Search results for 'Orly Benjamin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew E. Benjamin & Peter Osborne (eds.) (2000). Walter Benjamin's Philosophy: Destruction and Experience. Clinamen Press.score: 260.0
    Why read Walter Benjamin today? There as many answers to this question as there are "Walter Benjamins"--Benjamin as critic, Benjamin as modernist, Benjamin as marxist, Benjamin as Jew. . . . Yet it is Benjamin as philosopher that in one way or another stands behind all these. This collection explores, in Adorno's description, Benjamin's "philosophy directed against philosophy." The essays cover all aspects of Benjamin's writings, from his early work in the philosophy (...)
     
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  2. Sarit Nisim & Orly Benjamin (2008). Power and Size of Firms as Reflected in Cleaning Subcontractors' Practices of Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):673 - 683.score: 240.0
    Recent discussions in the area of corporate social responsibility suggest that organizational size has complex meanings and thus requires more scholarly attention. This article explores organizational size in the context of relative power in inter-organizational networks. To shed light on the ways relative power interacts with size we studied social responsibility practices among cleaning subcontractors in three firms of different sizes. Our focus on the network differentiates these firms on the basis of their size and sector. Semi-structured interviews were used (...)
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  3. Orly Benjamin (2003). The Power of Unsilencing: Between Silence and Negotiation in Heterosexual Relationships. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (1):1–19.score: 240.0
  4. Andrew E. Benjamin & Charles Rice (eds.) (2009). Walter Benjamin and the Architecture of Modernity. Re.Press.score: 150.0
    Walter Benjamin's Politics of 'bad tasteMichael Mac Modernity as an unfinished Project: Benjamin and Political RomanticismRobert Sinnerbrink Violence, ...
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  5. Andrew Benjamin (2012). Morality, Law and the Place of Critique: Walter Benjamin's The Meaning of Time in the Moral World. Critical Horizons 12 (3):281 - 301.score: 150.0
    Critique as a philosophical concept needs to be recast once it is linked to the possibility of a productive opening. In such a context critique has an important affinity to destruction and forms of inauguration. Working through writings of Marx and Walter Benjamin, specifically Benjamin's 'The Meaning of Time in the Moral World', destruction and inauguration are repositioned in terns of othering and the caesura of allowing.
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  6. Andrew Benjamin (2003). Being Roman Now: The Time of Fashion A Commentary on Walter Benjamin's 'Theses on the Philosophy of History' XIV. Thesis Eleven 75 (1):39-53.score: 150.0
    Walter Benjamin’s writings on fashion need to be read as engagements with the problem of historical time and a related politics of time. The aim of this article is to develop this position. Its point of orientation is Thesis XIV from the Theses on the Philosophy of History. What is argued is that close attention to the temporality of change and novelty within fashion may allow an insight into a conception of interruption and the ‘new’, however, it cannot yield (...)
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  7. Andrew Benjamin (2010). Porosity at the Edge : Working Through Walter Benjamin's "Naples". In Walter Benjamin & Gevork Hartoonian (eds.), Walter Benjamin and Architecture. Routledge.score: 150.0
     
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  8. Andrew E. Benjamin (1993). The Plural Event: Descartes, Hegel, Heidegger. Routledge.score: 140.0
    Nothing is more simple or more complicated than the event. In recent years, the attack on any attempts to provide a foundation for philosophy has focused on the "logic of the event." In The Plural Event , Andrew Benjamin reconsiders and reworks philosophy in terms of events and how they are judged. Benjamin offers a sustained philosophical reworking of ontology, providing important readings of key canonical texts in the history of philosophy. In order to avoid the charge of (...)
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  9. Andrew E. Benjamin (ed.) (1991). The Problems of Modernity: Adorno and Benjamin. Routledge.score: 120.0
  10. Walter Benjamin & Gevork Hartoonian (eds.) (2010). Walter Benjamin and Architecture. Routledge.score: 120.0
     
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  11. Harold Raymond Wayne Benjamin (1968). Wakan; the Spirit of Harold Benjamin. Minneapolis, Burgess Pub. Co..score: 120.0
     
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  12. C. A. Baylis, A. Conelius Benjamin, Edgar S. Brightman, Rudolf Carnap, Alonzo Church, G. Watts Cunningham, C. J. Ducasse, Irwin Edman, Hunter Guthrie, J. S., Julius Kraft, Glenn R. Morrow, Joseph Ratner & And Julius R. Welnberg (1942). To the Editor or "Mind". Mind 51 (203):296-a-296.score: 80.0
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  13. Andrew Benjamin, Working with Walter Benjamin: Recovering a Political Philosophy.score: 80.0
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  14. Andrew Benjamin, Benjamin and the Baroque: Posing the Question of Historical Time.score: 80.0
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  15. A. Cornelius Benjamin (1926). To Exist or Not to Exist. The Monist 36 (2):326-339.score: 80.0
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  16. Beatrice Hanssen & Andrew Benjamin, Walter Benjamin's Critical Romanticism : An Introduction.score: 80.0
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  17. Andrew Benjamin, The Absolute as Translatability : Working Through Walter Benjamin on Language.score: 80.0
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  18. Walter Benjamin (2007). Walter Benjamin 160. In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg. 160.score: 80.0
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  19. Jacques Ranciere & Walter Benjamin (2007). A Poetics of Dissent; or, Pantisocracy in America Colin Jager. Theory and Event 10 (1).score: 80.0
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  20. Wesley Phillips (2010). History or Counter-Tradition? The System of Freedom After Walter Benjamin. Critical Horizons 11 (1):99-118.score: 40.0
    I seek to interpret the work of Walter Benjamin in light of the "system programme" of German Idealism, in order to confront an antinomy of contemporary radical thought. Benjamin has been regarded as an anti-Hegelian thinker of the exception. Reading him against the grain, I draw out a concept of counter-tradition that eschews the opposition of intra-historical progress and extra-historical exception. The philological inspiration is a book by Franz Joseph Molitor, student of Schelling and "teacher" of Benjamin: (...)
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  21. D. Renton (2012). On Benjamin's Theses, or the Utility of the Concept of Historical Time. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):380-393.score: 34.0
    :Roger Griffin’s paper points towards the importance of historical time when discussing fascism. Walter Benjamin’s Theses, the discussion of which informs Griffin’s paper, engages with the topic of historical time at several points, especially in its discussion of the theory of progress that Benjamin found in German Social Democracy, to which the Theses was directly opposed. Revisiting sympathetically a theory of progress akin to that of Karl Kautsky and other Marxist writers enables us to add substance to the (...)
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  22. Philip Ross Bullock (2012). Faith or Forgery? : Walter Benjamin and Nikolai Leskov's The Sealed Angel. In Carolin Duttlinger, Ben Morgan & Tony Phelan (eds.), Walter Benjamins Anthropologisches Denken. Rombach.score: 32.0
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  23. Alexei Procyshyn (2013). The Origins of Walter Benjamin's Concept of Philosophical Critique. Metaphilosophy 44 (5):655-681.score: 30.0
    Focusing on Walter Benjamin's earliest pieces dedicated to school reform and the student movement, this article traces the basic critical approaches informing his mature thought back to his struggle to critically implement and transform the theory of concept formation and value presentation developed by his Freiburg teacher, Heinrich Rickert. It begins with an account of Rickert's work, specifically of the concept of Darstellung (presentation) and its central role in Rickert's postmetaphysical theory of historical research (which he characterizes as exclusively (...)
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  24. D. G. Ritchie (1900). Book Review:From Comte to Benjamin Kidd: The Appeal to Biology or Evolution for Human Guidance. Robert Mackintosh. [REVIEW] Ethics 10 (2):252-.score: 30.0
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  25. G. Gilloch (1992). The Heroic Pedestrian or the Pedestrian Hero? Walter Benjamin and the Flaneur. Telos 1992 (91):108-116.score: 30.0
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  26. B. Olivier (1996). No Recording Please! This is ART. Or: What Do Cynthia Hawkins and Walter Benjamin Have in Common (Not)? South African Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):8-14.score: 30.0
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  27. Andrew Pyle (2010). Pt. I, Outsiders. Becoming and Outsider : Gassendi in the History of Philosophy / Margaret J. Osler ; Sir Kenelm Digby, Recusant Philosopher / John Henry ; Theophilus Gale and Historiography of Philosophy / Stephen Pigney ; The Standing of Ralph Cudworth as a Philosopher / Benjamin Carter ; Nicholas Malebranche : Insider or Outsider? [REVIEW] In G. A. J. Rogers, Tom Sorell & Jill Kraye (eds.), Insiders and Outsiders in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Routledge.score: 30.0
  28. Leslie Shade (2001). Book Review: The Digital Divide: Facing a Crisk or Creating a Myth by Benjamin M. Compaine. [REVIEW] Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 31 (3):42-43.score: 30.0
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  29. G. Smith (1995). The so-Called Zauberjuden (or, Crafty Magic Jews)-Benjamin, Walter , Scholem, Gershom, and Other German-Jewish Esoterics Between the World-Wars. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 4 (2):227-243.score: 30.0
     
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  30. O. K. Werckmeister (1996). Walter Benjamin's Angel of History, or the Transfiguration of the Revolutionary Into the Historian. Critical Inquiry 22 (2):239.score: 30.0
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  31. Ted Honderich (2005). On Benjamin Libet: Is the Mind Ahead of the Brain? Behind It? In On Determinism and Freedom. Edinburgh University Press.score: 22.0
    Benjamin Libet and also Libet and collaborators claim to advance a single hypothesis, with important consequences, about the time of a conscious experience in relation to the time when there occurs a certain physical condition in the brain. This condition is spoken of as
    _neural_
    _adequacy_ for the experience, or, as we can as well say, _neural adequacy_ .5 This finding has been taken to throw doubt on theories that take neural and mental events to be in (...)
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  32. Re'em Segev (2008). Responsibility and Moral Luck: Comments on Benjamin Zipursky, 'Two Dimensions of Responsibility in Crime, Tort, and Moral Luck'. Theoretical Inquiries in Law Forum 9 (1):39-46.score: 22.0
    The essence of the moral luck question is whether the responsibility of persons is determined only in light of actions that are within their control or also in light of factors, such as the consequences of their actions, which are beyond their control. Most people seem to have contrasting intuitions regarding this question. On the one hand, there is a common intuition that the responsibility of persons should be judged only in light of what is within their control. On the (...)
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  33. Jeff Malpas, Heidegger in Benjamin's City.score: 22.0
    The commonplace image of Heidegger is of a philosopher firmly rooted, not in the city of Freiburg in which much of his life was spent, but in the Alemannic-Schwabian countryside around the village of Messkirch in which he was born. It would seem that the distance between Heidegger and Benjamin, between Messkirch and Berlin or Paris could not be greater. But to what extent are Heidegger's own personal predilections for the provincial and the bauerlich actually tied to the (...)
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  34. Atsuko Tsuji (2010). Experience in the Very Moment of Writing: Reconsidering Walter Benjamin's Theory of Mimesis. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):125-136.score: 22.0
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the ateleological moment of learning through imitation. In general, we can learn something new through imitating models we are given, which embody the values of our own society, culture and institutions. This means that imitation is understood in terms of the representation or reproduction of original models. In this understanding of imitation, however, the creative aspect of imitation is missed. In relation to this I shall, first, consider learning through imitation in terms (...)
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  35. Miguel Vatter (2011). Married Life, Gay Life as a Work of Art, and Eternal Life: Toward a Biopolitical Reading of Benjamin. Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (4):309-335.score: 22.0
    When political rationality deployed itself on the terrain of the biological life of the human species with the purpose of making this life healthier, more capable, and more "worthy of being lived," it also postulated that some life could be potentiated only at the price of killing off other life. Foucault therefore introduces the idea of biopolitics together with that of thanatopolitics (1990, 137) .Since Foucault, one of the urgent questions has been how biopolitics turns into a thanatopolitics and under (...)
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  36. James Martel (2011). Taking Benjamin Seriously as a Political Thinker. Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (4):297-308.score: 22.0
    Benjamin has long been known for his literary and aesthetic theory but political theorists, as well as other scholars who are interested in questions of politics, tend to downplay (or simply not notice) his contributions to an actionable rhetorical-political discourse. In terms of a politics that speaks directly to the ongoing crisis of global capitalism, existing power arrangements, and the effective depoliticization of the vast majority of people living under such conditions (very much including advanced liberal capitalist democracies such (...)
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  37. James Campbell (1995). The Pragmatism of Benjamin Franklin. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 31 (4):745 - 792.score: 22.0
    This paper discusses aspects of the thought of the American patriot and thinker, Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790). At the present time, Franklin is too often regarded primarily as a scientific amateur whose tinkerings produced nothing of lasting importance, or as a self-centered prig of interest only to others like himself. In reality, Franklin was a thoughtful and concerned individual attempting to advance the common weal, both through his personal struggle toward moral perfection and through the institutionalization of the scientific spirit (...)
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  38. Joseph D. Lewandowski (2005). Street Culture: The Dialectic of Urbanism in Walter Benjamin’s Passagen-Werk. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (3):293-308.score: 22.0
    This article develops a sociological reading of Walter Benjamin’s ‘Arcades Project’, or Passagen-werk . Specifically, the essay seeks to make explicit Benjamin’s non-dualistic account of structure and agency in the urban milieu. I characterize this account as the ‘dialectic of urbanism’, and argue that one of the central insights of Benjamin’s Passagen-werk is that it locates an emergent and innovative cultural form - a distinctive ‘street culture’ or jointly shared way of modern urban life - within haussmannizing (...)
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  39. Luciana Espinosa (2012). Naturaleza caída y sujeto melancólico: una lectura desde la filosofía del lenguaje de Walter Benjamin. Tópicos 24 (24):00-00.score: 22.0
    En el presente artículo sostenemos que el abordaje benjaminiano del problema de la melancolía en El origen del drama barroco alemán (1928) pone en juego la posibilidad de acceder a la estructura profunda del mundo material, mediante el establecimiento de una singular relación entre el sujeto melancólico y la naturaleza caída. Pues, si como el propio Benjamin afirma, todo sentimiento es la resultante de un objeto o de cierta conformación material que opera como su causa, la melancolía, por su (...)
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  40. Simon Sparks, Fatalities: Truth and Tragedy in Texts of Heidegger and Benjamin.score: 22.0
    The following thesis explores the notion of truth as developed in the work of Martin Heidegger and Walter Benjamin. Contrary to the position adopted by many commentators, who seek to drive a wedge between Heidegger's unorthodox phenomenology and the resolutely non -phenomenological Benjamin, I shall want to show how both begin with a rigorously Husserlian conception of truth as an intuition of essence in order, finally, to deviate from it. I argue that, for neither one, can truth be (...)
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  41. Magdalena Zolkos (2011). Can There Be Costless War? Violent Exposures and (In)Vulnerable Selves in Benjamin Percy's “Refresh, Refresh'. Critical Horizons 12 (2):251-269.score: 22.0
    The technological transformation of the conduct of war, exemplified by the American employment of drones in Afghanistan and in Iraq, calls for a critical reflection about the fantasies that underpin, and are in turn animated by, the robotic revolution of the military. At play here is a fantasy of a “costless war" or a “sterile war", that is such act of military state violence against the other that is inconsequential for the self. In other words, the seductive appeal of the (...)
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  42. Emmanuel Alloa (2012). The Inorganic Community. Hypotheses on Literary Communism in Novalis, Benjamin and Blanchot. Boundary2. An International Journal of Literature and Culture 39 (3):75-95.score: 22.0
    If literary avant-garde journals and their communities have been, in the twentieth century, a space for creating, if not sustaining, major political utopias, it should help explain why this “literary communism,” as Jean-Luc Nancy called it, is not a weakened or substitutional form of politics. No myth without narration, no implementation without an instrumentation, no organic unity without a political organ voicing its claim, in short: no organicity without an organon. But can there be a (literary) community that does not (...)
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  43. Adam Kotsko (2008). On Agamben's Use of Benjamin's “Critique of Violence”. Telos 2008 (145):119-129.score: 22.0
    In Homo Sacer,1 Giorgio Agamben devotes a crucial “threshold” to an extremely compressed reading of Walter Benjamin's “Critique of Violence,”2 a threshold that provides the transition between his elaboration of the logic of sovereignty and his analysis of the concept of homo sacer or “bare life.” That Benjamin's essay should play such a crucial role in Agamben's text is unsurprising. First, Benjamin is arguably the most important authority for Agamben's intellectual project as a whole, rivaled only by (...)
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  44. Albert C. Skaggs (1985). Today's Codes Mirror Credo of Benjamin Harris. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 1 (1):37 – 41.score: 22.0
    Major codes adopted by newspapers in recent years show marked similarities to the statements of purpose found in the first (and only) issue of Benjamin Harris? Public Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick, published in Boston in 1690. This essay compares the front page statement by Harris with seven other statements about the role or responsibility of the press: The Associated Press Managing Editors Association ?Code of Ethics for Newspapers and their Staffs''; the 1947 report of the Commission on Freedom (...)
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  45. Clarence W. Joldersma (2014). Benjamin's Angel of History and the Work of Mourning in Ethical Remembrance: Understanding the Effect of W.G. Sebald's Novels in the Classroom. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (2):135-147.score: 22.0
    The paper develops a conceptual framework for understanding the work of ethical remembrance in the classroom. Using David Hansen’s recent example of using Sebald’s novels in his classroom to do the work or remembrance, the paper argues that the effect of Sebald’s novels is best understood using Walter Benjamin’s figure of the angel of history. That figure indicates a view of history that goes beyond the progression of everyday time, to one called remembrance. The paper suggests that the work (...)
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  46. Brendan Moran (2014). Exception, Decision and Philosophic Politics Benjamin and the Extreme. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (2):145-170.score: 22.0
    Walter Benjamin’s writings are often read in terms of their emphasis on undecidability. This article focuses on Benjamin’s view of decision as a philosophic capacity to suspend recognizable myth. Myth is recognizable as closure. Myth becomes recognizable as myth when exceptions and extremes arise in relation to it. Without necessarily following the specific exception or extreme (which may itself be mythic), philosophy is a politics that is attuned to the capacity of an exception or extreme to perform the (...)
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  47. Nicholas Adams (1998). Walter Benjamin on Liturgical Embodiment. Telos 1998 (113):113-134.score: 22.0
    An unusual aspect of Walter Benjamin's work is the provocative way he uses theology in tackling “theoretical” questions. While it is difficult to write about Benjamin without dealing with his relation to the Jewish tradition, in studies of his work surprisingly little attention is paid to theological questions. This is not to ignore the many accounts of Benjamin's interest in the Kabbala, his “theological” writings on language, or his messianic imagery. However, whereas for Benjamin theological concerns (...)
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  48. Bryan Garsten (2010). Religion and the Case Against Ancient Liberty: Benjamin Constant's Other Lectures. Political Theory 38 (1):4 - 33.score: 22.0
    Benjamin Constant's famous lecture comparing ancient and modern liberty can be better understood if it is read alongside a set of unpublished lectures on ancient religion that he delivered one year earlier. Those lectures suggest that Constant's commitment to modern liberty was based in part on his deep anxieties about religious freedom, and that he valued religious freedom because he thought the "religious sentiment" was an important manifestation of a natural human capacity for self-development. In putting religion and self-development (...)
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  49. José María Seco Martínez & Rafael Rodríguez Prieto (2004). El regreso de la educación cívica. Benjamin R. Barber Y la democracia fuerte. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 38:115-140.score: 22.0
    La educación cívica se encuentra en la misma base de la democracia . T odo sistema democrático que prescinda de esta necesidad acabará haciendo de s v anecerse la racionalidad democrática de sus instituciones. La democracia liberal es un buen ejemplo de este debilitamiento pr o g res i v o de las estructuras democráticas. Benjamin R. Barber no tarda en referirse a ella como "democracia débil". La democracia carece de plenitud sin ciudadanos fo r mados cívicamente. Educación y (...)
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  50. Richard Wolin (1983). Walter Benjamin: The Story of a Friendship. Telos 1983 (58):219-227.score: 22.0
    The appearance of an English translation of Gershom Scholem's 1975 memoir of his lifelong friendship with Walter Benjamin cannot help but raise (or, re-raise) a variety of questions, both biographical and substantive, concerning Benjamin's celebrated oscillation between theological and materialist interests. Scholem's portrait of Benjamin is undoubtedly the most intimate testimony available concerning Benjamin's early development — his early affiliations with the German Youth Movement, his virulent antiwar sentiment, his fascination for anti-positivistic, speculative modes of thought, (...)
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