Search results for 'Optics History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. Zimmerman (2001). Looking Beyond History: The Optics of German Anthropology and the Critique of Humanism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):385-411.score: 150.0
    Late nineteenth-century German anthropology had to compete for intellectual legitimacy with the established academic humanities (Geisteswissenschaften), above all history. Whereas humanists interpreted literary documents to create narratives about great civilizations, anthropologists represented and viewed objects, such as skulls or artifacts, to create what they regarded as natural scientific knowledge about so-called 'natural peoples'-colonized societies of Africa, the Pacific, and the Americas. Anthropologists thus invoked a venerable tradition that presented looking at objects as a more certain source of knowledge than (...)
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  2. Olivier Darrigol (2012). A History of Optics From Greek Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century. OUP Oxford.score: 144.0
    This book is a long-term history of optics, from early Greek theories of vision to the nineteenth-century victory of the wave theory of light. It shows how light gradually became the central entity of a domain of physics that no longer referred to the functioning of the eye; it retraces the subsequent competition between medium-based and corpuscular concepts of light; and it details the nineteenth-century flourishing of mechanical ether theories. The author critically exploits and sometimes completes the more (...)
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  3. A. C. Crombie (1990). Expectation, Modelling and Assent in the History of Optics: Part I. Alhazen and the Medieval Tradition. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (4):605-632.score: 126.0
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  4. A. C. Cr̀ombie (1991). Expectation, Modelling and Assent in the History of Optics—II. Kepler and Descartes. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (1):89-115.score: 126.0
  5. G. N. Cantor (1978). The History of'Georgian'Optics. History of Science 16:1-21.score: 126.0
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  6. Allister Crombie (1991). C,«The Mechanistic Hypothesis and the Scientific Study of Vision: Some Optical Ideas as a Background of the Invention of the Microscope» in Historical Aspects of Microscopy, Éds. S. Bradbury & G. l'E. Turner, Cambridge, 1967.-«Expectation, Modelling and Assent in the History of Optics, II: Kepler and Descartes». [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 22 (1).score: 126.0
     
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  7. Igal Galili & Amnon Hazan (2001). The Effect of a History-Based Course in Optics on Students' Views About Science. Science and Education 10 (1-2):7-32.score: 120.0
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  8. Klaus Hentschel (2012). A History of Optics From Greek Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century. Annals of Science:1-2.score: 120.0
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  9. Gábor Á Zemplén (2014). A History of Optics From Greek Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (4):450-453.score: 120.0
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  10. Katherine H. Tachau (1988). Vision and Certitude in the Age of Ockham: Optics, Epistemology, and the Foundations of Semantics, 1250-1345. E.J. Brill.score: 90.0
    When William of Ockham lectured on Lombard's "Sentences" in 1317-1319, he articulated a new theory of knowledge.
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  11. Jeffrey McDonough (forthcoming). Descartes' Dioptrics and Descartes' Optics. In Nolan Larry (ed.), The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon. Cambridge.score: 66.0
    Descartes’ work on optics spanned his entire career and represents a fascinating area of inquiry from both the perspectives of the history of science and his systematic natural philosophy. The first of these entries offers a brief account of Descartes' seminal work in optics, the Dioptrique, often translated as the Optics or, more literally, as the Dioptrics. The second entry overview of Descartes’ understanding of light, his derivations of the two central laws of geometrical optics, (...)
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  12. J. Worrall (2000). The Scope, Limits, and Distinctiveness of the Method of 'Deduction From the Phenomena': Some Lessons From Newton's 'Demonstrations' in Optics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):45-80.score: 54.0
    Having been neglected or maligned for most of this century, Newton's method of 'deduction from the phenomena' has recently attracted renewed attention and support. John Norton, for example, has argued that this method has been applied with notable success in a variety of cases in the history of physics and that this explains why the massive underdetermination of theory by evidence, seemingly entailed by hypothetico-deductive methods, is invisible to working physicists. This paper, through a detailed analysis of Newton's (...)
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  13. A. Malet (2001). The Power of Images: Mathematics and Metaphysics in Hobbes's Optics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (2):303-333.score: 42.0
    This paper deals with Hobbes's theory of optical images, developed in his optical magnum opus, 'A Minute or First Draught of the Optiques' (1646), and published in abridged version in De homine (1658). The paper suggests that Hobbes's theory of vision and images serves him to ground his philosophy of man on his philosophy of body. Furthermore, since this part of Hobbes's work on optics is the most thoroughly geometrical, it reveals a good deal about the role of mathematics (...)
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  14. G. N. Cantor (1977). Berkeley, Reid, and the Mathematization of Mid-Eighteenth-Century Optics. Journal of the History of Ideas 38.score: 42.0
    Berkeley's "new theory of vision" and, In particular, His sensationalist solution to the problem of judging distance and magnitude were discussed by many eighteenth-Century authors who faced a variety of problem situations. More specifically, Berkeley's theory fed into the debate over whether the phenomena of vision were susceptible to mathematical analysis or were experientially determined. In this paper a variety of responses to berkeley are examined, Concluding with thomas reid's attempt to distinguish physical optics (which can be analyzed geometrically) (...)
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  15. Donald Kunze (1988). Delirious History and Optical Mnemonics in Vico and Camillo. Semiotics:436-446.score: 40.0
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  16. Donald Kunze (forthcoming). The Cone of Vision: Delirious History and Optical Mnemonics in Vico and Camillo. Semiotics.score: 40.0
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  17. Friedrich Steinle (2002). Science and His Habilitation in History and Philosophy of Science. He is the Author of Numerous Articles and a Book, Newton's Manuskript 'De Graviatione'(Stuttgart 1991), on Newton's Mechanical and Optical Con-Cepts. In More Recent Work, Including His Forthcoming Book Explorative Experimente: Ampère, Faraday Und Die Urpünge der Elektrodynamik (Stuttgart. [REVIEW] Perspectives on Science 10 (4).score: 40.0
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  18. J. H. van‘T. Hoff (2001). A Proposal for Extending the Currently Employed Structural Formulae in Chemistry Into Space, Together With a Related Remark on the Relationship Between Optical Activating Power and Chemical Constitution of Organic Compounds.; a Paper on the History of the First Publication of the Pamphlet in Dutch is by PJ Ramberg and GJ Somsen. Annals of Science 58:51.score: 40.0
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  19. Olival Freire (2006). Philosophy Enters the Optics Laboratory: Bell's Theorem and its First Experimental Tests (1965–1982). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (4):577-616.score: 36.0
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  20. Hermann von Helmholtz (1995). Science and Culture: Popular and Philosophical Essays. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    Hermann von Helmholtz was a leading figure of nineteenth-century European intellectual life, remarkable even among the many scientists of the period for the range and depth of his interests. A pioneer of physiology and physics, he was also deeply concerned with the implications of science for philosophy and culture. From the 1850s to the 1890s, Helmholtz delivered more than two dozen popular lectures, seeking to educate the public and to enlighten the leaders of European society and governments about the potential (...)
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  21. A. Mark Smith (2006). Seeing and Being Seen in the Later Medieval World: Optics, Theology, and Religious Life (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):473-474.score: 36.0
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  22. Raz Chen-Morris (2005). Shadows of Instruction: Optics and Classical Authorities in Kepler's Somnium. Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (2):223-243.score: 36.0
  23. Alan E. Shapiro (1974). Light, Pressure, and Rectilinear Propagation: Descartes' Celestial Optics and Newton's Hydrostatics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 5 (3):239-296.score: 36.0
  24. Ofer Gal & Raz Chen-Morris (2010). Baroque Optics and the Disappearance of the Observer: From Kepler's Optics to Descartes' Doubt. Journal of the History of Ideas 71 (2):191-217.score: 36.0
  25. Colin Howson (ed.) (1976). Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences: The Critical Background to Modern Science, 1800-1905. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Lakatos, I. History of science and its rational reconstructions.--Clark, P. Atomism vs. thermodynamics.--Worrall, J. Thomas Young and the "rufutation" of Newtonian optics.--Musgrave, A. Why did oxygen supplant phlogiston?--Zahar, E. Why did Einstein's programme supersede Lorentz's?--Frické, M. The rejection of Avogadro's hypotheses.--Feyerabend, P. On the critique of scientific reason.
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  26. Paul Busch & Pekka J. Lahti (1996). The Standard Model of Quantum Measurement Theory: History and Applications. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 26 (7):875-893.score: 36.0
    The standard model of the quantum theory of measurement is based on an interaction Hamiltonian in which the observable to be measured is multiplied by some observable of a probe system. This simple Ansatz has proved extremely fruitful in the development of the foundations of quantum mechanics. While the ensuing type of models has often been argued to be rather artificial, recent advances in quantum optics have demonstrated their principal and practical feasibility. A brief historical review of the standard (...)
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  27. Margaret J. Osler (1971). John Pecham and the Science of Optics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (4):510-510.score: 36.0
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  28. Antoni Malet (1997). Isaac Barrow on the Mathematization of Nature: Theological Voluntarism and the Rise of Geometrical Optics. Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (2):265-287.score: 36.0
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  29. Stanislaus J. Sherman Dundon (1981). The Development of Newtonian Optics in England. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (1):116-118.score: 36.0
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  30. O. Gal (1996). Producing Knowledge in the Workshop: Hooke's 'Inflection' From Optics to Planetary Motion. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (2):181-205.score: 36.0
  31. Stuart Peterfreund (forthcoming). Scientific Models in Optics: From Metaphor to Metonymy and Back. Journal of the History of Ideas.score: 36.0
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  32. A. I. Sabra (1966). Ibn Al-Haytham's Criticisms of Ptolemy's Optics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 4 (2):145-149.score: 36.0
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  33. F. Abeles (1964). Instrumental Optics. History of Science. R. Taton. New York, Basic Books 3:144-154.score: 36.0
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  34. Geoffrey N. Cantor (1990). Physical Optics. In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. 627--638.score: 36.0
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  35. R. W. Home (1985). Optics After Newton: Theories of Light in Britain and Ireland 1704-1840 by G. N. Cantor, and Brewster and Wheatstone on Vision, Ed. By Nicholas J. Wade. [REVIEW] History of Science 23:207-211.score: 36.0
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  36. Roshdi Rashed (1989). Problems of the Transmission of Greek Scientific Thought Into Arabic: Examples From Mathematics and Optics. History of Science 27 (76):199-209.score: 36.0
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  37. Rienk Vermij (2012). Instruments and the Making of a Philosopher. Spinoza's Career in Optics. Intellectual History Review 23 (1):65-81.score: 36.0
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  38. Richard S. Westfall (1968). The Science of Optics in the Seventeenth Century. History of Science 6:150.score: 36.0
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  39. Reimund Torge (1998). Der Bau des physikalischen Instituts der Universität Breslau und seine Entwicklung unter Otto Lummer. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 6 (1):174-174.score: 30.0
    After a short introduction into the history of the building of the Physics Institute of the University of Breslau, the development under Otto Lummer is sketched: influenced by the newly founded Technische Hochschule, the building as well as the faculty, were enlarged. The collection of instruments for instruction and research was built up and the cooperation with industry and with guests from abroad strengthened. Young scientists were promoted, making Lummer’s institute into one of the leading ones in optics (...)
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  40. Pauline Kleingeld (1999). Kant, History, and the Idea of Moral Development. History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (1):59-80.score: 27.0
    I examine the consistency of Kant's notion of moral progress as found in his philosophy of history. To many commentators, Kant's very idea of moral development has seemed inconsistent with basic tenets of his critical philosophy. This idea has seemed incompatible with his claims that the moral law is unconditionally and universally valid, that moral agency is noumenal and atemporal, and that all humans are equally free. Against these charges, I argue not only that Kant's notion of moral development (...)
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  41. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 27.0
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and original arguments (...)
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  42. Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Biological Conception of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):1-28.score: 27.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that Kant's philosophy of biology has crucial implications for our understanding of his philosophy of history, and that overlooking these implications leads to a fundamental misconstruction of his views. More precisely, I will show that Kant's philosophy of history is modelled on his philosophy of biology due to the fact that the development of the human species shares a number of peculiar features with the functioning of organisms, these features entailing (...)
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  43. Joseph Margolis (2011). Toward a Theory of Human History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):245-273.score: 27.0
    I show the sense in which the concept of history as a human science affects our theory of the natural sciences and, therefore, our theory of the unity of the physical and human sciences. The argument proceeds by way of reviewing the effect of the Darwinian contribution regarding teleologism and of post-Darwinian paleonanthropology on the transformation of the primate members of Homo sapiens into societies of historied selves. The strategy provides a novel way of recovering the unity of the (...)
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  44. Noel Carroll (2012). History and the Philosophy of Art. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):370-382.score: 27.0
    Abstract In this essay I trace the role of history in the philosophy of art from the early twentieth century to the present, beginning with the rejection of history by formalists like Clive Bell. I then attempt to show how the arguments of people like Morris Weitz and Arthur Danto led to a re-appreciation of history by philosophers of art such as Richard Wollheim, Jerrold Levinson, Robert Stecker and others.
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  45. Carl Hammer (2008). Explication, Explanation, and History. History and Theory 47 (2):183–199.score: 27.0
    To date, no satisfactory account of the connection between natural-scientific and historical explanation has been given, and philosophers seem to have largely given up on the problem. This paper is an attempt to resolve this old issue and to sort out and clarify some areas of historical explanation by developing and applying a method that will be called “pragmatic explication” involving the construction of definitions that are justified on pragmatic grounds. Explanations in general can be divided into “dynamic” and “static” (...)
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  46. David Carr (2009). Experience, Temporality and History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (4):335-354.score: 27.0
    Philosophers' reflections on history have been dominated for decades by two themes: representation and memory. On both of these accounts, historical inquiry is divided by a certain gap from what it seeks to find or wants to know, and its activity is seen by philosophers as that of bridging this gap. Against this background, the concept of experience, in spite of its apparent rootedness in the present, can be revived as a means of thinking about our connection to the (...)
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  47. Jeff Malpas (2011). Truth, Narrative, and the Materiality of Memory: An Externalist Approach in the Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):328-353.score: 27.0
    One of the most influential and significant developments in the philosophy of language over the last thirty years has been the rise of externalist conceptions of content. This essay aims to explore the implications of a form of externalism, largely derived from the work of Donald Davidson, for thinking about history, and in so doing to suggest one way in which contemporary philosophy of language may engage with contemporary philosophy of history. Much of the discussion focuses on the (...)
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  48. Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2010). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. History & Theory 48 (1):21-37.score: 27.0
    Contemporary caution against anachronism in intellectual history, and the currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity in the philosophy of mind, are two prevailing conditions that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. The former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that are alien to the historical intellectual setting under study, and combined with the latter suggests caution in relying on our intuitions regarding subjectivity due to the historically contingent characterizations it has attained in (...)
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  49. Stephen Gaukroger (2012). What Does History Matter to the History of Philosophy? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):406-424.score: 27.0
    Abstract Contrary to most modern interpretations, in the early modern period, history was an indispensable resource for many philosophers. The different uses of history by Bacon, Gassendi, Locke, and Hume are explored to establish the role of history as a resource in early-modern philosophy.
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  50. Anthony Burns (2011). Conceptual History and the Philosophy of the Later Wittgenstein: A Critique of Quentin Skinners Contextualist Method. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):54-83.score: 27.0
    Although first published in 1969, the methodological views advanced in Quentin Skinner's “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas” remain relevant today. In his article Skinner suggests that it would be inappropriate to even attempt to write the history of any idea or concept. In support of this view, Skinner advances two arguments, one derived from the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein and the other from that of J. L. Austin. In this paper I focus on the (...)
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