Search results for 'Ordo-responsibility : conceptual reflections towards A. semantic innovation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ordo-responsibility : conceptual reflections towards A. semantic innovation (2008). Founding Business Ethics and (Corporate) Social Responsibility. Adela Cortina / Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics; Karl Homann / Profit and Morality in Global Responsibility; Markus Beckmann and Ingo Pies. In Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.), Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company.score: 16710.0
     
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  2. Thomas Hanke & Wolfgang Stark (2009). Strategy Development: Conceptual Framework on Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):507 - 516.score: 795.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its action-oriented offspring Corporate Citizenship (CC) currently trigger an intensifying debate on ethics, role and behavior of companies within civil society. For companies, CSR raises the question of what may be the "good reason(s)" for acting responsible towards its members, customers or society. In order to answer this question, we face the debate on CSR and its strategic engagement drivers on the levels of corporate culture, social innovation, and civil society. In this article, (...)
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  3. Josefa Toribio (2002). Semantic Responsibility. Philosophical Explorations 1 (1):39-58.score: 480.0
    In this paper I attempt to develop a notion of responsibility (semantic responsibility) that is to the notion of belief what epistemic responsibility is to the notion of justification. 'Being semantically responsible' is shown to involve the fulfilment of cognitive duties which allow the agent to engage in the kind of reason-laden discourses which render her beliefs appropriately sensitive to correction. The concept of semantic responsibility suggests that the notion of belief found in contemporary philosophical debates about content (...)
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  4. Andreas R. Köhler (2013). Material Scarcity: A Reason for Responsibility in Technology Development and Product Design. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1165-1179.score: 456.0
    There are warning signs for impending scarcity of certain technology metals that play a critical role in high-tech products. The scarce elements are indispensable for the design of modern technologies with superior performance. Material scarcity can restrain future innovations and presents therefore a serious risk that must be counteracted. However, the risk is often underrated in the pursuit of technological progress. Many innovators seem to be inattentive to the limitations in availability of critical resources and the possible implications thereof. The (...)
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  5. Asle H. Kiran (2012). Responsible Design. A Conceptual Look at Interdependent Design–Use Dynamics. Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):179-198.score: 351.3
    This article investigates the conceptual foundations of technological innovation and development projects that aim to bring ethical and social issues into the design stage. Focusing on the ethics and social impact of technological innovation and development has been somewhat of a trend lately, for instance in ELSA research and in such initiatives as the Dutch Responsible Innovation programme. I argue that in order to succeed in doing social responsible and ethical sound design, a proper understanding of (...)
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  6. Ioanna Boulouta & Christos N. Pitelis (2013). Who Needs CSR? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on National Competitiveness. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (3):1-16.score: 348.0
    The link between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and competitiveness has been examined mainly at the business level. The purpose of this paper is to improve conceptual understanding and provide empirical evidence on the link between CSR and competitiveness at the national level. We draw on an eclectic-synthetic framework of international economics, strategic management and CSR literatures to explore conceptually whether and how CSR can impact on the competitiveness of nations, and test our hypotheses empirically with a sample of 19 (...)
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  7. Michael Davis & Kelly Laas (2013). “Broader Impacts” or “Responsible Research and Innovation”? A Comparison of Two Criteria for Funding Research in Science and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-21.score: 324.8
    Our subject is how the experience of Americans with a certain funding criterion, “broader impacts” (and some similar criteria) may help in efforts to turn the European concept of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) into a useful guide to funding Europe’s scientific and technical research. We believe this comparison may also be as enlightening for Americans concerned with revising research policy. We have organized our report around René Von Schomberg’s definition of RRI, since it seems both to cover what (...)
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  8. Tineke A. Abma, Vivianne E. Baur, Bert Molewijk & Guy A. M. Widdershoven (2010). Inter-Ethics: Towards an Interactive and Interdependent Bioethics. Bioethics 24 (5):242-255.score: 288.0
    Since its origin bioethics has been a specialized, academic discipline, focussing on moral issues, using a vast set of globalized principles and rational techniques to evaluate and guide healthcare practices. With the emergence of a plural society, the loss of faith in experts and authorities and the decline of overarching grand narratives and shared moralities, a new approach to bioethics is needed. This approach implies a shift from an external critique of practices towards embedded ethics and interactive practice improvement, (...)
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  9. Minna Halme & Juha Laurila (2009). Philanthropy, Integration or Innovation? Exploring the Financial and Societal Outcomes of Different Types of Corporate Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):325 - 339.score: 280.0
    This article argues that previous research on the outcomes of corporate responsibility should be refined in two ways. First, although there is abundant research that addresses the link between corporate responsibility (CR) and financial performance, hardly any studies scrutinize whether the type of corporate responsibility makes a difference to this link. Second, while the majority of CR research conducted within business studies concentrates on the financial outcomes for the firm, the societal outcomes of CR are left largely unexplored. To tackle (...)
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  10. Joyce Koe Hwee Nga & Gomathi Shamuganathan (2010). The Influence of Personality Traits and Demographic Factors on Social Entrepreneurship Start Up Intentions. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):259 - 282.score: 279.0
    The sheer impact of the recent global financial turmoil and scandals (such as Enron and WorldCom) has demonstrated that unbridled commercial entrepreneurs who are allowed to pursue their short-term opportunities regardless of the consequences has led to a massive depreciation of the wealth of nations, social livelihood and environmental degradation. This article suggests that the time has come for entrepreneurs to adopt a more integrative view of business that blends economic, social and environmental values. Social entrepreneurs present such a proposition (...)
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  11. Jos Lehmann & Aldo Gangemi (2007). An Ontology of Physical Causation as a Basis for Assessing Causation in Fact and Attributing Legal Responsibility. Artificial Intelligence and Law 15 (3):301-321.score: 279.0
    Computational machineries dedicated to the attribution of legal responsibility should be based on (or, make use of) a stack of definitions relating the notion of legal responsibility to a number of suitably chosen causal notions. This paper presents a general analysis of legal responsibility and of causation in fact based on Hart and Honoré’s work. Some physical aspects of causation in fact are then treated within the “lite” version of DOLCE foundational ontology written in OWL-DL, a standard description logic for (...)
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  12. Marcus Wagner (2010). Corporate Social Performance and Innovation with High Social Benefits: A Quantitative Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):581 - 594.score: 279.0
    This article analyses the link between innovation with high social benefits and corporate social performance (CSP) and the role that family firms play in this. This theme is particularly relevant given the large number of firms that are family-owned. Also the implicit potential of innovation to reconcile corporate sustainability aspects with profitability justifies an extended analysis of this link. Governments often support socially beneficial innovation with various policy instruments, with the intention of increasing international competitiveness and simultaneously (...)
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  13. Heidi von Weltzien Heivik & Deepthi Shankar (2011). How Can SMEs in a Cluster Respond to Global Demands for Corporate Responsibility? Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):175 - 195.score: 279.0
    This article argues why and how a participatory approach to implement corporate social responsibility (CSR) in a cluster would be beneficial for small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) who are members of the NCE -Subsea cluster in Bergen, Norway. The political and strategic reasons as well as internal motivation for SMEs to incorporate CSR into their business strategies are discussed with support from relevant literature. Furthermore, we offer a discussion on the characteristics of different approaches to incorporating CSR as part of business (...)
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  14. Heledd Jenkins (2009). A 'Business Opportunity' Model of Corporate Social Responsibility for Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises. Business Ethics 18 (1):21-36.score: 261.0
    In their book 'Corporate Social Opportunity', Grayson and Hodges maintain that 'the driver for business success is entrepreneurialism, a competitive instinct and a willingness to look for innovation from non-traditional areas such as those increasingly found within the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda'. Such opportunities are described as 'commercially viable activities which also advance environmental and social sustainability'. There are three dimensions to corporate social opportunity (CSO) – innovation in products and services, serving unserved markets and building new (...)
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  15. Matthew Haigh & James Hazelton (2004). Financial Markets: A Tool for Social Responsibility? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):59-71.score: 237.0
    Objectives of socially responsible investment (SRI) are discussed with reference to the two main mechanisms of the SRI ‘movement’: shareholder advocacy and managed investments. We argue that in their current forms, both mechanisms lack the power to create significant corporate change. Shareholder advocacy has been largely unsuccessful to date. Even if resolutions were successful, shareholder advocacy may still be ineffective if underlying economic opportunities remain. Marketing material and investment prospectuses issued by socially responsible mutual funds (SRI funds) commonly contain the (...)
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  16. Daan Schuurbiers (2011). What Happens in the Lab: Applying Midstream Modulation to Enhance Critical Reflection in the Laboratory. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):769-788.score: 236.0
    In response to widespread policy prescriptions for responsible innovation, social scientists and engineering ethicists, among others, have sought to engage natural scientists and engineers at the ‘midstream’: building interdisciplinary collaborations to integrate social and ethical considerations with research and development processes. Two ‘laboratory engagement studies’ have explored how applying the framework of midstream modulation could enhance the reflections of natural scientists on the socio-ethical context of their work. The results of these interdisciplinary collaborations confirm the utility of midstream (...)
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  17. Neelke Doorn (2010). A Procedural Approach to Distributing Responsibilities in R&D Networks. Poiesis and Praxis 7 (3):169-188.score: 228.0
    In professional settings, people often have diverse and competing conceptions of responsibility and of when it is fair to hold someone responsible. This may lead to undesirable gaps in the distribution of responsibilities. In this paper, a procedural model is developed for alleviating the tension between diverging responsibility conceptions. The model is based on the Rawlsian approach of wide reflective equilibrium and overlapping consensus. The model is applied to a technological project, which concerned the development of an in-house monitoring system (...)
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  18. Marylyn Carrigan, Caroline Moraes & Sheena Leek (2011). Fostering Responsible Communities: A Community Social Marketing Approach to Sustainable Living. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (3):515 - 534.score: 228.0
    Just as socially irresponsible organizational behavior leaves a punitive legacy on society, socially responsible organizations can foster curative change. This article examines whether small organizations can foster societal change toward more sustainable modes of living. We contend that consumption is deeply intertwined with social relations and norms, thus making individual behavioral change toward sustainability a matter of facilitating change in individual behavior, as well as in social norms and relations between organizations and consumers. We argue that it is in this (...)
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  19. Lino Paula & Frans Birrer (2006). Including Public Perspectives in Industrial Biotechnology and the Biobased Economy. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (3):253-267.score: 219.0
    Industrial (“white”) biotechnology promises to contribute to a more sustainable future. Compared to current production processes, cases have been identified where industrial biotechnology can decrease the amount of energy and raw materials used to make products and also reduce the amount of emissions and waste produced during production. However, switching from products based on chemical production processes and fossil fuels towards “biobased” products is at present not necessarily economically viable. This is especially true for bulk products, for example ethanol (...)
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  20. Sanford Shieh (2009). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Frege on Definitions. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):885-888.score: 216.0
    Three clusters of philosophically significant issues arise from Frege's discussions of definitions. First, Frege criticizes the definitions of mathematicians of his day, especially those of Weierstrass and Hilbert. Second, central to Frege's philosophical discussion and technical execution of logicism is the so-called Hume's Principle, considered in The Foundations of Arithmetic . Some varieties of neo-Fregean logicism are based on taking this principle as a contextual definition of the operator 'the number of …', and criticisms of such neo-Fregean programs sometimes appeal (...)
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  21. Jean Porter (2000). Responsibility, Passion, and Sin: A Reassessment of Abelard's Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):367 - 394.score: 216.0
    This article reassesses Peter Abelard's account of moral intention, or, better, consent, in light of recent work on his own thought and on the twelfth-century background of that thought. The author argues (1) that Abelard's focus on consent as the determining factor for morality does not rule out, but, on the contrary, presupposes objective criteria for moral judgment and (2) that Abelard's real innovation does not lie in his doctrine of consent as the sole source of merit or guilt, (...)
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  22. Vincent Colapietro (2009). Acknowledgment, Responsibility, and Innovation. Tradition and Discovery 36 (1):38-41.score: 213.8
    This response affirms the content of the previous two articles but is focused on highlighting some features of Polanyi’s and Langer’s philosophies they do not emphasize. The rise of knowledge and trajectory of meaning Polanyi and Langer describe may be seen as incorporating a complex, innovative process of acknowledgment – of tradition, social norms, previous experience, and personal commitments of which one may not even be aware – for which one is responsible.
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  23. Frank G. A. Bakker & Iina Hellsten (2013). Capturing Online Presence: Hyperlinks and Semantic Networks in Activist Group Websites on Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):807-823.score: 207.0
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  24. José A. Puppim De Oliveira (2008). Social Upgrading Among Small Enterprises and Clusters in Developing Countries. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:125-136.score: 204.0
    Many clusters of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Less Developed Countries (LDC) are counteracting the “race to the bottom” by becoming competitive while at the same time “socially upgrading” in order to successfully improve their innovation capacity, social, environmental and labor standards, and health-and-safety issues. There is significant literature on the competitiveness of clusters and SMEs, but little research about how and why competitive small firms in LDCs are socially upgrading. Issues such as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and (...)
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  25. Michael R. Nelson (2010). A Response to Responsibility of and Trust in ISPs by Raphael Cohen-Almagor. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):403-407.score: 198.0
    The Internet and Internet applications such as cloud computing continue to grow at an extraordinary rate, enabled by the Internet's open architecture and the vibrant lightly regulated Internet service provider (ISP) market. Proposals to hold ISPs responsible for content and software shared by their customers would dramatically constrain the openness and innovation that has been the hallmark of the Internet to date. Rather than taking the kind of approach favored by Raphael Cohen-Almagor, government should enlist the assistance of other (...)
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  26. Waymond Rodgers, Hiu Lam Choy & Andrés Guiral (2013). Do Investors Value a Firm's Commitment to Social Activities? Journal of Business Ethics 114 (4):607-623.score: 198.0
    Previous empirical research has found mixed results for the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) investments on corporate financial performance (CFP). This paper contributes to the literature by exploring in a two stage investor decision-making model the relationship between a firm’s innovation effort, CSR, and financial performance. We simultaneously examine the impact of CSR on both accounting-based (financial health) and market-based (Tobin’s Q) financial performance measures. From a sample of top corporate citizens, we find that: (1) a firm’s social (...)
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  27. Clement Greenberg (1999). Homemade Esthetics: Observations on Art and Taste. Oxford University Press.score: 195.0
    Thanks to his unsurpassed eye and his fearless willingness to take a stand, Clement Greenberg (1909 1994) became one of the giants of 20th century art criticism a writer who set the terms of critical discourse from the moment he burst onto the scene with his seminal essays Avant Garde and Kitsch (1939) and Towards a Newer Laocoon (1940). In this work, which gathers previously uncollected essays and a series of seminars delivered at Bennington in 1971, Greenberg provides his (...)
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  28. Merel A. Visse, Truus Teunissen, Albert Peters, Guy A. M. Widdershoven & Tineke A. Abma (2010). Dialogue for Air, Air for Dialogue: Towards Shared Responsibilities in COPD Practice. Health Care Analysis 18 (4):358-373.score: 195.0
    For the past several years patients have been expected to play a key role in their recovery. Self management and disease management have reached a hype status. Considering these recent trends what does this mean for the division of responsibilities between doctors and patients? What kind of role should healthcare providers play? With findings based on a qualitative research project of an innovative practice for people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) we reflect on these questions. In-depth interviews conducted with (...)
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  29. Max Louwerse & Sterling Hutchinson (2012). Neurological Evidence Linguistic Processes Precede Perceptual Simulation in Conceptual Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 161.3
    There is increasing evidence from response time experiments that language statistics and perceptual simulations both play a role in conceptual processing. In an EEG experiment we compared neural activity in cortical regions commonly associated with linguistic processing and visual perceptual processing to determine to what extent symbolic and embodied accounts of cognition applied. Participants were asked to determine the semantic relationship of word pairs (e.g., sky – ground) or to determine their iconic relationship (i.e., if the presentation of (...)
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  30. Sterling Hutchinson Max Louwerse (2012). Neurological Evidence Linguistic Processes Precede Perceptual Simulation in Conceptual Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 161.3
    There is increasing evidence from response time experiments that language statistics and perceptual simulations both play a role in conceptual processing. In an EEG experiment we compared neural activity in cortical regions commonly associated with linguistic processing and visual perceptual processing to determine to what extent symbolic and embodied accounts of cognition applied. Participants were asked to determine the semantic relationship of word pairs (e.g., sky – ground) or to determine their iconic relationship (i.e., if the presentation of (...)
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  31. Thorsten Busch (2011). Capabilities in, Capabilities Out: Overcoming Digital Divides by Promoting Corporate Citizenship and Fair ICT. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (4):339-353.score: 160.0
    This conceptual article discusses strategies of corporations in the information and communication technologies (ICT) sector and their role in the conflict over access to knowledge in the digital environment. Its main hypothesis is that ICT corporations are very capable actors when it comes to bridging digital divides in both developed and developing countries—maybe even the most capable actors. Therefore, it is argued that ICT corporations could use their capabilities to help citizens gain sustainable access to knowledge in order to (...)
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  32. Dennis M. Patten (2002). Give or Take on the Internet: An Examinationof the Disclosure Practices of Insurance Firm Web Innovators. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):247 - 259.score: 158.0
    Theories of corporate social responsibility suggest that there ought to be a balance between what business takes from society and what it gives back in return. Recently, the practice literature within the insurance industry has been heavily pushing for the development of the Internet as a tool for commerce while virtually ignoring the role it could play in terms of information disclosure to stakeholders. This study examines whether insurance firms themselves reflect this emphasis, or whether companies that are industry leaders (...)
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  33. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 156.3
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  34. Elysa Koppelman & John F. Halpin, Toward a Model of Self-Regulation.score: 149.0
    In recent years, there has been much discussion over how to assure scientific integrity. It has become clear that a few scientists have fraudulently collected or reported data, conducted harmful or unethical experiments, or practiced “unscientific” procedure. What are regulative bodies to do? The approach has been to define research misconduct and then use that definition to assess scientific practice.[1] But just how to define research misconduct and hence, regulate the conduct of scientists in research? The debate that resulted in (...)
     
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  35. Stephen Wilmot (2001). Corporate Moral Responsibility: What Can We Infer From Our Understanding of Organisations? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (2):161 - 169.score: 146.3
    The question of corporate moral responsibility – whether corporate bodies can be held morally responsible for their actions – has been debated by a number of writers since the 1970s. This discussion is intended to add to that debate, and focuses for that purpose on our understanding of the organisation. Though the integrity of the organisation has been called into question by the postmodern view of organisations, that view does not necessarily rule out the attribution of corporate agency, any more (...)
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  36. Davide Grossi, Lambèr Royakkers & Frank Dignum (2007). Organizational Structure and Responsibility. Artificial Intelligence and Law 15 (3):223-249.score: 146.3
    Aim of the present paper is to provide a formal characterization of various different notions of responsibility within groups of agents (Who did that? Who gets the blame? Who is accountable for that? etc.). To pursue this aim, the papers proposes an organic analysis of organized collective agency by tackling the issues of organizational structure, role enactment, organizational activities, task-division and task-allocation. The result consists in a semantic framework based on dynamic logic in which all these concepts can be (...)
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  37. Laura W. Ekstrom (ed.) (2001). Agency and Responsibility: Essays on the Metaphysics of Freedom. Westview.score: 144.0
    A companion volume to Free Will: A Philosophical Study , this new anthology collects influential essays on free will, including both well-known contemporary classics and exciting recent work. Agency and Responsibility: Essays on the Metaphysics of Freedom is divided into three parts. The essays in the first section address metaphysical issues concerning free will and causal determinism. The second section groups papers presenting a positive account of the nature of free action, including competing compatibilist and incompatibilist analyses. The third section (...)
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  38. Gerard I. J. M. Zwetsloot (2003). From Management Systems to Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2-3):201 - 207.score: 144.0
    At the start of the 21st century, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) seems to have great potential for innovating business practices with a positive impact on People, Planet and Profit. In this article the differences between the management systems approach of the nineties, and Corporate Social Responsibility are analysed.An analysis is structured around three business principles that are relevant for CSR and management systems: (1) doing things right the first time, (2) doing the right things, and (3) continuous improvement and (...). Basically CSR is focussing on the second principle, and management systems focus on the first. However, CSR is very likely to build on the management systems as well. (shrink)
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  39. Henry Jackman (2001). Semantic Pragmatism and A Priori Knowledge. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):455 - 480.score: 144.0
    Hillary Putnam has famously argued that we can know that we are not brains in a vat because the hypothesis that we are is self-refuting. While Putnam's argument has generated interest primarily as a novel response to skepticism, his original use of the brain in a vat scenario was meant to illustrate a point about the "mind/world relationship." In particular, he intended it to be part of an argument against the coherence of metaphysical realism, and thus to be part of (...)
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  40. Rider W. Foley, Ira Bennett & Jameson M. Wetmore (2012). Practitioners' Views on Responsibility: Applying Nanoethics. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 6 (3):231-241.score: 144.0
    Significant efforts have been made to define ethical responsibilities for professionals engaged in nanotechnology innovation. Rosalyn Berne delineated three ethical dimensions of nanotechnological innovation: non-negotiable concerns, negotiable socio-cultural claims, and tacitly ingrained norms. Braden Allenby demarcated three levels of responsibility: the individual, professional societies (e.g. engineering codes), and the macro-ethical. This article will explore how these definitions of responsibility map onto practitioners’ understanding of their responsibilities and the responsibilities of others using the nanotechnology innovation community of the (...)
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  41. Edouard Machery (2012). Semantic Epistemology: A Brief Response to Devitt. Theoria 27 (2):223-227.score: 141.0
    In this article, I argue that philosophers’ intuitions about reference are not more reliable than lay people’s and that intuitions about the reference of proper names and uses of proper names provide equally good evidence for theories of reference.
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  42. Andrew Ward (1988). A "Semantic Realist" Response to Dummett's Antirealism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (3):553-555.score: 138.8
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  43. Sylvia Maxfield (2008). Reconciling Corporate Citizenship and Competitive Strategy: Insights From Economic Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):367 - 377.score: 138.0
    Neoclassical and Austrian/evolutionary economic paradigms have different implications for integrating corporate social responsibility (corporate citizenship) and competitive strategy. porter's "Five Forces" model implicitly rests on neoclassical theory of the firm and is not easily reconciled with corporate social responsibility. Resource-based models of competitive strategy do not explicitly embrace a particular economic paradigm, but to the extent their conceptualization rests on neoclassical assumptions such as imperfect factor markets and profits as rents, these models also imply a trade-off between competitive advantage and (...)
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  44. Louis M. Herman, Stan A. Kuczaj & Mark D. Holder (1993). Responses to Anomalous Gestural Sequences by a Language-Trained Dolphin: Evidence for Processing of Semantic Relations and Syntactic Information. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 122 (2):184.score: 138.0
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  45. Phyllis C. Lee (2003). Innovation as a Behavioural Response to Environmental Challenges: A Cost and Benefit Approach. In Simon M. Reader & Kevin N. Laland (eds.), Animal Innovation. Oup Oxford.score: 138.0
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  46. John Perry (2007). Situating Semantics: A Response. In Michael O'Rourke Corey Washington (ed.), Situating Semantics: Essays on the Philosophy of John Perry. 507--575.score: 138.0
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  47. Jiří Přibáň (2013). The Self‐Referential Semantics of Sovereignty: A Systems Theoretical Response to (Post)Sovereignty Studies. Constellations 20 (3):406-421.score: 135.0
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  48. Johan Graafland & Lei Zhang (2014). Corporate Social Responsibility in China: Implementation and Challenges. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (1):34-49.score: 135.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is becoming increasingly important in China. This paper investigates the implementation of instruments for dimensions of CSR that are relevant for the Chinese context and the challenges that Chinese companies face. Based on a survey among 109 Chinese companies, we find that formal instruments to implement CSR are rather common. Companies spend most effort in improving the economic aspects of CSR, such as competitiveness, product innovation and process innovation. Only a small minority of the (...)
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  49. John M. Rogan (1990). A Response to Maarschalk's Criticism of “Innovation in South African Education (Part 1): Science Teaching Observed”. Science Education 74 (4):503-505.score: 135.0
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  50. S. Kouider & E. Dupoux (2007). How “Semantic” is Response Priming Restricted to Practiced Items? A Reply to Abrams & Grinspan (2007)☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):954-956.score: 135.0
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