Search results for 'Origin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Leonardo V. Distaso (2009). On the Common Origin of Music and Philosophy: Plato, Nietzsche, and Benjamin. Topoi 28 (2):137-142.score: 18.0
    The essay shows the common ground between music and philosophy from the origin of Western philosophy to the crisis of metaphysical thinking, in particular with Nietzsche and Benjamin. At the beginning, the relationship between philosophy and music is marked by the hegemony of the word on the sound. This is the nature of the Platonic idea of music. With Nietzsche and Benjamin this hegemony is denied and a new vision of the relationship becomes possible. The sound is the (...) both of language and of music. In thinking about this origin, philosophy shows that “thinking about music” is “thinking in music”, and that this thinking is the origin of philosophy itself. (shrink)
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  2. Attila Grandpierre (2013). The Origin of Cellular Life and Biosemiotics. Biosemiotics (3):1-15.score: 18.0
    Recent successes of systems biology clarified that biological functionality is multilevel. We point out that this fact makes it necessary to revise popular views about macromolecular functions and distinguish between local, physico-chemical and global, biological functions. Our analysis shows that physico-chemical functions are merely tools of biological functionality. This result sheds new light on the origin of cellular life, indicating that in evolutionary history, assignment of biological functions to cellular ingredients plays a crucial role. In this wider picture, even (...)
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  3. David Penny (2005). An Interpretive Review of the Origin of Life Research. Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):633-671.score: 18.0
    Life appears to be a natural property of matter, but the problem of its origin only arose after early scientists refuted continuous spontaneous generation. There is no chance of life arising ‘all at once’, we need the standard scientific incremental explanation with large numbers of small steps, an approach used in both physical and evolutionary sciences. The necessity for considering both theoretical and experimental approaches is emphasized. After describing basic principles that are available (including the Darwin-Eigen cycle), the search (...)
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  4. R. C. Carrier (2004). The Argument From Biogenesis: Probabilities Against a Natural Origin of Life. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 19 (5):739-764.score: 18.0
    No evidence exists that the accidental origin of life is too improbable to have occurred naturally, but there are numerous attempts to argue so. Dizzying statistics are cited to show that a god had to be responsible. This paper identifies the Argument from Biogenesis, then explains why all these arguments so far fail, and what would actually have to be done to make such an argument succeed. Describes seven general types of error, with examples. Includes a table of forty-seven (...)
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  5. Vladimir G. Red'ko (2000). Evolution of Cognition: Towards the Theory of Origin of Human Logic. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 5 (3):323-338.score: 18.0
    The main problem discussed in this paper is: Why and how did animal cognition abilities arise? It is argued that investigations of the evolution of animal cognition abilities are very important from an epistemological point of view. A new direction for interdisciplinary researches – the creation and development of the theory of human logic origin – is proposed. The approaches to the origination of such a theory (mathematical models of ``intelligent invention'' of biological evolution, the cybernetic schemes of evolutionary (...)
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  6. James F. Woodward (2004). Flux Capacitors and the Origin of Inertia. Foundations of Physics 34 (10):1475-1514.score: 18.0
    The explanation of inertia based on “Mach's principle” is briefly revisited and an experiment whereby the gravitational origin of inertia can be tested is described. The test consists of detecting a small stationary force with a sensitive force sensor. The force is presumably induced when a periodic transient Mach effect mass fluctuation is driven in high voltage, high energy density capacitors that are subjected to 50 kHz, 1.3 kV amplitude voltage signal, and threaded by an alternating magnetic flux of (...)
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  7. John David Pizer (1995). Toward a Theory of Radical Origin: Essays on Modern German Thought. University of Nebraska Press.score: 18.0
    This provocative book addresses one of the central and most controversial branches of Western thought: the philosophy of origin. In light of recent poststructuralist principles such as alterity, diffe;rance , and dissemination, the philosophy of origin seems to exemplify the repressive, reactionary tendencies of much of the Western philosophical tradition. John Pizer aims to overturn this recent antipathy to the philosophy of origin. He ably summarizes poststructuralist critiques of that earlier philosophical tradition, then turns to five German (...)
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  8. Makmiller Pedroso (2014). Origin Essentialism in Biology. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):60-81.score: 18.0
    Kripke argues for origin essentialism, the view that the same individual cannot have multiple origins. Sober hypothesises that Kripke's origin essentialism applies to biological species. This paper shows that Sober's hypothesis fails. Because Kripke's original argument is invalid, it cannot vindicate Sober's proposal. Salmon offers an influential reformulation of Kripke's argument but his argument fails to extend to species: the notion of an individual's origin is too narrow to apply to species, and Salmon's argument rests on a (...)
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  9. Juan Manuel Torres (1996). Competing Research Programmes on the Origin of Life. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 27 (2):325-346.score: 18.0
    During the course of its short history the discipline concerned with the origin of life has given birth to several scientific programmes in the Lakatosian sense, two of the most prominent and widespread being those initiated by Oparin (life began from protein entities) and Muller-Haldane (life began from genetic entities). The present paper sets down the bases for the rational reconstruction of both views by identifying their hard core and some of their successive developments. An assessment is made of (...)
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  10. Zann Gill (2013). The Other Edge of Ockham's Razor: The A-PR Hypothesis and the Origin of Mind. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (3):403-419.score: 18.0
    Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution characterized all life as engaged in a “struggle for existence”. To struggle requires internal data processing to detect and interpret patterns to guide behavior, a mechanism to struggle for existence. The cognitive bootstrapping A-PR cycle (Autonomy | Pattern Recognition) couples the origin of life and mind, enabling their symbiotic co-evolution. Life processes energy to create order. Mind processes data to create meaning. Life and mind co-evolve toward increased functional effectiveness, using A-PR feedback cycles that (...)
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  11. Anton Sukhoverkhov (2012). Natural Signs and the Origin of Language. Biosemiotics 5 (2):153-159.score: 18.0
    This article considers natural signs and their role in the origin of language. Natural signs, sometimes called primary signs, are connected with their signified by causal relationships, concomitance, or likeliness. And their acquisition is directed by both objective reality and past experience (memory). The discovery and use of natural signs is a required prerequisite of existence for any living systems because they are indispensable to movement, the search for food, regulation, communication, and many other information-related activities. It is argued (...)
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  12. Robert P. O'Shea Manja van Rhijn, Urte Roeber (2013). Can Eye of Origin Serve as a Deviant? Visual Mismatch Negativity From Binocular Rivalry. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    The visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) is a negative deflection in an event-related potential (ERP) between 200 and 400 ms after onset of an infrequent stimulus in a sequence of frequent stimuli. Binocular rivalry occurs when one image is presented to one eye and a different image is presented to the other. Although the images in the two eyes are unchanging, perception alternates unpredictably between the two images for as long as one cares to look. Binocular rivalry, therefore, provides a useful (...)
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  13. Marcello Barbieri (2010). On the Origin of Language. Biosemiotics 3 (2):201-223.score: 18.0
    Thomas Sebeok and Noam Chomsky are the acknowledged founding fathers of two research fields which are known respectively as Biosemiotics and Biolinguistics and which have been developed in parallel during the past 50 years. Both fields claim that language has biological roots and must be studied as a natural phenomenon, thus bringing to an end the old divide between nature and culture. In addition to this common goal, there are many other important similarities between them. Their definitions of language, for (...)
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  14. Sung Uk Lim (2011). The Myth of Origin in Context Through the Lens of Deconstruction, Dialogism and Hybridity. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (29):112-131.score: 18.0
    The present study aims to deconstruct the myth of origin, a quest after essential identity, in the context of Japan's colonization of Korea (1910-1945). First, I will contextualize the myth of origin as a particular historical construction of Japanese colonization, which stems from Romantic nationalism in the second half of the 19 th century. Then, I will critique the structuralism, monologism, and colonialism standing behind the myth of origin through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity: (1) (...)
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  15. Mariko Ogawa (2001). The Mysterious Mr. Collins: Living for 140 Years in "Origin of Species&Quot;. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):461 - 479.score: 18.0
    In "Origin of Species," the object of intense research for nearly a century and a half, Charles Darwin refers to a "Mr. Collins" as if he were a famous cattle breeder. In fact, there is no mention of a famous cattle breeder called Collins anywhere else in the literature, although there is a suitable candidate for this description by the name of "Colling." Darwin's reference to Mr. Collins is probably an error. This paper will attempt to establish the identity (...)
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  16. Robin Hanson (2006). Uncommon Priors Require Origin Disputes. Theory and Decision 61 (4):319-328.score: 16.0
    In standard belief models, priors are always common knowledge. This prevents such models from representing agents’ probabilistic beliefs about the origins of their priors. By embedding standard models in a larger standard model, however, pre-priors can describe such beliefs. When an agent’s prior and pre-prior are mutually consistent, he must believe that his prior would only have been different in situations where relevant event chances were different, but that variations in other agents’ priors are otherwise completely unrelated to which events (...)
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  17. Martin Heidegger (2004). On the Essence of Language: The Metaphysics of Language and the Essencing of the Word ; Concerning Herder's Treatise on the Origin of Language/ Martin Heidegger ; Translated by Wanda Torres Gregory and Yvonne Unna. State University of New York Press.score: 15.0
    This English translation of Vom Wesen der Sprache, volume 85 of Martin Heidegger's Gesamtausgabe, contains fascinating discussions of language that are important both for those interested in Heidegger's thought and for those who wish to ...
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  18. Richard M. Pagni (2009). The Weak Nuclear Force, the Chirality of Atoms, and the Origin of Optically Active Molecules. Foundations of Chemistry 11 (2):105-122.score: 15.0
    Although chemical phenomena are primarily associated with electrons in atoms, ions, and molecules, the masses, charges, spins, and other properties of the nuclei in these species contribute significantly as well. Isotopes, for instance, have proven invaluable in chemistry, in particular the elucidation of reaction mechanisms. Elements with unstable nuclei, for example carbon-14 undergoing beta decay, have enriched chemistry and many other scientific disciplines. The nuclei of all elements have a much more subtle and largely unknown effect on chemical phenomena. All (...)
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  19. Jessy Giroux (2011). The Origin of Moral Norms: A Moderate Nativist Account. Dialogue 50 (02):281-306.score: 15.0
    In this paper, I distinguish between two families of theories which view moral norms as either “inputs” or “outputs.” I argue that the most plausible version of each model can ultimately be seen as the two sides of the same model, which I call Moderate Nativism. The difference between these two apparently antagonistic models is one of perspective rather than content: while the Input model explains how emotional dispositions constrain the historical evolution of moral norms, the Output model explains how (...)
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  20. Anselm Jappe (2013). Sohn-Rethel and the Origin of 'Real Abstraction': A Critique of Production or a Critique of Circulation? Historical Materialism 21 (1):3-14.score: 15.0
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  21. Patrick Hutchings (2012). 'The Origin of the Work of Art': Heidegger. Sophia 51 (4):465-478.score: 15.0
    Professor Max Charlesworth and I worked, at Deakin University, on a course, 'Understanding Art'. Max was interested in the Social History of Art and in art as: 'giving form to mere matter'. Here 'form' might be read as 'lucid', 'exemplary', 'beautiful' etcetera. I am an Aristotle Poetics 4 man '… imitating something with the utmost veracity in a picture', and an Aristotle and John Cage man: 'Art is the imitation of nature in the manner of operation. Or a net'. (Cage) (...)
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  22. Petar Bojanic (2012). Violence as the Origin of Institution (Deleuze with Hume and Saint-Just). Iride 25 (1):79-90.score: 15.0
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  23. Sten F. Odenwald (1990). A Modern Look at the Origin of the Universe. Zygon 25 (1):25-45.score: 15.0
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  24. Stanley Salthe (2005). Energy and Semiotics: The Second Law and the Origin of Life. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (1):128-145.score: 15.0
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  25. Aili Bresnahan (2009). The Dynamic Phenomenon of Art in Heidegger's The Origin of the Work of Art. American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 1 (2).score: 15.0
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  26. Yaacov Davidov & Edouard Jurkevitch (2009). Predation Between Prokaryotes and the Origin of Eukaryotes. Bioessays 31 (7):748-757.score: 15.0
  27. Marcello Barbieri (2011). Origin and Evolution of the Brain. Biosemiotics 4 (3):369-399.score: 15.0
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  28. Jim Bingen (2012). Labels of Origin for Food, the New Economy and Opportunities for Rural Development in the US. Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):543-552.score: 15.0
    This paper draws upon the events surrounding two small United States Department of Agriculture-funded projects in order to explore some preliminary ideas about the influence of corporations in US policy-making through federal advisory committees created by the 1972 Federal Advisory Committee Act. Following a synopsis of the political controversy created by the efforts of these projects to generate more discussion of geographical indications in the US, this paper outlines a path for further analysis of the relationships between members of advisory (...)
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  29. César Cobaleda & Isidro Sánchez‐García (2009). B‐Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: Towards Understanding its Cellular Origin. Bioessays 31 (6):600-609.score: 15.0
  30. Kirill V. Mikhailov, Anastasiya V. Konstantinova, Mikhail A. Nikitin, Peter V. Troshin, Leonid Yu Rusin, Vassily A. Lyubetsky, Yuri V. Panchin, Alexander P. Mylnikov, Leonid L. Moroz, Sudhir Kumar & Vladimir V. Aleoshin (2009). The Origin of Metazoa: A Transition From Temporal to Spatial Cell Differentiation. Bioessays 31 (7):758-768.score: 15.0
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  31. Hilde S. Hein (1971). On the Nature and Origin of Life. New York,Mcgraw-Hill.score: 15.0
     
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  32. John S. Wilkins, Ian Musgrave & Clem Stanyon (2012). Selection Without Replicators: The Origin of Genes, and the Replicator/Interactor Distinction in Etiobiology. Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):215-239.score: 14.0
    Genes are thought to have evolved from long-lived and multiply-interactive molecules in the early stages of the origins of life. However, at that stage there were no replicators, and the distinction between interactors and replicators did not yet apply. Nevertheless, the process of evolution that proceeded from initial autocatalytic hypercycles to full organisms was a Darwinian process of selection of favourable variants. We distinguish therefore between Neo-Darwinian evolution and the related Weismannian and Central Dogma divisions, on the one hand, and (...)
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  33. Sonia Roca-Royes & Ross Cameron (2006). Rohrbaugh and deRosset on the Necessity of Origin. Mind 115 (458):361-366.score: 14.0
    In ‘A New Route to the Necessity of Origin’, Rohbraugh and deRosset offer an argument for the Necessity of Origin appealing neither to Suffciency of Origin nor to a branching-times model of necessity. What is doing the crucial work in their argument is instead the thesis they name ‘Locality of Prevention’. In this response, we object that their argument is question-begging by showing, first, that the locality of prevention thesis is not strong enough to satisfactorily derive from (...)
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  34. Spencer J. Pack & Eric Schliesser (2006). Smith's Humean Criticism of Hume's Account of the Origin of Justice. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):47-63.score: 12.0
    : It is argued that Adam Smith criticizes David Hume's account of the origin of and continuing adherence to the rule of law for being not sufficiently Humean. Hume explained that adherence to the rule of law originated in the self-interest to restrain self-interest. According to Smith, Hume does not pay enough attention to the passions of resentment and admiration, which have their source in the imagination. Smith's offers a more naturalistic and evolutionary account of the psychological pre-conditions of (...)
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  35. Susan Carey (2009). The Origin of Concepts. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Only human beings have a rich conceptual repertoire with concepts like tort, entropy, Abelian group, mannerism, icon and deconstruction. How have humans constructed these concepts? And once they have been constructed by adults, how do children acquire them? While primarily focusing on the second question, in The Origin of Concepts , Susan Carey shows that the answers to both overlap substantially. Carey begins by characterizing the innate starting point for conceptual development, namely systems of core cognition. Representations of core (...)
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  36. Roberta Ballarin (2013). The Necessity of Origin: A Long and Winding Route. Erkenntnis 78 (2):353-370.score: 12.0
    In the last 30 years much philosophical discussion has been generated by Kripke’s proof of the necessity of origin for material objects presented in footnote 56 of ‘Naming and Necessity’. I consider the two most popular reconstructions of Kripke’s argument: one appealing to the necessary sufficiency of origin, and the other employing a strong independence principle allegedly derived from the necessary local nature of prevention. I argue that, to achieve a general result, both reconstructions presuppose an implicit Humean (...)
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  37. Ross Cameron (2005). A Note on Kripke's Footnote 56 Argument for the Essentiality of Origin. Ratio 18 (3):262-275.score: 12.0
    In footnote 56 of his Naming and Necessity, Kripke offers a ‘proof’ of the essentiality of origin. On its most literal reading the argument is clearly flawed, as was made clear by Nathan Salmon. Salmon attempts to save the literal reading of the argument, but I argue that the new argument is flawed as well, and that it can’t be what Kripke intended. I offer an alternative reconstruction of Kripke’s argument, but I show that this suffers from a more (...)
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  38. John Hawthorne & Tamar Szabó Gendler (2000). Origin Essentialism: The Arguments Reconsidered. Mind 109 (434):285-298.score: 12.0
    ln "Possibilities and the Arguments for Origin Essentialism" Teresa Robertson (1998) contends that the best-known arguments in favour of origin essentialism can succeed only at the cost of violating modal common sense—by denying that any variation in constitution or process of assembly is possible. Focusing on the (Kripke-style) arguments of Nathan Salmon and Graeme Forbes, Robertson shows that both founder in the face of sophisticated Ship of Theseus style considerations. While Robertson is right that neither of the arguments (...)
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  39. Tom Huhn (1996). The Movement of Mimesis: Heidegger's 'Origin of the Work of Art' in Relation to Adorno and Lyotard. Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (4):45-69.score: 12.0
    Heidegger formulates the artwork's origin in a movement against the false motion of portrayal and repetition. The term mimesis is employed in the present essay to describe this origin and the means by which truth 'happens', specifically when mimesis turns against itself as imitation. The movement of the artwork is considered within the following constellation: the concept of mimesis is examined in light of Heidegger's 'Origin' essay to illuminate the concept and the essay by placing both in (...)
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  40. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2012). Abstraction and the Origin of General Ideas. Philosophers' Imprint 12 (19):1-22.score: 12.0
    Philosophers have often claimed that general ideas or representations have their origin in abstraction, but it remains unclear exactly what abstraction as a psychological process consists in. We argue that the Lockean aspiration of using abstraction to explain the origins of all general representations cannot work and that at least some general representations have to be innate. We then offer an explicit framework for understanding abstraction, one that treats abstraction as a computational process that operates over an innate quality (...)
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  41. Christopher Gauker (2011). Words and Images: An Essay on the Origin of Ideas. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    At least since Locke, philosophers and psychologists have usually held that concepts arise out of sensory perceptions, thoughts are built from concepts, and language enables speakers to convey their thoughts to hearers. Christopher Gauker holds that this tradition is mistaken about both concepts and language. The mind cannot abstract the building blocks of thoughts from perceptual representations. More generally, we have no account of the origin of concepts that grants them the requisite independence from language. Gauker's alternative is to (...)
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  42. Benjamin Gal-Or (1976). Cosmological Origin of Irreversibility, Time, and Time Anisotropies. II. Gravitism. Foundations of Physics 6 (6):623-637.score: 12.0
    It is proposed to consider a new primary time coordinate whose use resolves a number of standing paradoxes associated with current concepts of time, time asymmetrics, and irreversibility. The origin of absolute cosmic time and its undirectional coupling with local (geocentric) thermodynamics are stressed and formulated. The role of neutrinos in expanding space is discussed together with the question of the microscopic arrow of time (T violations in kaonic systems.) The failure of quantum mechanics to deduce time asymmetries and (...)
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  43. Søren Riis (2011). Towards the Origin of Modern Technology: Reconfiguring Martin Heidegger's Thinking. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):103-117.score: 12.0
    Martin Heidegger’s radical critique of technology has fundamentally stigmatized modern technology and paved the way for a comprehensive critique of contemporary Western society. However, the following reassessment of Heidegger’s most elaborate and influential interpretation of technology, The Question Concerning Technology, sheds a very different light on his critique. In fact, Heidegger’s phenomenological line of thinking concerning technology also implies a radical critique of ancient technology and the fundamental being-in-the-world of humans. This revision of Heidegger’s arguments claims that The Question Concerning (...)
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  44. Victor J. Stenger (2006). A Scenario for a Natural Origin of Our Universe Using a Mathematical Model Based on Established Physics and Cosmology. Philo 9 (2):93-102.score: 12.0
    A mathematical model of the natural origin of our universe is presented. The model is based only on well-established physics. No claim is made that this model uniquely represents exactly how the universe came about. But the viability of a single model serves to refute any assertions that the universe cannot have come about by natural means.
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  45. Joel Pust (2001). Natural Selection Explanation and Origin Essentialism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):201-220.score: 12.0
    Does natural selection explain why individual organisms have the traits that they do? According to "the Negative View," natural selection does not explain why any individual organism has the traits that it does. According to "the Positive View," natural selection at least sometimes does explain why an individual organism has the traits that it does. In this paper, I argue that recent arguments for the Positive View fail in virtue of running afoul of the doctrine of origin essentialism and (...)
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  46. Guy Rohrbaugh & Louis deRosset (2004). A New Route to the Necessity of Origin. Mind 113 (452):705-725.score: 12.0
    Saul Kripke has claimed that there are necessary connections between material things and their material origins. The usual defences of such necessity of origin theses appeal to either a sufficiency of origin principle or a branching-times model of necessity. In this paper we offer a different defence. Our argument proceeds from more modest ‘independence principles’, which govern the processes by which material objects are produced. Independence principles are motivated, in turn, by appeal to a plausible metaphysical principle governing (...)
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  47. Matthew C. Halteman (2006). On the Problematic Origin of the Forms: Plotinus, Derrida, and the Neoplatonic Subtext of Deconstruction's Critique of Ontology. Continental Philosophy Review 39 (1):35-58.score: 12.0
    My aim in this paper is to draw Plotinus and Derrida together in a comparison of their respective appropriations of the famous “receptacle” passage in Plato's Timaeus (specifically, Plotinus' discussion of intelligible matter in Enneads 2.4 and Derrida's essay on Timaeus entitled “Kh ō ra”). After setting the stage with a discussion of several instructive similarities between their general philosophical projects, I contend that Plotinus and Derrida take comparable approaches both to thinking the origin of the forms and to (...)
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  48. John Mahoney (2007). The Challenge of Human Rights: Origin, Development, and Significance. Blackwell Pub..score: 12.0
    The Challenge of Human Rights traces the history of human rights theory from classical antiquity through the enlightenment to the modern human rights movement, and analyses the significance of human rights in today’s increasingly globalized world. Provides an engaging study of the origin and the philosophical and political development of human rights discourse. Offers an original defence of human rights. Explores the significance of human rights in the context of increasing globalisation. Confronts the major objections to human rights, including (...)
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  49. Paul Livingston (2010). The Breath of Sense: Language, Structure, and the Paradox of Origin. Konturen 2.score: 12.0
    Within contemporary analytic philosophy, varieties of “naturalism” have recently attained an almost unchallenged methodological and thematic dominance. As David Papineau wrote in the introduction to his 1993 book Philosophical Naturalism, “nearly everybody nowadays wants to be a naturalist,” although as Papineau also notes, those who aspire to the term also continue to disagree widely about what specific methods or doctrines it implies. My purpose in this paper, however, is not to argue for or against philosophical naturalism on any of the (...)
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  50. Derek A. McDougall (2010). Necessities of Origin and Constitution. Philosophical Investigations 33 (1):24-43.score: 12.0
    The once deeply held conviction that all necessary truths are known a priori is now widely, although by no means universally agreed to have been subjected to penetrating, if not devastating criticism. Scott Soames, for example, on behalf of Saul Kripke, and indirectly of Hilary Putnam, argues that in respect of natural kinds, the introduction of basic essentialist assumptions grounded in our pre-theoretical habits of thinking and speaking – for example, that atomic or molecular structure provides the underlying essence of (...)
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