Search results for 'Owen Chadwick' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Owen Chadwick (1962). Patristic Greek A Patristic Greek Lexicon. Edited by G. W. H. Lampe. Fascicle 1 (Αβαραθρω). Pp. 1+288. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1961. Cloth, 84s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 12 (03):222-224.score: 240.0
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  2. Owen Chadwick (1999). Pius XII and the Persecution of the Jews. The Chesterton Review 25 (1/2):167-170.score: 240.0
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  3. G. E. L. Owen, Malcolm Schofield & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (1982/2006). Language and Logos: Studies in Ancient Greek Pgilosophy Presented to G.E.L. Owen. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    The essays in this volume were written to celebrate the sixtieth birthday of G. E. L. Owen, who by his essays and seminars on ancient Greek philosophy has made a contribution to its study that is second to none. The authors, from both sides of the Atlantic, include not only scholars whose main research interests lie in Greek philosophy, but others best known for their work in general philosophy. All are pupils or younger colleagues of Professor Owen who (...)
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  4. Robert Owen (1969). Robert Owen on Education. London, Cambridge U.P..score: 210.0
    Robert Owen was one of the most extraordinary Englishmen who ever lived and a great man. In a way his history is the history of the establishment of modern industrial Britain, reflected in the mind and activities of a very intelligent, capable and responsible industrialist, alive to the best social thought of his time. The organisation of industrial labour, factory legislation, education, trade unionism, co-operation, rationalism: he was passionately and ably engaged in all of them. His community at New (...)
     
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  5. G. E. L. Owen & M. Nussbaum (1988). Owen's Progress: Logic, Science, and Dialectic: Collected Papers in Greek Philosophy. Philosophical Review 97 (3):373-399.score: 180.0
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  6. S. G. Owen (1904). Owen's Persius and Juvenal.—A Rejoinder. The Classical Review 18 (02):125-131.score: 180.0
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  7. D. K. Menon, A. M. Owen & John D. Pickard (1999). Response From Menon, Owen and Pickard. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):44-46.score: 180.0
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  8. John M. Vella (2000). A History of the Popes, 1830-1914, by Owen Chadwick; and Acton and History, by Owen Chadwick. The Chesterton Review 26 (3):378-389.score: 150.0
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  9. Jay Newman (1984). CHADWICK, Owen, NewmanCHADWICK, Owen, Newman. Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 40 (3):379-379.score: 120.0
  10. Thomas Raymond Potvin (1990). CHADWICK, Owen, John-Henry NewmanCHADWICK, Owen, John-Henry Newman. Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 46 (3):414-415.score: 120.0
  11. David Owen (1999). Hume's Reason. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book explores Hume's account of reason and its role in human understanding, seen in the context of other notable accounts by philosophers of the early modern period. David Owen offers new interpretations of many of Hume's most famous arguments about induction, belief, scepticism, the passions, and moral distinctions.
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  12. David Owen (1994). Maturity and Modernity: Nietzsche, Weber, Foucault, and the Ambivalence of Reason. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Maturity and Modernity examines Nietzsche, Weber and Foucault as a distinct trajectory of critical thinking within modern thought which traces the emergence and development of genealogy in the form of imminent critique. David Owen clarifies the relationship between these thinkers and responds to Habermas' (and Dews') charge that these thinkers are nihilists and that their approach is philosophically incoherent and practically irresponsible by showing how genealogy as a practical activity is directed toward the achievements of human autonomy. The scope (...)
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  13. Henry Chadwick (2001). Augustine: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Augustine was arguably the greatest early Christian philosopher. His teachings had a profound effect on Medieval scholarship, Renaissance humanism, and the religious controversies of both the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation. Here, Henry Chadwick places Augustine in his philosophical and religious context and traces the history of his influence on Western thought, both within and beyond the Christian tradition. A handy account to one of the greatest religious thinkers, this Very Short Introduction is both a useful guide for the one (...)
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  14. David Owen (2007). Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality. McGill-Queen's University Press/Acumen.score: 60.0
    Combining philosophical acuity, psychological insight and a remarkably powerful prose style, On the Genealogy of Morality is a dazzling and brilliantly incisive attack on European morality. David Owen situates the Genealogy in the context of the development of Nietzsche's philosophy and offers readers a sophisticated and nuanced analysis of this great text. He provides a lucid account of Nietzsche’s reasons for adopting a “genealogical” investigation of our moral values as well as a detailed analysis of the Genealogy itself. Highlighting (...)
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  15. Henry Chadwick (2009). Augustine of Hippo: A Life. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The life and works of Augustine of Hippo (354-430) have shaped the development of the Christian Church, sparking controversy and influencing the ideas of theologians through subsequent centuries. His words are still frequently quoted in devotions throughout the global Church today. His key themes retain a striking contemporary relevance - what is the place of the Church in the world? What is the relation between nature and grace? -/- Augustine's intellectual development is recounted with clarity and warmth in this newly (...)
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  16. Ian Rory Owen (2007). Understanding the Ubiquity of the Intentionality of Consciousness in Commonsense and Psychotherapy. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (1):1-12.score: 60.0
    A formal and idealised understanding of intentionality as a mental process is a central topic within the classical Husserlian phenomenological analysis of consciousness. This paper does not define Husserl’s stance, because that has been achieved elsewhere (Kern, 1977, 1986, 1988; Kern & Marbach, 2001; Marbach, 1988, 1993, 2005; Owen, 2006; Zahavi, 2003). This paper shows how intentionality informs therapy theory and practice. Husserl’s ideas are taken to the psychotherapy relationship in order to explain what it means for consciousness to (...)
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  17. Henry Chadwick (1982). Augustine. In R. M. Hare, Jonathan Barnes & Henry Chadwick (eds.), Founders of Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Augustine was arguably the greatest early Christian philosopher. His teachings had a profound effect on Medieval scholarship, Renaissance humanism, and the religious controversies of both the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation. Here, Henry Chadwick places Augustine in his philosophical and religious context and traces the history of his influence on Western thought, both within and beyond the Christian tradition.
     
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  18. Henry Chadwick (1981). Boethius, the Consolations of Music, Logic, Theology, and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The Consolations of Philosophy by Boethius, whose English translators include King Alfred, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Queen Elizabeth I, ranks among the most remarkable books to be written by a prisoner awaiting the execution of a tyrannical death sentence. Its interpretation is bound up with his other writings on mathematics and music, on Aristotelian and propositional logic, and on central themes of Christian dogma. -/- Chadwick begins by tracing the career of Boethius, a Roman rising to high office under the (...)
     
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  19. G. E. R. Lloyd & G. E. L. Owen (eds.) (1978). Aristotle on Mind and the Senses: Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium Aristotelicum. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The Symposia Aristotelica were inaugurated at Oxford in 1957. They are conferences of select groups of Aristotelian scholars from the UK, USA and Europe, and are held every three years. In 1975 the meeting was held in Cambridge and was devoted to Aristotle's psychological treatises, the De anima and the Parva uaturalia. The members of the conference discussed some of the much debated problems of Aristotle's psychology and broached important new topics such as his ideas on imagination. Dr Lloyd and (...)
     
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  20. David Owen & Todd Stewart (2002). David Owens, Reason Without Freedom: The Problem of Epistemic Normativity Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (1):63-66.score: 60.0
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  21. Rachel Cohon & David Owen (1997). Hume on Representation, Reason and Motivation. Manuscrito 20:47-76.score: 30.0
  22. David Owen (2009). Hume and the Mechanics of Mind : Impressions, Ideas, and Association. In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Hume introduced important innovations concerning the theory of ideas. The two most important are the distinction between impressions and ideas, and the use he made of the principles of association in explaining mental phenomena. Hume divided the perceptions of the mind into two classes. The members of one class, impressions, he held to have a greater degree of force and vivacity than the members of the other class, ideas. He also supposed that ideas are causally dependent copies of impressions. And, (...)
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  23. Andrew Belsey & Ruth F. Chadwick (eds.) (1992). Ethical Issues in Journalism and the Media. Routledge.score: 30.0
    This book examines the ethical concepts which lie at the heart of journalism, including freedom, democracy, truth, objectivity, honesty and privacy.
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  24. Bert van den Brink & David Owen (eds.) (2007). Recognition and Power: Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    The topic of recognition has come to occupy a central place in contemporary debates in social and political theory. Rooted in Hegel's work, developed by George Herbert Mead and Charles Taylor, it has been given renewed expression in the recent program for Critical Theory developed by Axel Honneth in his book The Struggle for Recognition. Honneth's research program offers an empirically insightful way of reflecting on emancipatory struggles for greater justice and a powerful theoretical tool for generating a conception of (...)
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  25. Ruth Chadwick, Professional Ethics and the 'Good' of Science.score: 30.0
    Proposals for an ethical code for scientists raise questions about the usefulness of the framework of professional ethics for debating relevant issues surrounding ethics and science. Is science a profession and if so should its professional ethic be self-derived or subject to external input? What needs to be addressed is the nature of the 'good' that science promotes. Explanations of science as a public good in terms of knowledge and diversity are possibilities, but science's answer to the basic philosophical question (...)
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  26. G. E. L. Owen (1965). Inherence. Phronesis 10 (1):97 - 105.score: 30.0
  27. Steven Laureys, Adrian M. Owen & Nicholas D. Schiff (2004). Brain Function in Coma, Vegetative State, and Related Disorders. Lancet Neurology 3:537-546.score: 30.0
  28. G. E. L. Owen (1960). Eleatic Questions. Classical Quarterly 10 (1-2):84-.score: 30.0
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  29. Peter Chadwick (2001). Psychotic Consciousness. International Journal of Social Psychiatry 47 (1):52-62.score: 30.0
  30. J. A. Chadwick (1927). Logical Constants. Mind 36 (141):1-11.score: 30.0
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  31. Marna A. Owen (2009). Animal Rights: Noble Cause or Needless Effort? Twenty-First Century Books.score: 30.0
    Discusses the history of animal rights; laws about how animals are treated; moral issues involved in using animals in such fields as medical research and ...
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  32. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys, Dietsje Jolles & John D. Pickard (2007). Response to Comments on "Detecting Awareness in the Vegetative State". Science 315 (5816).score: 30.0
  33. David Owen (2007). Locke on Judgment. In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Locke usually uses the term “judgment” in a rather narrow but not unusual sense, as referring to the faculty that produces probable opinion or assent.2 His account is explicitly developed in analogy with knowledge, and like knowledge, it is developed in terms of the relation various ideas bear to one another. Whereas knowledge is the perception of the agreement or disagreement of any of our ideas, judgment is the presumption of their agreement or disagreement. Intuitive knowledge is the immediate perception (...)
     
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  34. David S. Owen (2007). Towards a Critical Theory of Whiteness. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (2):203-222.score: 30.0
    In this article I argue that a critical theory of whiteness is necessary, though not sufficient, to the formulation of an adequate explanatory account of the mechanisms of racial oppression in the modern world. In order to explain how whiteness underwrites systems of racial oppression and how it is reproduced, the central functional properties of whiteness are identified. I propose that understanding whiteness as a structuring property of racialized social systems best explains these functional properties. Given the variety of conceptions (...)
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  35. David Owen (2001). Deliberative Democracy: On James Bohman's Public Deliberation: Pluralism, Complexity and Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (5).score: 30.0
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  36. David Owen (2003). Locke and Hume on Belief, Judgment and Assent. Topoi 22 (1):15-28.score: 30.0
    Hume's account of belief has been much reviled, especially considered as an account of what it is to assent to or judge a proposition to be true. In fact, given that he thinks that thoughts about existence can be composed of a single idea, and that relations are just complex ideas, it might be wondered whether he has an account of judgment at all. Nonetheless, Hume was extremely proud of his account of belief, discussing it at length in the Abstract, (...)
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  37. Ruth F. Chadwick (1989). The Market for Bodily Parts: Kant and Duties to Oneself. Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):129-140.score: 30.0
    The demand for bodily parts such as organs is increasing, and individuals in certain circumstances are responding by offering parts of their bodies for sale. Is there anything wrong in this? Kant had arguments to suggest that there is, namely that we have duties towards our own bodies, among which is the duty not to sell parts of them. Kant's reasons for holding this view are examined, and found to depend on a notion of what is intrinsically degrading. Rom Harré's (...)
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  38. Ruth Chadwick (2011). Enhancements: Improvements for Whom? Bioethics 25 (4):ii-ii.score: 30.0
  39. Ian R. Owen (2006). Psychotherapy and Phenomenology: On Freud, Husserl and Heidegger. Lincoln: iUniverse.score: 30.0
  40. David Owen, Scepticism with Regard to Reason.score: 30.0
    Until recently, philosophical scholarship has not been kind to Hume’s arguments in “Of scepticism with regard to reason” (A Treatise of Human Nature, 1.4.1). [1] Reid gives the negative arguments a pretty rough ride, though in the end he agrees with Hume’s conclusion that reason cannot be defended by reason.[2] Stove’s comment that the argument is “not merely defective, but one of the worst arguments ever to impose itself on a man of genius” (Stove 1973), while extreme, is not untypical. (...)
     
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  41. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys & John D. Pickard (2007). Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Covert Awareness in the Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 64 (8):1098-1102.score: 30.0
  42. Ruth Chadwick (2010). Crisis? What Crisis? Bioethics 24 (4):ii-ii.score: 30.0
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  43. Samantha Ashenden & David Owen (eds.) (1999). Foucault Contra Habermas: Recasting the Dialogue Between Genealogy and Critical Theory. Sage.score: 30.0
    Foucault contra Habermas is an incisive examination of, and a comprehensive introduction to, the debate between Foucault and Habermas over the meaning of enlightenment and modernity. It reprises the key issues in the argument between critical theory and genealogy and is organised around three complementary themes: defining the context of the debate; examining the theoretical and conceptual tools used; and discussing the implications for politics and criticism. In a detailed reply to Habermas' Philosophical Discourse of Modernity, this volume explains the (...)
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  44. David Owen (1987). Hume Versus Price on Miracles and Prior Probabilities: Testimony and the Bayesian Calculation. Philosophical Quarterly 37 (147):187-202.score: 30.0
    Hume’s celebrated argument concerning miracles, and an 18th century criticism of it put forward by Richard Price, is here interpreted in terms of the modern controversy over the base-rate fallacy. When considering to what degree we should trust a witness, should we or should we not take into account the prior probability of the event reported? The reliability of the witness (’Pr’(says e/e)) is distinguished from the credibility of the testimony (’Pr’(e/says e)), and it is argued that Hume, as a (...)
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  45. J. A. Chadwick (1928). Singular Propositions. Mind 37 (148):471-484.score: 30.0
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  46. David Owen (2002). Equality, Democracy, and Self-Respect: Reflections on Nietzsche's Agonal Perfectionism. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 24 (1):113-131.score: 30.0
  47. G. E. L. Owen (1966). Plato and Parmenides on the Timeless Present. The Monist 50 (3):317-340.score: 30.0
  48. Ruth Chadwick & Mairi Levitt (1998). Genetic Technology: A Threat to Deafness. [REVIEW] Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (3):209-215.score: 30.0
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  49. G. E. L. Owen (1953). The Place of the Timaeus in Plato's Dialogues. Classical Quarterly 3 (1-2):79-.score: 30.0
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  50. Ruth Chadwick (2000). Novel, Natural, Nutritious: Towards a Philosophy of Food. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):193–208.score: 30.0
    The possibilities of genetic engineering, particularly as applied to human beings, have provoked considerable debate for over two decades, but more recently the focus of public concern, at least, has turned to genetically modified (GM) food. Food has occasionally caught the attention of philosophers (Telfer, 1996) and bioethicists (Mepham, 1996) but is now ripe for further attention in the light of the implications of GM for policy in health, economics and politics. Macer has identified opposing reactions to novel foods—to prefer (...)
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