Search results for 'Optics History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    A. Zimmerman (2001). Looking Beyond History: The Optics of German Anthropology and the Critique of Humanism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):385-411.
    Late nineteenth-century German anthropology had to compete for intellectual legitimacy with the established academic humanities (Geisteswissenschaften), above all history. Whereas humanists interpreted literary documents to create narratives about great civilizations, anthropologists represented and viewed objects, such as skulls or artifacts, to create what they regarded as natural scientific knowledge about so-called 'natural peoples'-colonized societies of Africa, the Pacific, and the Americas. Anthropologists thus invoked a venerable tradition that presented looking at objects as a more certain source of knowledge than (...)
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  2.  7
    Olivier Darrigol (2012). A History of Optics From Greek Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century. OUP Oxford.
    This book is a long-term history of optics, from early Greek theories of vision to the nineteenth-century victory of the wave theory of light. It is a clear and richly illustrated synthesis of a large amount of literature, and a reliable and efficient guide for anyone who wishes to enter this domain.
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  3.  13
    A. C. Cr̀ombie (1991). Expectation, Modelling and Assent in the History of Optics—II. Kepler and Descartes. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (1):89-115.
  4.  18
    A. C. Crombie (1990). Expectation, Modelling and Assent in the History of Optics: Part I. Alhazen and the Medieval Tradition. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (4):605-632.
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  5.  1
    G. N. Cantor (1978). The History of'Georgian'Optics. History of Science 16:1-21.
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  6. Allister Crombie (1991). C,«The Mechanistic Hypothesis and the Scientific Study of Vision: Some Optical Ideas as a Background of the Invention of the Microscope» in Historical Aspects of Microscopy, Éds. S. Bradbury & G. l'E. Turner, Cambridge, 1967.-«Expectation, Modelling and Assent in the History of Optics, II: Kepler and Descartes». [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 22 (1).
     
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  7.  0
    Robert Smith (2010). The Adaptive Optics Revolution: A History. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 101:673-674.
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  8.  0
    James Weisheipl (1985). Studies in the History of Medieval Optics by David C. Lindberg. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 76:268-270.
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  9.  1
    Gábor Á Zemplén (2014). A History of Optics From Greek Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (4):450-453.
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  10.  1
    Igal Galili & Amnon Hazan (2001). The Effect of a History-Based Course in Optics on Students' Views About Science. Science and Education 10 (1-2):7-32.
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  11.  0
    Klaus Hentschel (2012). A History of Optics From Greek Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century. Annals of Science 71 (4):1-2.
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    Alan Shapiro (2013). A History Of Optics: From Greek Antiquity To The Nineteenth Century. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 104:383-384.
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  13.  54
    Katherine H. Tachau (1988). Vision and Certitude in the Age of Ockham: Optics, Epistemology, and the Foundations of Semantics, 1250-1345. E.J. Brill.
    When William of Ockham lectured on Lombard's "Sentences" in 1317-1319, he articulated a new theory of knowledge.
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  14.  9
    Dominique Raynaud (2003). Ibn Al-Haytham on Binocular Vision: A Precursor of Physiological Optics. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):79-99.
    The modern physiological optics introduces the notions related to the conditions of fusion of binocular images by the concept of correspondence, due to Christiaan Huygens (1704), and by an experiment attributed to Christoph Scheiner (1619). The conceptualization of this experiment dates, in fact, back to Ptolemy (90-168) and Ibn al-Haytham (d. after 1040). The present paper surveys Ibn al-Haytham's knowledge about the mechanisms of binocular vision. The article subsequently explains why Ibn al-Haytham, a mathematician, but here an experimenter, did (...)
  15. Jeffrey McDonough (forthcoming). Descartes' Dioptrics and Descartes' Optics. In Nolan Larry (ed.), The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon. Cambridge
    Descartes’ work on optics spanned his entire career and represents a fascinating area of inquiry from both the perspectives of the history of science and his systematic natural philosophy. The first of these entries offers a brief account of Descartes' seminal work in optics, the Dioptrique, often translated as the Optics or, more literally, as the Dioptrics. The second entry overview of Descartes’ understanding of light, his derivations of the two central laws of geometrical optics, (...)
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  16.  17
    A. Mark Smith (2006). Seeing and Being Seen in the Later Medieval World: Optics, Theology, and Religious Life (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):473-474.
    A. Mark Smith - Seeing and Being Seen in the Later Medieval World: Optics, Theology, and Religious Life - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.3 473-474 Dallas G. Denery, II. Seeing and Being Seen in the Later Medieval World: Optics, Theology, and Religious Life. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought , 63. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. x + 202. Cloth, $75.00. Among the metaphors we (...)
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  17.  16
    J. Worrall (2000). The Scope, Limits, and Distinctiveness of the Method of 'Deduction From the Phenomena': Some Lessons From Newton's 'Demonstrations' in Optics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):45-80.
    Having been neglected or maligned for most of this century, Newton's method of 'deduction from the phenomena' has recently attracted renewed attention and support. John Norton, for example, has argued that this method has been applied with notable success in a variety of cases in the history of physics and that this explains why the massive underdetermination of theory by evidence, seemingly entailed by hypothetico-deductive methods, is invisible to working physicists. This paper, through a detailed analysis of Newton's (...)
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  18.  25
    Margaret D. Garber (2005). Chymical Wonders of Light: J. Marcus Marci's Seventeenth-Century Bohemian Optics. Early Science and Medicine 10 (4):478-509.
    In 1648, J. Marcus Marci of Prague anticipated two chief features of Isaac Newton's celebrated 1672 theory of light and color, namely that colors are inherent to light and that the role of the prism is to separate the rays of color by means of refraction. Furthermore, Marci argued that colors produced by a first refraction are immutable when subjected to refraction by a second prism. This paper argues that the key to Marci's achievement derived from his chymical view of (...)
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  19.  11
    Elaheh Kheirandish (2009). Footprints of "Experiment" in Early Arabic Optics. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):79-104.
    This study traces the early developments of the concept of experiment with a view of extending the subject in both content and approach. It extends the content of the subject slightly backward, prior to the methodological breakthroughs of the Optics of Ibn al-Haytham , which are credited as a "significant landmark in the history of experimental science." And it extends the approach to the subject slightly forward, from the premise that early science was "largely carried out in books," (...)
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  20.  2
    Fokko Jan Dijksterhuis (2004). Once Snell Breaks Down: From Geometrical to Physical Optics in the Seventeenth Century. Annals of Science 61 (2):165-185.
    Snell's law of refraction did not affect the study of optics until twenty‐five years after its publication in 1637 and by then its universality threatened to break down already. Two optical phenomena—colour dispersion and strange refraction—were discovered that did not conform to the sine law. In the early 1670s, Isaac Newton and Christiaan Huygens respectively investigated these phenomena. They tried to describe the irregular behaviour of light rays mathematically and to reconcile it with ordinary refraction. This paper discusses their (...)
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  21.  20
    Dominique Raynaud (2003). Ibn al-Haytham sur la vision binoculaire: un précurseur de l'optique physiologique. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):79-99.
    L'optique physiologique moderne introduit les notions relatives aux conditions de fusion des images binoculaires par le concept de correspondance, prêté à Christiaan Huygens (1704), et par une expérience attribuée à Christoph Scheiner (1619). L'article montre que la conceptualisation de l'expérience remonte en fait à Ptolémée (90-168) et à Ibn al-Haytham (m. ap. 1040), et précise les connaissances que ce dernier avait des mécanismes de la vision binoculaire. Il est ensuite expliqué pourquoi Ibn al-Haytham, mathématicien mais ici expérimentateur, ne donne pas (...)
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  22.  15
    A. Malet (2001). The Power of Images: Mathematics and Metaphysics in Hobbes's Optics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (2):303-333.
    This paper deals with Hobbes's theory of optical images, developed in his optical magnum opus, 'A Minute or First Draught of the Optiques' (1646), and published in abridged version in De homine (1658). The paper suggests that Hobbes's theory of vision and images serves him to ground his philosophy of man on his philosophy of body. Furthermore, since this part of Hobbes's work on optics is the most thoroughly geometrical, it reveals a good deal about the role of mathematics (...)
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  23.  4
    G. N. Cantor (1977). Berkeley, Reid, and the Mathematization of Mid-Eighteenth-Century Optics. Journal of the History of Ideas 38 (3):429.
    Berkeley's "new theory of vision" and, In particular, His sensationalist solution to the problem of judging distance and magnitude were discussed by many eighteenth-Century authors who faced a variety of problem situations. More specifically, Berkeley's theory fed into the debate over whether the phenomena of vision were susceptible to mathematical analysis or were experientially determined. In this paper a variety of responses to berkeley are examined, Concluding with thomas reid's attempt to distinguish physical optics (which can be analyzed geometrically) (...)
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  24.  3
    Donald Kunze (1988). Delirious History and Optical Mnemonics in Vico and Camillo. Semiotics:436-446.
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  25. Donald Kunze (forthcoming). The Cone of Vision: Delirious History and Optical Mnemonics in Vico and Camillo. Semiotics.
     
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  26.  0
    Friedrich Steinle (2002). Science and His Habilitation in History and Philosophy of Science. He is the Author of Numerous Articles and a Book, Newton's Manuskript 'De Graviatione'(Stuttgart 1991), on Newton's Mechanical and Optical Con-Cepts. In More Recent Work, Including His Forthcoming Book Explorative Experimente: Ampère, Faraday Und Die Urpünge der Elektrodynamik (Stuttgart. [REVIEW] Perspectives on Science 10 (4).
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  27. J. H. van‘T. Hoff (2001). A Proposal for Extending the Currently Employed Structural Formulae in Chemistry Into Space, Together With a Related Remark on the Relationship Between Optical Activating Power and Chemical Constitution of Organic Compounds.; a Paper on the History of the First Publication of the Pamphlet in Dutch is by PJ Ramberg and GJ Somsen. Annals of Science 58:51.
     
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  28. Olival Freire (2006). Philosophy Enters the Optics Laboratory: Bell's Theorem and its First Experimental Tests (1965–1982). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (4):577-616.
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  29.  21
    Ofer Gal & Raz Chen-Morris (2010). Baroque Optics and the Disappearance of the Observer: From Kepler's Optics to Descartes' Doubt. Journal of the History of Ideas 71 (2):191-217.
  30.  9
    Antoni Malet (1997). Isaac Barrow on the Mathematization of Nature: Theological Voluntarism and the Rise of Geometrical Optics. Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (2):265-287.
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  31.  21
    Raz Chen-Morris (2005). Shadows of Instruction: Optics and Classical Authorities in Kepler's Somnium. Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (2):223-243.
  32.  14
    Paul Busch & Pekka J. Lahti (1996). The Standard Model of Quantum Measurement Theory: History and Applications. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 26 (7):875-893.
    The standard model of the quantum theory of measurement is based on an interaction Hamiltonian in which the observable to be measured is multiplied by some observable of a probe system. This simple Ansatz has proved extremely fruitful in the development of the foundations of quantum mechanics. While the ensuing type of models has often been argued to be rather artificial, recent advances in quantum optics have demonstrated their principal and practical feasibility. A brief historical review of the standard (...)
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  33.  18
    Alan E. Shapiro (1974). Light, Pressure, and Rectilinear Propagation: Descartes' Celestial Optics and Newton's Hydrostatics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 5 (3):239-296.
  34.  0
    A. Smith (1981). Getting the Big Picture in Perspectivist Optics. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 72:568-589.
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  35.  15
    Colin Howson (ed.) (1976). Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences: The Critical Background to Modern Science, 1800-1905. Cambridge University Press.
    Lakatos, I. History of science and its rational reconstructions.--Clark, P. Atomism vs. thermodynamics.--Worrall, J. Thomas Young and the "rufutation" of Newtonian optics.--Musgrave, A. Why did oxygen supplant phlogiston?--Zahar, E. Why did Einstein's programme supersede Lorentz's?--Frické, M. The rejection of Avogadro's hypotheses.--Feyerabend, P. On the critique of scientific reason.
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  36.  7
    A. I. Sabra (1966). Ibn Al-Haytham's Criticisms of Ptolemy's Optics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 4 (2):145-149.
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  37.  2
    Richard S. Westfall (1968). The Science of Optics in the Seventeenth Century. History of Science 6:150.
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  38. Geoffrey N. Cantor (1990). Physical Optics. In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge 627--638.
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  39.  16
    Margaret J. Osler (1971). John Pecham and the Science of Optics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (4):510-510.
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  40.  3
    Stuart Peterfreund (1994). Scientific Models in Optics: From Metaphor to Metonymy and Back. Journal of the History of Ideas 55:59-73.
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  41.  2
    O. Gal (1996). Producing Knowledge in the Workshop: Hooke's 'Inflection' From Optics to Planetary Motion. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (2):181-205.
  42.  5
    Stanislaus J. Sherman Dundon (1981). The Development of Newtonian Optics in England. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (1):116-118.
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  43. F. Abeles (1964). Instrumental Optics. History of Science. R. Taton. New York, Basic Books 3:144-154.
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  44.  0
    Geoffrey Cantor (1996). Optics in the Age of Euler: Conceptions of the Nature of Light, 1700–1795. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 29 (2):236-238.
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  45.  0
    I. Cohen (1941). The Photismi de Lumine of Maurolycus. A Chapter in Late Medieval Optics by Henry Crew. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 33:251-253.
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  46.  0
    R. W. Home (1985). Optics After Newton: Theories of Light in Britain and Ireland 1704-1840 by G. N. Cantor, and Brewster and Wheatstone on Vision, Ed. By Nicholas J. Wade. [REVIEW] History of Science 23:207-211.
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  47.  0
    Nahum Kipnis (2007). Discovery in Science and in Teaching Science. Science and Education 16 (9-10):883-920.
    A proper presentation of scientific discoveries may allow science teachers to eliminate certain myths about the nature of science, which originate from an uncertainty among scholars about what constitutes a discovery. It is shown that a disagreement on this matter originates from a confusion of the act of discovery with response to it. It is suggested to separate these two concepts and also to distinguish the ‘scientific’ response from the ‘social’ one. The analysis is based on historical examples, primarily from (...)
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  48.  0
    Murray Krieger (1985). Optics and Aesthetic Perception: A Rebuttal. Critical Inquiry 11 (3):502.
    I am troubled by the temper of E. H. Gombrich’s response, “Representation and Misrepresentation” , to my “Ambiguities of Representation and Illusion: An E. H. Gombrich Retrospective” and by his preferring not to sense the profound admiration—indeed, the homage—intended by my essay, both for his contributions to recent theory and for their influence upon its recent developments. But I am more troubled by the confusions his remarks may cause in the interpretation of his own work as well as in the (...)
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  49.  0
    J. D. North (1971). John Pecham and the Science of Optics. Perspectiva Communis. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 5 (4):415-416.
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  50. Roshdi Rashed (1989). Problems of the Transmission of Greek Scientific Thought Into Arabic: Examples From Mathematics and Optics. History of Science 27 (76):199-209.
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