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Profile: Ori Lev
Profile: Ori Lev
  1. Ori Lev (2011). Will Biomedical Enhancements Undermine Solidarity, Responsibility, Equality and Autonomy? Bioethics 25 (4):177--184.
    Prominent thinkers such as Jurgen Habermas and Michael Sandel are warning that biomedical enhancements will undermine fundamental political values. Yet whether biomedical enhancements will undermine such values depends on how biomedical enhancements will function, how they will be administered and to whom. Since only few enhancements are obtainable, it is difficult to tell whether these predictions are sound. Nevertheless, such warnings are extremely valuable. As a society we must, at the very least, be aware of developments that could have harmful (...)
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  2. Ori Lev, Franklin G. Miller & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2010). The Ethics of Research on Enhancement Interventions. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (2):101-113.
    Traditionally, biomedical research has been devoted to improvement in the understanding and treatment or prevention of disease. Building on the knowledge generated by the long history of disease-oriented research, the next few decades will witness an explosion of biomedical enhancements to make people faster, stronger, smarter, less forgetful, happier, prettier, and live longer (Turner et al. 2003; Vastag 2004; Rose 2002). As with other biomedical interventions, research to assess the safety and efficacy of these enhancements in humans should be conducted (...)
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  3. Ori Lev (2008). Assessing the Importance of Maintaining Soldiers' Moral Responsibility—Possible Trade-Offs. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):44 – 45.
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