theories. In the work of Quine and others this ontological (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Barry Smith & Bert R. E. Klagges (2005). Philosophie Und Biomedizinische Forschung. Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 30 (1):5–26.score: 30.0
    Die bahnbrechenden wissenschaftlichen Ergebnisse der letzten Jahre erzwingen eine neue philosophische Auseinandersetzung mit den Grundkategorien der Biologie und der benachbarten Disziplinen. Insbesondere die Anwendung neuer informationstechnischer Mittel in der biomedizinischen Forschung und die damit verbundene, kontinuierlich zunehmende Datenflut sowie die Notwendigkeit, ihrer Herr zu werden, erfordern ein konsequentes Nachdenken darüber, wie biologische Daten systematisiert und klassifiziert werden können. Dafür wiederum bedarf es robuster Theorien von Grundbegriffen wie Art, Spezies, Teil, Ganzes, Funktion, Prozess, Fragment, Sequenz, Expression, Grenze, Locus, Umwelt, System usw. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Catherine Legg & Samuel Sarjant (2012). Bill Gates is Not a Parking Meter: Philosophical Quality Control in Automated Ontology Building. Proceedings of the Symposium on Computational Philosophy, AISB/IACAP World Congress 2012 (Birmingham, England, July 2-6).score: 29.0
    The somewhat old-fashioned concept of philosophical categories is revived and put to work in automated ontology building. We describe a project harvesting knowledge from Wikipedia’s category network in which the principled ontological structure of Cyc was leveraged to furnish an extra layer of accuracy-checking over and above more usual corrections which draw on automated measures of semantic relatedness.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Bob Hale (2011). The Bearable Lightness of Being (Vol 20, Pg 399, 2010). Axiomathes 21 (4):597 - 597.score: 27.0
    How are philosophical questions about what kinds of things there are to be understood and how are they to be answered? This paper defends broadly Fregean answers to these questions. Ontological categories—such as object , property , and relation —are explained in terms of a prior logical categorization of expressions, as singular terms, predicates of varying degree and level, etc. Questions about what kinds of object, property, etc., there are are, on this approach, reduce to questions about truth (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Clark Butler (1976). On the Impossibility of Metaphysics Without Ontology. Metaphilosophy 7 (2):116–132.score: 27.0
    This article defends linguistic descent in contrast to the possibility of linguistic ascent or the formal mode in metaphysics. We can go both ways, but metaphysics metaphysically defined presupposes metaphysics conceptualstically defined, which presupposes metaphysicas ontologially defined. Predicates implie abstract concepts (categories in metaphysics), and abstract oncepts presuppose the concrete qualities from which they are abstracted. A distinction is made between any quality and that which has the quality. This article contains a refutation of Kant on the ontological (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jennifer McWeeny (2012). The Feminist Phenomenology of Excess: Ontological Multiplicity, Auto-Jealousy, and Suicide in Beauvoir's L'Invitée. Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):41-75.score: 27.0
    In this paper, I present a new reading of Simone de Beauvoir’s first major work, L’Invitée ( She Came to Stay ), in order to reveal the text as a vital place of origin for feminist phenomenological philosophy. My reading of L’Invitée departs from most scholarly interpretations of the text in three notable respects: (1) it is inclusive of the “two unpublished chapters” that were excised from the original manuscript at the publisher’s request, (2) it takes seriously Beauvoir’s claim that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Max Kistler (2004). Some Problems for Lowe's Four-Category Ontology. Analysis 64 (2):146–151.score: 27.0
    In E.J. Lowe's ontology, (individual) objects are property-bearers which 1) have identity and 2) are countable. This makes it possible to become or cease to be an object, by beginning or ceasing to fulfil one of these conditions. But the possibility of switching fundamental ontological categories should be excluded. Furthermore, Lowe does not show that “quasi-individuals” (which are not countable) can exist. I argue against Lowe that kinds cannot be property-bearers in a more genuine sense than properties, that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. E. J. Lowe (2012). A Neo-Aristotelian Substance Ontology: Neither Relational nor Constituent. In Tuomas E. Tahko (ed.), Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press. 229-248.score: 27.0
    Following the lead of Gustav Bergmann ( 1967 ), if not his precise terminology, ontologies are sometimes divided into those that are ‘relational’ and those that are ‘constituent’ (Wolterstorff 1970 ). Substance ontologies in the Aristotelian tradition are commonly thought of as being constituent ontologies, because they typically espouse the hylemorphic dualism of Aristotle ’s Metaphysics – a doctrine according to which an individual substance is always a combination of matter and form. But an alternative approach drawing more on the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Uwe Meixner (1998). Actual Existence, Identity and Ontological Priority. Erkenntnis 48 (2-3):209-226.score: 24.0
    The paper first distinguishes ontological priority from epistemological priority and unilateral ontic dependence. Then explications of ontological priority are offered in terms of the reducibility of the actual existence or identity of entities in one ontological category to the actual existence or identity of entities in another. These explications lead to incompatible orders of ontological priority for individuals, properties of individuals and states of affairs. Common to those orders is, however, that the primacy of the category (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Joshua Hoffman (1994). Substance Among Other Categories. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book revives a neglected but important topic in philosophy: the nature of substance. The belief that there are individual substances, for example, material objects and persons, is at the core of our common-sense view of the world yet many metaphysicians deny the very coherence of the concept of substance. The authors develop a novel account of what an individual substance is in terms of independence from other beings. In the process many other important ontological categories are explored: (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Roberto Poli (2010). Spheres of Being and the Network of Ontological Dependencies. Polish Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):171-182.score: 24.0
    Ontological categories form a network of ties of dependence. In this regard, the richest source of distinctions consists in the medieval discussion on the divisions of being. After a preliminary examination of some of those divisions, the paper pays attention to Roman Ingarden’s criteria for classifying the various types of ontological dependence. The following are the main conclusions that can be drawn from this exercise. Ingarden suggests that (1) the most general principles framing the categories of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Peter Simons (1994). New Categories for Formal Ontology. Grazer Philosophische Studien 49:77-99.score: 24.0
    What primitive concepts does formal ontology require? Forsaking as too indirect the linguistic way of discerning the categories of being, this paper considers what primitives might be required for representing things in themselves (noumena) and representations of them in a thoroughly crafted large autonomous multi-purpose database. Leaving logical concepts and material ontology aside, the resulting 32 categories in 13 families range from the obvious (identity/difference, existence/non-existence) through the fairly obvious (part/whole, one/many, sequential order) and the surprisingly familiar (illocutionary (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. David M. Mark, Andre Skupin & Barry Smith (2001). Features, Objects, and Other Things: Ontological Distinctions in the Geographic Domain. In Spatial Information Theory. Foundations of Geographic Information Science. Lecture Notes in Computer Science.score: 23.0
    Two hundred and sixty-three subjects each gave examples for one of five geographic categories: geographic features, geographic objects, geographic concepts, something geographic, and something that could be portrayed on a map. The frequencies of various responses were significantly different, indicating that the basic ontological terms feature, object, etc., are not interchangeable but carry different meanings when combined with adjectives indicating geographic or mappable. For all of the test phrases involving geographic, responses were predominantly natural features such as mountain, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Reinhardt Grossmann (1973). Ontological Reduction. Bloomington,Indiana University Press.score: 23.0
  43. Janusz Kaczmarek (2012). Two Types of Ontological Structure. Concepts Structures and Lattices of Elementary Situations. Logic and Logical Philosophy 21 (2):165-174.score: 23.0
    In 1982, Wolniewicz proposed a formal ontology of situations based on the lattice of elementary situations (cf. [7, 8]). In [3], I constructed some types of formal structure Porphyrian Tree Structures (PTS), Concepts Structures (CS) and the Structures of Individuals (U) that formally represent ontologically fundamental categories: species and genera (PTS), concepts (CS) and individual beings (U) (cf. [3, 4]). From an ontological perspective, situations and concepts belong to different categories. But, unexpectedly, as I shall show, some (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Sahotra Sarkar (1992). Models of Reduction and Categories of Reductionism. Synthese 91 (3):167-94.score: 21.0
    A classification of models of reduction into three categories — theory reductionism, explanatory reductionism, and constitutive reductionism — is presented. It is shown that this classification helps clarify the relations between various explications of reduction that have been offered in the past, especially if a distinction is maintained between the various epistemological and ontological issues that arise. A relatively new model of explanatory reduction, one that emphasizes that reduction is the explanation of a whole in terms of its (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Phil Corkum (forthcoming). Substance and Independence in Aristotle. In B. Schnieder, A. Steinberg & M. Hoeltje (eds.), Ontological Dependence, Supervenience, and Response-Dependence. Basic Philosophical Concepts Series, Philosophia Verlag.score: 21.0
    Individual substances are the ground of Aristotle’s ontology. Taking a liberal approach to existence, Aristotle accepts among existents entities in such categories other than substance as quality, quantity and relation; and, within each category, individuals and universals. As I will argue, individual substances are ontologically independent from all these other entities, while all other entities are ontologically dependent on individual substances. The association of substance with independence has a long history and several contemporary metaphysicians have pursued the connection. In (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jung H. Lee (1998). Problems of Religious Pluralism: A Zen Critique of John Hick's Ontological Monomorphism. Philosophy East and West 48 (3):453-477.score: 21.0
    John Hick's "pluralistic hypothesis" of religion essays a comprehensive vision of religious diversity and its attendant soteriological, epistemological, and ontological implications. At the heart of Hick's proposal is the belief in the transcendental unity and soteriological identity of all religions. While coherent and compelling, Hick's model militates against those traditions that do not possess an ultimate noumenal referent that undergirds the phenomenal responses of culturally conditioned traditions. One of those traditions, namely Sōtō Zen Buddhism, at once defies Hick's (...) and presses for an alternative understanding of the epistemological, metaphysical, and soteriological issues. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Anand Kumar & Barry Smith, The Ontology of Blood Pressure: A Case Study in Creating Ontological Partitions in Biomedicine. IFOMIS Reports.score: 21.0
    We provide a methodology for the creation of ontological partitions in biomedicine and we test the methodology via an application to the phenomenon of blood pressure. An ontology of blood pressure must do justice to the complex networks of intersecting pathways in the organism by which blood pressure is regulated. To this end it must deal not only with the anatomical structures and physiological processes involved in such regulation but also with the relations between these at different levels of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Matthieu Fontaine & Shahid Rahman (2014). Towards a Semantics for the Artifactual Theory of Fiction and Beyond. Synthese 191 (3):499-516.score: 21.0
    In her book Fiction and Metaphysics (1999) Amie Thomasson, influenced by the work of Roman Ingarden, develops a phenomenological approach to fictional entities in order to explain how non-fictional entities can be referred to intrafictionally and transfictionally, for example in the context of literary interpretation. As our starting point we take Thomasson’s realist theory of literary fictional objects, according to which such objects actually exist, albeit as abstract and artifactual entities. Thomasson’s approach relies heavily on the notion of ontological (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Robert L. Ashenhurst (1996). Ontological Aspects of Information Modeling. Minds and Machines 6 (3):287-394.score: 21.0
    Information modeling (also known as conceptual modeling or semantic data modeling) may be characterized as the formulation of a model in which information aspects of objective and subjective reality are presented (the application), independent of datasets and processes by which they may be realized (the system).A methodology for information modeling should incorporate a number of concepts which have appeared in the literature, but should also be formulated in terms of constructs which are understandable to and expressible by the system user (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000