Search results for 'Orin Levine' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sirine Shebaya, Andrea Sutherland, Orin Levine & Ruth Faden (2010). Alternatives to National Average Income Data as Eligibility Criteria for International Subsidies: A Social Justice Perspective. Developing World Bioethics 10 (3):141-149.score: 240.0
    Current strategies to address global inequities in access to life-saving vaccines use averaged national income data to determine eligibility. While largely successful in the lowest income countries, we argue that this approach could lead to significant inefficiencies from the standpoint of justice if applied to middle-income countries, where income inequalities are large and lead to national averages that obscure truly needy populations. Instead, we suggest alternative indicators more sensitive to social justice concerns that merit consideration by policy-makers developing new initiatives (...)
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  2. Donald N. Levine (1997). Review Symposium on Donald Levine : On Visions and Its Critics. History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):168-173.score: 180.0
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  3. Elliott Sober & Andrew Levine (2003). A Reply to Paul Nolan's 'What's Darwinian About Historical Materialism? A Critique of Levine and Sober'. Historical Materialism 11 (3):177-181.score: 180.0
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  4. Elaine Gumer & Marvin Levine (1971). The Missing Dimension in Concept Learning: Dimensionality or Local Consistency? Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (1):39-44.score: 90.0
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  5. Fred Frankel, Marvin Levine & David Karpf (1970). Human Discrimination Learning: A Test of the Blank-Trials Assumption. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (3):342-348.score: 90.0
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  6. Joseph Levine (2001). Purple Haze: The Puzzle of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Conscious experience presents a deep puzzle. On the one hand, a fairly robust materialism must be true in order to explain how it is that conscious events causally interact with non-conscious, physical events. On the other hand, we cannot explain how physical phenomena give rise to conscious experience. In this wide-ranging study, Joseph Levine explores both sides of the mind-body dilemma, presenting the first book-length treatment of his highly influential ideas on the "explanatory gap," the fact that we can't (...)
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  7. Joseph Levine (2001). Purple Haze. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this wide-ranging study, Joseph Levine explores both sides of the mind-body dilemma, presenting the first book-length treatment of his highly influential ...
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  8. Caroline Levine (2002). The Paradox of Public Art: Democratic Space, the Avant-Garde, and Richard Serra's "Tilted Arc". Philosophy and Geography 5 (1):51 – 68.score: 60.0
    This essay interprets the controversy over Richard Serra's monumental sculpture, Tilted Arc , which was designed for a public plaza in downtown Manhattan in 1979 and then torn down five years later after intense public outcry. Levine reads this controversy as characteristic of contemporary debates over the arts, which continue the tradition of the nineteenth century avant-garde, pitting art against a wider public, and insisting that art must deliberately resist mainstream tastes and values in favor of marginality and innovation. (...)
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  9. Joseph M. Levine (1999). The Autonomy of History: Truth and Method From Erasmus to Gibbon. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    In these learned essays, Joseph M. Levine shows how the idea and method of modern history first began to develop during the Renaissance, when a clear distinction between history and fiction was first proposed. The new claims for history were met by a new skepticism in a debate that still echoes today. Levine's first three essays discuss Thomas More's preoccupation with the distinction between history and fiction Erasmus's biblical criticism and the contribution of Renaissance philology to critical method (...)
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  10. Donald Nathan Levine (2006). Powers of the Mind: The Reinvention of Liberal Learning in America. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    It is one thing to lament the financial pressures put on universities, quite another to face up to the poverty of resources for thinking about what universities should do when they purport to offer a liberal education. In Powers of the Mind, former University of Chicago dean Donald N. Levine enriches those resources by proposing fresh ways to think about liberal learning with ideas more suited to our times. He does so by defining basic values of modernity and then (...)
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  11. Robert J. Levine (1986). Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research. Urban & Schwarzenberg.score: 60.0
    In this book, Dr. Robert J. Levine reviews federal regulations, ethical analysis, and case studies in an attempt to answer these questions.
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  12. Michael Levine & Tamas Pataki (eds.) (2004). Racism in Mind: Philosophical Explanations of Racism and Its Implications. Cornell UP.score: 60.0
    Michael P. Levine, Tamas Pataki. the case of racism. If one understands racism to be rooted in some underlying psychological structure, then while what is ordinarily called racist behavior may well be indicative of such an underlying structure, ...
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  13. Lauren Haaftern-Schick & Sura Levine (2011). Remembering Robert Seydel. Continent 1 (2):141-144.score: 60.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 141-144. This January, while preparing a new course, Robert Seydel was struck and killed by an unexpected heart attack. He was a critically under-appreciated artist and one of the most beloved and admired professors at Hampshire College. At the time of his passing, Seydel was on the brink of a major artistic and career milestone. His Book of Ruth was being prepared for publication by Siglio Press. His publisher describes the book as: “an alchemical assemblage that composes (...)
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  14. Michael P. Levine (1994). Pantheism: A Non-Theistic Concept of Deity. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Many people who do not believe in God believe that 'everything is God' - that everything is part of an all-inclusive divine unity. In Pantheism , this concept is presented as a legitimate position and its philosophical basis is examined. Michael Levine compares it to theism, and discusses the scope for resolving the problems inherent in theism through pantheism. He also considers the implications of pantheism in terms of practice. This book will appeal to those who study philosophy or (...)
     
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  15. Peter Levine (2009). Reforming the Humanities: Literature and Ethics From Dante Through Modern Times. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    This book combines contemporary ethical theory, literary interpretation, and historical narrative to defend a view of the humanities as a source of moral guidance. Peter Levine argues that moral philosophers should interpret narratives and literary critics should adopt moral positions. His new analysis of Dante’s story of Paolo and Francesca sheds new light on the moral advantages and pitfalls of narratives versus ethical theories and principles.
     
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  16. Joseph Levine (1983). Materialism and Qualia: The Explanatory Gap. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64 (October):354-61.score: 30.0
  17. Joseph Levine (1993). On Leaving Out What It's Like. In Martin Davies & Glyn W. Humphreys (eds.), Consciousness: Psychological an Philosophical Essays. MIT Press 543--557.score: 30.0
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  18. Joseph Levine (2006). Conscious Awareness and Representation. In Kenneth Williford & Uriah Kriegel (eds.), Self-Representational Approaches to Consciousness. The MIT Press 173--198.score: 30.0
  19. Joseph Levine (2010). Demonstrative Thought. Mind and Language 25 (2):169-195.score: 30.0
    In this paper I propose a model of demonstrative thought. I distinguish token-demonstratives, that pick out individuals, from type-demonstratives, that pick out kinds, or properties, and provide a similar treatment for both. I argue that it follows from my model of demonstrative thought, as well as from independent considerations, that demonstration, as a mental act, operates directly on mental representations, not external objects. That is, though the relation between a demonstrative and the object or property demonstrated is semantically direct, the (...)
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  20. Joseph Levine & Kelly Trogdon (2009). The Modal Status of Materialism. Philosophical Studies 145 (3):351 - 362.score: 30.0
    Materialism, as traditionally conceived, has a contingent side and a necessary side. The necessity of materialism is reflected by the metaphysics of realization, while its contingency is a matter of accepting the possibility of Cartesian worlds, worlds in which our minds are roughly as Descartes describes them. In this paper we argue that the necessity and the contingency of materialism are in conflict. In particular, we claim that if mental properties are realized by physical properties in the actual world, Cartesian (...)
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  21. Joseph Levine (2006). Color and Color Experience: Colors as Ways of Appearing. Dialectica 60 (3):269-282.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that color is a relational feature of the distal objects of perception, a way of appearing. I begin by outlining three constraints any theory of color should satisfy: (i) physicalism about the non-mental world, (ii) consistency with what is known from color science, and (iii) transparency about color experience. Traditional positions on the ontological status of color, such as physicalist reduction of color to spectral re?ectance, subjectivism, dispositional- ism, and primitivism, fail, I claim, to meet (...)
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  22. Joseph Levine (2003). Experience and Representation. In Quentin Smith & Aleksandar Jokic (eds.), Consciousness: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Pressscore: 30.0
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  23. Joseph Levine (2006). Phenomenal Concepts and the Materialist Constraint. In Torin Alter & Sven Walter (eds.), Phenomenal Concepts and Phenomenal Knowledge: New Essays on Consciousness and Physicalism. Oxford University Pressscore: 30.0
  24. Joseph Levine (2010). The Q Factor: Modal Rationalism Versus Modal Autonomism. Philosophical Review 119 (3):365-380.score: 30.0
    Type-B materialists (to use David Chalmers's jargon) claim that though zombies are conceivable, they are not metaphysically possible. This article calls this position regarding the relation between metaphysical and epistemic modality “modal autonomism,” as opposed to the “modal rationalism” endorsed by David Chalmers and Frank Jackson, who insist on a deep link between the two forms of modality. This article argues that the defense of modal rationalism presented in Chalmers and Jackson (2001) begs the question against the type-B materialist/modal autonomist. (...)
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  25. Joseph Levine (2008). Secondary Qualities: Where Consciousness and Intentionality Meet. The Monist 91 (2):215-236.score: 30.0
  26. Joseph Levine (2010). Phenomenal Experience: A Cartesian Theater Revival. Philosophical Issues 20 (1):209-225.score: 30.0
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  27. Joseph Levine (1998). Conceivability and the Metaphysics of Mind. Noûs 32 (4):449-480.score: 30.0
  28. Louise M. Antony & Joseph Levine (1997). Reduction with Autonomy. Philosophical Perspectives 11 (s11):83-105.score: 30.0
  29. Joseph Levine (2003). Knowing What It's Like. In Brie Gertler (ed.), Privileged Access: Philosophical Accounts of Self-Knowledge. Ashgatescore: 30.0
  30. Joseph Levine (1988). Absent and Inverted Qualia Revisited. Mind and Language 3 (4):271-87.score: 30.0
  31. Christopher M. Raymond, Gerald G. Singh, Karina Benessaiah, Joanna R. Bernhardt, Jordan Levine, Harry Nelson, Nancy J. Turner, Bryan Norton, Jordan Tam & Kai Ma Chan (2013). Ecosystem Services and Beyond. BioScience 63 (7):536-546.score: 30.0
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  32. Joseph Levine (2004). Review: Consciousness and Cognition. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (451):596-599.score: 30.0
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  33. Joseph Levine, Comments on Melnyk's A Physicalist Manifesto.score: 30.0
  34. Joseph Levine (2001). Phenomenal Consciousness and the First-Person. Psyche 7 (10).score: 30.0
    Siewert's book revolves around three theses: that there is a distinctive style of epistemic warrant associated with the first-person point of view, that if we pay close attention to the deliverances of this first-person point of view, we will see that phenomenal consciousness is both real and yet neglected by many current theories that purport to explain consciousness, and that phenomenal consciousness is inherently intentional; one cannot divorce what phenomenal character presents to us from what it's like to have it. (...)
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  35. Steven Levine (2010). Rehabilitating Objectivity: Rorty, Brandom, and the New Pragmatism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):567-589.score: 30.0
    In recent years, a renascent form of pragmatism has developed which argues that a satisfactory pragmatic position must integrate into itself the concepts of truth and objectivity. This New Pragmatism, as Cheryl Misak calls it, is directed primarily against Rorty's neo-pragmatic dismissal of these concepts. For Rorty, the goal of our epistemic practices should not be to achieve an objective view, one that tries to represent things as they are 'in themselves,' but rather to attain a view of things that (...)
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  36. Joseph Levine (1995). On What It is Like to Grasp a Concept. Philosophical Issues 6:38-43.score: 30.0
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  37. Thomas Ricketts & James Levine (1996). Logic and Truth in Frege. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 70:121 - 175.score: 30.0
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  38. J. Levine (2008). Review: Daniel Stoljar: Ignorance and Imagination: The Epistemic Origin of the Problem of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):228-231.score: 30.0
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  39. Steven Levine (2015). Norms and Habits: Brandom on the Sociality of Action. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):248-272.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue against Brandom's two-ply theory of action. For Brandom, action is the result of an agent acknowledging a practical commitment and then causally responding to that commitment by acting. Action is social because the content of the commitment upon which one acts is socially conferred in the game of giving and asking for reasons. On my proposal, instead of seeing action as the coupling of a rational capacity to acknowledge commitments and a non-rational capacity to reliably (...)
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  40. Alexander T. Levine (1999). Scientific Progress and the Fregean Legacy. Mind and Language 14 (3):263–290.score: 30.0
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  41. R. Y. Levine (1985). Isospin as a Hidden Variable. Foundations of Physics 15 (6):667-676.score: 30.0
    A hidden isospin variable is coupled to the spin of particles observed in an EPR experiment. For spin-1/2 it is shown that isospin i≥3/2 is sufficient to ensure a locally realistic spin distribution. For spin-1, examples of violation of the Mermin-Schwarz inequalities in the case of i=0 are shown satisfied with isospin. The general feature of a softening of quantum nonlocality with isospin is suggested, as well as applications to quantum physics at high energy.
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  42. Steven M. Levine (2007). Sellars' Critical Direct Realism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (1):53 – 76.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I attempt to demonstrate the structure of Sellars' critical direct realism in the philosophy of perception. This position is original because it attempts to balance two claims that many have thought to be incompatible: (1) that perceptual knowledge is direct, i.e., not inferential, and (2) that perceptual knowledge is irreducibly conceptual. Even though perceptual episodes are not the result of inferences, they must still stand within the space of reasons if they are to be counted not only (...)
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  43. J. Levine (2011). Consciousness, by Christopher S. Hill. Mind 120 (478):527-530.score: 30.0
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  44. Andrew Levine & Elliott Sober (1985). What's Historical About Historical Materialism? Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):304-326.score: 30.0
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  45. James Levine (2004). On the "Gray's Elegy" Argument and its Bearing on Frege's Theory of Sense. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):251–295.score: 30.0
    In his recent book, "The Metaphysicians of Meaning" (2000), Gideon Makin argues that in the so-called "Gray's Elegy" argument (the GEA) in "On Denoting", Russell provides decisive arguments against not only his own theory of denoting concepts but also Frege's theory of sense. I argue that by failing to recognize fundamental differences between the two theories, Makin fails to recognize that the GEA has less force against Frege's theory than against Russell's own earlier theory. While I agree with many aspects (...)
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  46. Joseph Levine (2001). Matters of Mind: Consciousness, Reason, and Nature Scott Sturgeon. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (3):629-634.score: 30.0
  47. Michael P. Levine (1994). Pantheism, Theism and the Problem of Evil. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 35 (3):129 - 151.score: 30.0
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  48. Michael P. Levine (2000). Contemporary Christian Analytic Philosophy of Religion: Biblical Fundamentalism, Terrible Solutions to a Horrible Problem, and Hearing God. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 48 (2):89-119.score: 30.0
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  49. A. Levine & Mark H. Bickhard (1999). Concepts: Where Fodor Went Wrong. Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):5-23.score: 30.0
    In keeping with other recent efforts, Fodor's CONCEPTS focuses on the metaphysics of conceptual content, bracketing such epistemological questions as, "How can we know the contents of our concepts?" Fodor's metaphysical account of concepts, called "informational atomism," stipulates that the contents of a subject's concepts are fixed by the nomological lockings between the subject and the world. After sketching Fodor's "what else?" argument in support of this view, we offer a number of related criticisms. All point to the same conclusion: (...)
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  50. Joseph M. Levine (2005). Intellectual History as History. Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (2):189-200.score: 30.0
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