Search results for 'Organ Transplantation ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Fredrik Svenaeus (2010). The Body as Gift, Resource or Commodity? Heidegger and the Ethics of Organ Transplantation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):163-172.
    Three metaphors appear to guide contemporary thinking about organ transplantation. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating organs, the underlying perspective from the side of the state, authorities and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall rather be understood as a resource . The acute scarcity of organs, which generates a desperate demand in relation to a group of potential suppliers who are desperate to an equal extent, leads easily to the gift’s (...)
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  2.  9
    Barbara A. Strassberg (2003). Introduction: Organ Transplantation-A Challenge for Global Ethics. Zygon 38 (3):643-662.
    A social scientific interpretation of the development of global ethics is offered. Both spontaneous and intended mechanisms of the construction of such an ethics within the broader processes of globalization are analyzed, and possible theoretical foundations are suggested. The scientific and technological achievements that gave rise to the medical procedure of organ transplantation generated new questions and challenges that theologians, scholars of religion, natural scientists, and social scientists are now trying to resolve.
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  3.  17
    D. Joralemon (2001). Shifting Ethics: Debating the Incentive Question in Organ Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):30-35.
    The paper reviews the discussion within transplantation medicine about the organ supply and demand problem. The focus is on the evolution of attitudes toward compensation plans from the early 1980s to the present. A vehement rejection on ethical grounds of anything but uncompensated donation—once the professional norm—has slowly been replaced by an open debate of plans that offer financial rewards to persons willing to have their organs, or the organs of deceased kin, taken for transplantation. The paper (...)
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  4.  3
    Michael Potts, Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & David W. Evans (2013). The Ethics of Limiting Informed Debate: Censorship of Select Medical Publications in the Interest of Organ Transplantation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):625-638.
    Recently, several articles in the scholarly literature on medical ethics proclaim the need for “responsible scholarship” in the debate over the proper criteria for death, in which “responsible scholarship” is defined in terms of support for current neurological criteria for death. In a recent article, James M. DuBois is concerned that academic critiques of current death criteria create unnecessary doubt about the moral acceptability of organ donation, which may affect the public’s willingness to donate. Thus he calls for (...)
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  5.  12
    Sam D. Shemie (2007). Clarifying the Paradigm for the Ethics of Donation and Transplantation: Was 'Dead' Really so Clear Before Organ Donation? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):18-.
    Recent commentaries by Verheijde et al, Evans and Potts suggesting that donation after cardiac death practices routinely violate the dead donor rule are based on flawed presumptions. Cell biology, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, critical care life support technologies, donation and transplantation continue to inform concepts of life and death. The impact of oxygen deprivation to cells, organs and the brain is discussed in relation to death as a biological transition. In the face of advancing organ support and replacement technologies, the (...)
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  6.  14
    H. E. Emson (1987). The Ethics of Human Cadaver Organ Transplantation: A Biologist's Viewpoint. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):124-126.
    The rights of the various individuals involved in decision-making in cadaver organ donation are considered, and there is discussion of the relation of human cadavers to the planetary biomass. I conclude that the rights of the potential recipient should outweigh those of the other parties concerned and that education and legislation should recognise and promote this.
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  7.  23
    Ari R. Joffe (2007). The Ethics of Donation and Transplantation: Are Definitions of Death Being Distorted for Organ Transplantation? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):28.
    A recent commentary defends 1) the concept of 'brain arrest' to explain what brain death is, and 2) the concept that death occurs at 2–5 minutes after absent circulation. I suggest that both these claims are flawed. Brain arrest is said to threaten life, and lead to death by causing a secondary respiratory then cardiac arrest. It is further claimed that ventilation only interrupts this way that brain arrest leads to death. These statements imply that brain arrest is not death (...)
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  8.  42
    Lawrence Cohen (2003). Where It Hurts: Indian Material for an Ethics of Organ Transplantation. Zygon 38 (3):663-688.
    This article focuses on ethical issues surrounding the selling and buying of human organs. The author argues that most people who sell their organs in India do so in order to pay already existing debts. The transaction is only temporarily an exchange of “life for life,” and most “donors” are back in debt soon after the operation. The author discusses the flexible ethics that reduce reality to dyadic transactions and the purgatorial ethics that collapse real and imaginary exploitation (...)
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  9.  8
    Michael P. Jaycox (2012). Coercion, Autonomy, and the Preferential Option for the Poor in the Ethics of Organ Transplantation. Developing World Bioethics 12 (3):135-147.
    The debate concerning whether to legalize and regulate the global market in human organs is hindered by a lack of adequate bioethical language. The author argues that the preferential option for the poor, a theological category, can provide the grounding for an inductive moral epistemology adequate for reforming the use of culturally Western bioethical language. He proposes that the traditional, Western concept of bioethical coercion ought to be modified and expanded because the conditions of the market system, as viewed from (...)
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  10.  6
    Bernard M. Dickens (1992). Ethics Committees, Organ Transplantation and Public Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 20 (4):300-306.
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  11. Bernard M. Dickens (1992). Ethics Committees, Organ Transplantation and Public Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):300-306.
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  12.  9
    Benjamin E. Hippen (2012). Review of F. G. Miller and R. D. Truog,Death, Dying and Organ Transplantation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):56-58.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 56-58, June 2012.
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  13.  13
    Mohammed Ghaly (2012). The Ethics of Organ Transplantation: How Comprehensive the Ethical Framework Should Be? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):175-179.
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  14.  1
    Y. Ors (1995). A Matter of Life and Death: Pitfalls in the Ethics of Organ Transplantation. Global Bioethics 8 (1-3):1-11.
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  15.  80
    Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu (2012). Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation. Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range (...)
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  16.  10
    F. Varela (2001). Intimate Distances: Fragments for a Phenomenology of Organ Transplantation. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):259-271.
    In this article, the author uses his recent experience of organ transplantation as the basis for reflection on phenomenologically-derived notions of lived experience, temporality, selfhood and medical ethics.
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  17.  14
    Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor (2009). Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):409-421.
    In 1968, the Harvard criteria equated irreversible coma and apnea with human death and later, the Uniform Determination of Death Act was enacted permitting organ procurement from heart-beating donors. Since then, clinical studies have defined a spectrum of states of impaired consciousness in human beings: coma, akinetic mutism, minimally conscious state, vegetative state and brain death. In this article, we argue against the validity of the Harvard criteria for equating brain death with human death. Brain death does not disrupt (...)
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  18.  18
    Céline Durand, Andrée Duplantie, Yves Chabot, Hubert Doucet & Marie-Chantal Fortin (2013). How is Organ Transplantation Depicted in Internal Medicine and Transplantation Journals. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):39.
    In their book Spare Parts, published in 1992, Fox and Swazey criticized various aspects of organ transplantation, including the routinization of the procedure, ignorance regarding its inherent uncertainties, and the ethos of transplant professionals. Using this work as a frame of reference, we analyzed articles on organ transplantation published in internal medicine and transplantation journals between 1995 and 2008 to see whether Fox and Swazey’s critiques of organ transplantation were still relevant.
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  19.  5
    Mihaela-Cornelia Frunza, Sandu Frunza, Catalin-Vasile Bobb & Ovidiu Grad (2010). Altruistic Living Unrelated Organ Donation at the Crossroads of Ethics and Religion. A Case Study. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (27):3-24.
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} This article discusses a series of ethical and religious elements that occur in the debate concerning altruistic living unrelated organ donation. Our main focus is on the ethical attitude of altruist donation. In order to illustrate the connections between ethics and religion we use as a case study (...)
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  20.  6
    Hakan Ertin, Arzu Kader Harmanci, Fatih Selami Mahmutoglu & Ibrahim Basagaoglu (2010). Nurse-Focused Ethical Solutions to Problems in Organ Transplantation. Nursing Ethics 17 (6):705-714.
    Technological developments in recent years have brought about a rapid increase in the number and variety of organ transplants, leading to problems in finding enough organs to meet the need. Organ transplantation has also become a particularly significant issue in medical ethics, especially regarding the question of how and from whom organs are procured. Many methods have been tried in order to solve these problems and discussed from an ethical perspective. This study investigates the Spanish, Belgian (...)
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  21.  4
    Michael Nair‐Collins (2015). Taking Science Seriously in the Debate on Death and Organ Transplantation. Hastings Center Report 45 (6):38-48.
    The concept of death and its relationship to organ transplantation continue to be sources of debate and confusion among academics, clinicians, and the public. Recently, an international group of scholars and clinicians, in collaboration with the World Health Organization, met in the first phase of an effort to develop international guidelines for determination of death. The goal of this first phase was to focus on the biology of death and the dying process while bracketing legal, ethical, cultural, and (...)
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  22.  5
    Kristin Zeiler (2014). A Phenomenological Approach to the Ethics of Transplantation Medicine: Sociality and Sharing When Living-with and Dying-with Others. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):369-388.
    Recent years have seen a rise in the number of sociological, anthropological, and ethnological works on the gift metaphor in organ donation contexts, as well as in the number of philosophical and theological analyses of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in the ethical debate on organ donation. In order to capture the breadth of this field, four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine have been distinguished: property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. (...)
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  23.  15
    J. Coggon (2013). Elective Ventilation for Organ Donation: Law, Policy and Public Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):130-134.
    This paper examines questions concerning elective ventilation, contextualised within English law and policy. It presents the general debate with reference both to the Exeter Protocol on elective ventilation, and the considerable developments in legal principle since the time that that protocol was declared to be unlawful. I distinguish different aspects of what might be labelled elective ventilation policies under the following four headings: ‘basic elective ventilation’; ‘epistemically complex elective ventilation’; ‘practically complex elective ventilation’; and ‘epistemically and practically complex elective ventilation’. (...)
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  24. Jay Katz & Alexander Morgan Capron (1975). Catastrophic Diseases Who Decides What? : A Psychosocial and Legal Analysis of the Problems Posed by Hemodialysis and Organ Transplantation.
     
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  25.  10
    Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan McGregor (2007). Recovery of Transplantable Organs After Cardiac or Circulatory Death: Transforming the Paradigm for the Ethics of Organ Donation. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):8-.
    Organ donation after cardiac or circulatory death (DCD) has been introduced to increase the supply of transplantable organs. In this paper, we argue that the recovery of viable organs useful for transplantation in DCD is not compatible with the dead donor rule and we explain the consequential ethical and legal ramifications. We also outline serious deficiencies in the current consent process for DCD with respect to disclosure of necessary elements for voluntary informed decision making and respect for the (...)
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  26.  52
    Jeremy Snyder (2009). Easy Rescues and Organ Transplantation. HEC Forum 21 (1):27-53.
    Many people in desperate need of an organ will die on waiting lists for transplantation or face increased morbidity because of their wait. This circumstance is particularly troubling since many viable organs for transplantation go unused when individuals fail to participate in their local organ donation system. In this paper, I consider whether participating in organ transplantation should be considered a form of a rescue of others from the (...)
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  27.  15
    Franklin G. Miller & Robert Truog (2011). Death, Dying, and Organ Donation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. Oxford University Press.
    This book challenges fundamental doctrines of established medical ethics. It is argued that the routine practice of stopping life support technology causes the death of patients and that donors of vital organs (hearts, liver, lungs, and both kidneys) are not really dead at the time that their organs are removed for life-saving transplantation. Although these practices are ethically legitimate, they are not compatible with traditional medical ethics: they conflict with the norms that doctors must not intentionally cause (...)
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  28.  17
    Robert A. Crouch & Carl Elliott (1999). Moral Agency and the Family: The Case of Living Related Organ Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):275-287.
    Living related organ transplantation is morally problematic for two reasons. First, it requires surgeons to perform nontherapeutic, even dangerous procedures on healthy donors—and in the case of children, without their consent. Second, the transplant donor and recipient are often intimately related to each other, as parent and child, or as siblings. These relationships challenge our conventional models of medical decisionmaking. Is there anything morally problematic about a parent allowing the interests of one child to be risked for the (...)
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  29.  77
    Thomas A. Shannon (2001). The Kindness of Strangers: Organ Transplantation in a Capitalist Age. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (3):285-303.
    : The topic of organ transplantation is examined from the perspective of three authors: Robert Bellah, Jeremy Rifkin, and Margaret Jane Radin. Introduced by reflections on the development of the justification of organ transplantation within the Roman Catholic community and the various themes raised by the historical study in Richard Titmuss's The Gift Relationship, the paper examines how and in what ways the possible commodification of organs will affect our society and the impacts this may have (...)
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  30.  4
    Thomas Gutmann (1998). Medizinische Ethik Und Organtransplantation. Ethik in der Medizin 10 (1):58-67.
    During the last two decades a broad and intensive discussion has taken place in the field of medical ethics. Especially in the English-speaking countries, “Biomedical Ethics” have developed as a part of secular, philosophical moral theory. Two ethical problems in organ transplantation – living organ donation and organ allocation – illustrate that this transition reflects both the complex ethical questions raised by rapid changes in the biological sciences and in health care, and the fact (...)
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  31.  7
    R. D. Strous, T. Bergman-Levy & B. Greenberg (2012). Postmortem Brain Donation and Organ Transplantation in Schizophrenia: What About Patient Consent? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (7):442-444.
    In patients with schizophrenia, consent postmortem for organ donation for transplantation and research is usually obtained from relatives. By means of a questionnaire, the authors investigate whether patients with schizophrenia would agree to family members making such decisions for them as well as compare decisions regarding postmortem organ transplantation and brain donation between patients and significant family members. Study results indicate while most patients would not agree to transplantation or brain donation for research, a proportion (...)
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  32.  5
    Lawrence P. Mcchesney & Susan S. Braithwaite (1999). Expectations and Outcomes in Organ Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):299-310.
    The coauthors of this dialogue, a surgeon and an internist, work together on an institutional patient selection committee for transplantation of solid organs. They have observed a spectrum of outcomes of organ transplantation, mostly favorable, at several institutions.
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  33.  1
    Leonardo D. De Castro (2013). The Declaration of Istanbul in the Philippines: Success with Foreigners but a Continuing Challenge for Local Transplant Tourism. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):929-932.
    The Philippine government officially responded to the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and the related WHO Guidelines on organ transplantation by prohibiting all transplants to foreigners using Filipino organs. However, local tourists have escaped the regulatory radar, leaving a very wide gap in efforts against human trafficking and transplant tourism. Authorities need to deal with the situation seriously, at a minimum, by issuing clear procedures for verifying declarations of kinship or emotional bonds between donors and recipients. (...)
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  34. Courtney S. Campbell (2004). Harvesting the Living?: Separating Brain Death and Organ Transplantation. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):301-318.
    : The chronic shortage of transplantable organs has reached critical proportions. In the wake of this crisis, some bioethicists have argued there is sufficient public support to expand organ recovery through use of neocortical criteria of death or even pre-mortem organ retrieval. I present a typology of ways in which data gathered from the public can be misread or selectively used by bioethicists in service of an ideological or policy agenda, resulting in bad policy and bad ethics. (...)
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  35.  23
    I. H. Kerridge (2002). Death, Dying and Donation: Organ Transplantation and the Diagnosis of Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):89.
    Refusal of organ donation is common, and becoming more frequent. In Australia refusal by families occurred in 56% of cases in 1995 in New South Wales, and had risen to 82% in 1999, becoming the most important determinant of the country's very low organ donation rate .Leading causes of refusal, identified in many studies, include the lack of understanding by families of brain death and its implications, and subsequent reluctance to relegate the body to purely instrumental status. It (...)
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  36.  6
    A. Ravelingien (2004). Proceeding with Clinical Trials of Animal to Human Organ Transplantation: A Way Out of the Dilemma. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):92-98.
    The transplantation of porcine organs to humans could in the future be a solution to the worldwide organ shortage, but is to date still highly experimental. Further research on the potential effects of crossing the species barrier is essential before clinical application is acceptable. However, many crucial questions on efficacy and safety will ultimately only be answered by well designed and controlled solid organ xenotransplantation trials on humans. This paper is concerned with the question under which conditions, (...)
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  37.  3
    Anne Moates (2006). Emerging Transplantation Ethics. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (1):7.
    Moates, Anne Organ donation, the ultimate gift a person can make to benefit humanity has its own share of risks and benefits along with some transplant ethics including issues such as coercion, solicitation, discrimination and exploitation. One of the most important dilemma emerging in transplant ethics is the issue of whether some sort of financial recompense be made in exchange for viable transplantable human organs is contentious.
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  38.  9
    Michael Devita, Mark P. Aulisio & Thomas May (2001). Transplantation Ethics: Old Questions, New Answers? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):357-360.
    The first reported successful kidney transplantation occurred in 1954, between twins. Since then, organ donation and transplantation has become less a medical marvel than a common expectation of patients with a variety of diseases resulting in organ failure. Those expectations have caused demand for organs to skyrocket far beyond available supply, fueling an organ shortage and resulting in over 60,000 patients on transplant waiting lists. In this special issue, our contributors attempt to shed new light (...)
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  39.  6
    Thomas S. Huddle, Michael A. Schwartz, F. Amos Bailey & Michael A. Bos (2008). Death, Organ Transplantation and Medical Practice. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):5.
    A series of papers in Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine (PEHM) have recently disputed whether non-heart beating organ donors are alive and whether non-heart beating organ donation (NHBD) contravenes the dead donor rule. Several authors who argue that NHBD involves harvesting organs from live patients appeal to.
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  40.  3
    M. T. Hilhorst (2008). "Living Apart Together": Moral Frictions Between Two Coexisting Organ Transplantation Schemes. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):484-488.
    Cadaveric transplantation and living transplantation exist side by side. Both practices help to alleviate organ need. They provide us with two separate moral schemes. Is it rational to keep them apart? The cadaveric system is organised along strict, impartial lines, while the living system is inherently partial and local. The ethical justification for this partial scheme seems to be that it merely supplements the cadaveric scheme: partial transplants do not come at the expense of cadaveric impartiality, but (...)
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  41. M. T. Hilhorst (2008). “Living Apart Together”: Moral Frictions Between Two Coexisting Organ Transplantation Schemes. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):484-488.
    Cadaveric transplantation and living transplantation exist side by side. Both practices help to alleviate organ need. They provide us with two separate moral schemes. Is it rational to keep them apart? The cadaveric system is organised along strict, impartial lines, while the living system is inherently partial and local. The ethical justification for this partial scheme seems to be that it merely supplements the cadaveric scheme: partial transplants do not come at the expense of cadaveric impartiality, but (...)
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  42.  12
    Ruby Catsanos, Wendy Rogers & Mianna Lotz (2013). The Ethics of Uterus Transplantation. Bioethics 27 (2):65-73.
    Human uterus transplantation is currently under investigation as a treatment for uterine infertility. Without a uterus transplant, the options available to women with uterine infertility are adoption or surrogacy; only the latter has the potential for a genetically related child. UTx will offer recipients the chance of having their own pregnancy. This procedure occurs at the intersection of two ethically contentious areas: assisted reproductive technologies and organ transplantation. In relation to organ transplantation, UTx lies with (...)
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  43.  3
    David B. Dillard-Wright (2012). Life, Transferable: Questioning the Commodity-Based Approach to Transplantation Ethics. Society and Animals 20 (2):138-153.
    Some bioethicists have proposed a legalized market in human organs as a solution to transplant waiting lists and global poverty. Solutions to organ procurement problems that are solely market-based would unfairly shift the burdens of medical procedures onto developing nations. Market advocates base their claims on the understanding of organs as property, a position that should be problematized. Instrumentalizing people in this way is part of the broader commodification of animals and the environment. Combating the market mentality requires a (...)
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  44.  14
    Mohamed Rady, Joseph Verheijde & Muna Ali (2009). Islam and End-of-Life Practices in Organ Donation for Transplantation: New Questions and Serious Sociocultural Consequences. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 21 (2):175-205.
    Islam and End-of-Life Practices in Organ Donation for Transplantation: New Questions and Serious Sociocultural Consequences Content Type Journal Article Pages 175-205 DOI 10.1007/s10730-009-9095-8 Authors Mohamed Y. Rady, Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix 5777 East Mayo Boulevard Phoenix Arizona USA 85054 Joseph L. Verheijde, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine 5777 East Mayo Boulevard Phoenix Arizona USA 85054 Muna S. Ali, Arizona State University Phoenix Arizona USA Journal HEC Forum Online ISSN 1572-8498 Print ISSN 0956-2737 Journal Volume Volume (...)
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  45.  10
    Michael Potts (2007). Truthfulness in Transplantation: Non-Heart-Beating Organ Donation. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):17-.
    The current practice of organ transplantation has been criticized on several fronts. The philosophical and scientific foundations for brain death criteria have been crumbling. In addition, donation after cardiac death, or non-heartbeating-organ donation (NHBD) has been attacked on grounds that it mistreats the dying patient and uses that patient only as a means to an end for someone else's benefit.
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  46.  17
    Alister Browne (2007). The Institute of Medicine on Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):75-86.
    The current main source of transplantable organs is from heart-beating donors. These are patients who have suffered a catastrophic brain injury, been ventilated, declared dead by neurological criteria, and had their vital functions maintained mechanically until the point of transplantation. But the demand for organs far outstrips the supply, and these patients are not the only potential donors. The idea behind non-heart-beating transplantation is to expand the donor pool by including in it patients who are in hopeless conditions (...)
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  47. Abul Fadl Mohsin Ebrahim (2001). Organ Transplantation, Euthanasia, Cloning and Animal Experimentation an Islamic View.
     
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  48.  13
    D. J. Isch (2007). In Defense of the Reverence of All Life: Heideggerean Dissolution of the Ethical Challenges of Organ Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):441-459.
    During the past 50 years since the first successful organ transplant, waiting lists of potential organ recipients have expanded exponentially as supply and demand have been on a collision course. The recovery of organs from patients with circulatory determination of death is one of several effective alternative approaches recommended to reduce the supply-and-demand gap. However, renewed debate ensues regarding the ethical management of the overarching risks, pressures, challenges and conflicts of interest inherent in organ retrieval after circulatory (...)
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  49.  2
    A. Wrigley (2013). Wanted Dead or Alive: Organ Donation and Ethical Limitations on Surrogate Consent for Non-Competent Living Donors. In A. Wrigley (ed.), Ethics, Law and Society, Vol. V. Ashgate 209-234.
  50.  27
    Kenneth F. Schaffner (1998). Paradigm Changes in Organ Transplantation: A Journey Toward Selflessness? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (5):425-440.
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