103 found
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  1.  96
    Owen J. Flanagan (1992). Consciousness Reconsidered. MIT Press.
  2.  57
    Owen J. Flanagan (1984). The Science of the Mind. MIT Press.
    Consciousness emerges as the key topic in this second edition of Owen Flanagan's popular introduction to cognitive science and the philosophy of psychology....
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  3.  34
    Owen J. Flanagan (1991). Varieties of Moral Personality: Ethics and Psychological Realism. Harvard University Press.
  4.  4
    Owen Flanagan (2007). The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World. A Bradford Book.
    If consciousness is "the hard problem" in mind science -- explaining how the amazing private world of consciousness emerges from neuronal activity -- then "the really hard problem," writes Owen Flanagan in this provocative book, is explaining how meaning is possible in the material world. How can we make sense of the magic and mystery of life naturalistically, without an appeal to the supernatural? How do we say truthful and enchanting things about being human if we accept the fact that (...)
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  5.  45
    Owen J. Flanagan (2011). The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized. MIT Press.
    An Essay in Comparative Neurophilosophy -- Preface -- Introduction: Buddhism Naturalized -- The Bodhisattva's Brain -- The Colour of Happiness -- Buddhist Epistemology and Science -- Buddhism as a Natural Philosophy. Buddhist Persons -- Being No-self & Being Nice -- Virtue & Happiness -- Postscript: Cosmopolitanism and Comparative Philosophy.
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  6. Ned Block, Owen J. Flanagan & Guven Guzeldere (eds.) (1997). The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. MIT Press.
    " -- "New Scientist" Intended for anyone attempting to find their way through the large and confusingly interwoven philosophical literature on consciousness, ..
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  7.  5
    Owen Flanagan & Jing Hu (2011). Han Fei Zi's Philosophical Psychology: Human Nature, Scarcity, and the Neo‐Darwinian Consensus. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):293-316.
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  8. Timothy Lane & Owen Flanagan (forthcoming). Neuroexistentialism, Eudaimonics, and Positive Illusions. In Byron Kaldis (ed.), Mind and Society: Cognitive Science Meets the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. SYNTHESE Philosophy Library Studies in Epistemology, Logic, Methodology, & Philosophy of Science. Springer Science+Business
    There is a distinctive form of existential anxiety, neuroexistential anxiety, which derives from the way in which contemporary neuroscience provides copious amounts of evidence to underscore the Darwinian message—we are animals, nothing more. One response to this 21st century existentialism is to promote Eudaimonics, a version of ethical naturalism that is committed to promoting fruitful interaction between ethical inquiry and science, most notably psychology and neuroscience. We argue that philosophical reflection on human nature and social life reveals that while working (...)
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  9.  84
    Owen J. Flanagan (2003). The Problem of the Soul: Two Visions of Mind and How to Reconcile Them. Basic Books.
    Traditional ideas about the basic nature of humanity are under attack as never before. The very attributes that make us human--free will, the permanence of personal identity, the existence of the soul--are being undermined and threatened by the current revolution in the science of the mind. If the mind is the brain, and therefore a physical object subject to deterministic laws, how can we have free will? If most of our thoughts and impulses are unconscious, how can we be morally (...)
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  10. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
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  11.  16
    Brendan A. Maher, A. W. Young, Philip Gerrans, John Campbell, Kai Vogeley, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Owen Flanagan, Robert L. Woolfolk, Barry Smith & Joëlle Proust (1999). Cognitive Theories of Mental Illness. The Monist 82 (4).
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  12.  36
    Owen Flanagan & H. U. Jing (2011). Han Fei Zi's Philosophical Psychology: Human Nature, Scarcity, and the Neo-Darwinian Consensus. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):293-316.
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  13.  14
    Mark Greene, Kathryn Schill, Shoji Takahashi, Alison Bateman-House, Tom Beauchamp, Hilary Bok, Dorothy Cheney, Joseph Coyle, Terrence Deacon, Daniel Dennett, Peter Donovan, Owen Flanagan, Steven Goldman, Henry Greely, Lee Martin & Earl Miller (2005). Moral Issues of Human-Non-Human Primate Neural Grafting. Science 309 (5733):385-386.
    The scientific, ethical, and policy issues raised by research involving the engraftment of human neural stem cells into the brains of nonhuman primates are explored by an interdisciplinary working group in this Policy Forum. The authors consider the possibility that this research might alter the cognitive capacities of recipient great apes and monkeys, with potential significance for their moral status.
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  14.  33
    Owen Flanagan (2014). Buddhism and the Scientific Image: Reply to Critics. Zygon 49 (1):242-258.
    I provide a précis of The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized (), and then respond to three critics, Christian Coseru, Charles Goodman, and Bronwyn Finnigan.
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  15. Abrol Fairweather & Owen Flanagan (eds.) (2014). Naturalizing Epistemic Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    An epistemic virtue is a personal quality conducive to the discovery of truth, the avoidance of error, or some other intellectually valuable goal. Current work in epistemology is increasingly value-driven, but this volume presents the first collection of essays to explore whether virtue epistemology can also be naturalistic, in the philosophical definition meaning 'methodologically continuous with science'. The essays examine the empirical research in psychology on cognitive abilities and personal dispositions, meta-epistemic semantic accounts of virtue theoretic norms, the role of (...)
     
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  16. Owen J. Flanagan & Thomas W. Polger (1995). Zombies and the Function of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):313-21.
    Todd Moody’s Zombie Earth thought experiment is an attempt to show that ‘conscious inessentialism’ is false or in need of qualification. We defend conscious inessentialism against his criticisms, and argue that zombie thought experiments highlight the need to explain why consciousness evolved and what function(s) it serves. This is the hardest problem in consciousness studies.
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  17.  49
    Owen Flanagan & Kathryn Jackson (1987). Justice, Care, and Gender: The Kohlberg-Gilligan Debate Revisited. Ethics 97 (3):622-637.
  18. Owen Flanagan (1986). Admirable Immorality and Admirable Imperfection. Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):41-60.
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  19.  55
    Owen Flanagan (2006). Varieties of Naturalism. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press 430--452.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712242; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 430-452.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 451-452.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  20. Stefan Dolgert, Owen Flanagan, Eric Goodfield, Stuart Gray, Jing Hu, Murad Idris, Sungmoon Kim, Al Martinich, Abraham Melamed, Magid Shihade, David Slakter, Michael Stoil & Siwing Tsoi (2013). The State of Nature in Comparative Political Thought: Western and Non-Western Perspectives. Lexington Books.
    The State of Nature in Comparative Political Thought addresses non-Western conceptions of the “state of nature”, revealing how basic questions related to political thought are reflected in Chinese, Islamic, Indic, and other cultural contexts. It contributes to the burgeoning field of comparative political theory, and should be of interest to political theorists, regional specialists, students of globalization, as well as anyone interested in non-Western approaches to basic political questions.
     
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  21. Thomas W. Polger & Owen J. Flanagan, Explaining the Evolution of Consciousness: The Other Hard Problem.
    Recently some philosophers interested in consciousness have begun to turn their attention to the question of what evolutionary advantages, if any, being conscious might confer on an organism. The issue has been pressed in recent dicussions involving David Chalmers, Todd Moody, Owen Flanagan and Thomas Polger, Daniel Dennett, and others. The purpose of this essay is to consider some of the problems that face anyone who wants to give an evolutionary explanation of consciousness. We begin by framing the problem in (...)
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  22. Owen J. Flanagan (1994). Multiple Identity, Character Transformation, and Self-Reclamation. In George Graham & G. Lynn Stephens (eds.), Philosophical Psychopathology. MIT Press
  23.  68
    Owen Flanagan & Robert Anthony Williams (2010). What Does the Modularity of Morals Have to Do With Ethics? Four Moral Sprouts Plus or Minus a Few. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):430-453.
    Flanagan (1991) was the first contemporary philosopher to suggest that a modularity of morals hypothesis (MMH) was worth consideration by cognitive science. There is now a serious empirically informed proposal that moral competence is best explained in terms of moral modules-evolutionarily ancient, fast-acting, automatic reactions to particular sociomoral experiences (Haidt & Joseph, 2007). MMH fleshes out an idea nascent in Aristotle, Mencius, and Darwin. We discuss the evidence for MMH, specifically an ancient version, “Mencian Moral Modularity,” which claims four innate (...)
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  24. Owen Flanagan (2009). One Enchanted Being: Neuroexistentialism and Meaning. Zygon 44 (1):41-49.
    The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World is my attempt to explain whether and how existential meaning is possible in a material world, and how such meaning is best conceived naturalistically. Neuroexistentialism conceives of our predicament in accordance with Darwin plus neuroscience. The prospects for our kind of being-in-the-world are limited by our natures as smart but fully embodied short-lived animals. Many find this picture disenchanting, even depressing. I respond to four criticisms of my relentless upbeat naturalism: that (...)
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  25. Owen Flanagan (1991). Identity, Gender, and Strong Evaluation. Noûs 25 (2):198-200.
  26. Owen J. Flanagan (2000). Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind. Oxford University Press.
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature (...)
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  27. Owen J. Flanagan (1995). Deconstructing Dreams: The Spandrels of Sleep. Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):5-27.
  28.  58
    Owen Flanagan & Stephen Martin (2012). Science and the Modest Image of Epistemology. Human.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.
  29.  44
    Owen Flanagan (1990). Virtue and Ignorance. Journal of Philosophy 87 (8):420-428.
  30.  2
    Owen Flanagan (2016). Does Yoga Induce Metaphysical Hallucinations?: Interdisciplinarity at the Edge: Comments on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):952-958.
    Waking, Dreaming, Being is an unusual book in many ways. I mention two. First, in some ways it is a memoir. Few philosophers started as a child doing the sort of philosophy that they did as a grown-up. Evan did. Evan grew up in the intellectually fertile world of the Lindisfarne Association, the collaborative of scientists, artists, ecologists, and contemplatives founded by his father, William Irwin Thompson, a polymath, whom I had the pleasure of meeting in 2004 at the Crestone (...)
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  31.  6
    Owen Flanagan (1996). Ethics Naturalized: Ethics as Human Ecology. In L. May, Michael Friedman & A. Clark (eds.), Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. MIT Press 19--44.
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  32.  35
    Owen J. Flanagan Jr (1982). Virtue, Sex, and Gender: Some Philosophical Reflections on the Moral Psychology Debate. Ethics 92 (3):499-512.
  33. Owen J. Flanagan (1985). The Science of Mind. Ethics 96 (1):195-197.
     
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  34. Thomas W. Polger & Owen J. Flanagan (2002). Consciousness, Adaptation and Epiphenomenalism. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins
  35.  26
    Owen Flanagan (2000). Dreaming is Not an Adaptation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):936-939.
    The five papers in this issue all deal with the proper evolutionary function of sleep and dreams, these being different. To establish that some trait of character is an adaptation in the strict biological sense requires a story about the fitness enhancing function it served when it evolved and possibly a story of how the maintenance of this function is fitness enhancing now. My aim is to evaluate the proposals put forward in these papers. My conclusion is that although sleep (...)
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  36.  14
    Owen J. Flanagan (1997). Prospects for a Unified Theory of Consciousness or, What Dreams Are Made Of. In Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.), Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum 405--422.
  37. Owen Flanagan (1997). Conscious Inessentialism and the Epiphenomenalist Suspicion. In Ned Block, Owen Flanagan & Güven Güzeldere (eds.), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. The MIT Press
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  38.  28
    Owen Flanagan (2008). Moral Contagion and Logical Persuasion in the Mozi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):473-491.
  39.  23
    Owen J. Flanagan Jr (1982). Quinean Ethics. Ethics 93 (1):56-74.
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  40. Owen Flanagan, Paul Ricoeur, Leroy Rouner, Charles Taylor & Ernest Wallwork (1994). The Varieties of Moral Personality. Journal of Religious Ethics 22 (1):187-210.
    Views of the self may be plotted on a set of coordinates. On the axis that runs from fragmentation to unity, Rorty and Rorty's Freud champion the decentered self while Wallwork, Taylor, and Ricoeur argue for a sovereign, unified self. On the other axis, which runs from the disengaged, inward-turning self to the engaged and "sedimented" self, Wallwork, would be positioned near Rorty, defending self-creation against the narrative identity affirmed by Taylor and Ricoeur. Despite his skepticism concerning the communitarian agenda (...)
     
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  41. Owen Flanagan (2011). What Is It Like to Be an Addict? In Jeffrey Poland (ed.). MIT Press 269-292.
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  42.  55
    Owen Flanagan (1993). Book Review:The Malaise of Modernity. Charles Taylor. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (1):192-.
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  43.  23
    Owen Flanagan (1988). Pragmatism, Ethics, and Correspondence Truth: Response to Gibson and Quine. Ethics 98 (3):541-549.
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  44.  63
    Owen Flanagan, Virtuous Interdependency.
    At the end of the Nicomachean Ethics , the most in uential secular ethics text in the West (a set of lecture notes dutifully copied by Aristotle’s son Nicomachus), Aristotle wrote (or taught) that he would next take up politics, which in any case he ought to have done before the ethics. It would have been equally sensible if Aristotle had written (or taught) the Politics rst, that he might have had the reverse a erthought – namely, that he should (...)
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  45.  67
    Thomas W. Polger & Owen J. Flanagan (2001). A Decade of Teleofunctionalism: Lycan's Consciousness and Consciousness and Experience. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 11 (1):113-126.
  46. Owen J. Flanagan (1985). Consciousness, Naturalism and Nagel. Journal of Mind and Behavior 6 (3):373-90.
     
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  47.  22
    Owen Flanagan (1999). Multiplex Vs. Multiple Selves. The Monist 82 (4):645-657.
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  48.  1
    Owen Flanagan (1992). Varieties of Moral Personality. Ethics 103 (1):117-134.
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  49.  33
    Owen J. Flanagan (1995). Consciousness and the Natural Method. Neuropsychologia 33:1103-15.
  50.  53
    Owen J. Flanagan & T. McCreadie-Albright (1974). Malcolm and the Fallacy of Behaviorism. Philosophical Studies 26 (December):425-30.
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