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  1. Owen McLeod, Desert. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Owen Mcleod (2005). Daniel N. Robinson, Praise and Blame: Moral Realism and its Applications (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), Pp. XII + 225. Utilitas 17 (2):236-238.
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  3. Owen McLeod (2003). On the Comparative Element of Justice. In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), Desert and Justice. Oxford University Press. 123--123.
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  4. Louise Antony, Owen McLeod, Paul Benson, Diane T. Meyers, Lawrence Blum, Albert Mosley, John P. Christman, Jerome Neu, John Doris & Marina Oshana (2002). Manuscript Referees for The Journal of Ethics Volume 6: November 2001–August 2002. Journal of Ethics 6 (411).
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  5. Owen McLeod (2001). Just Plain "Ought''. Journal of Ethics 5 (4):269-291.
    Is there any sense to the idea of an ``ought''''that is not relative to any particularnormative framework? This ``ought'''' would not bea moral, prudential, legal, aesthetic, orreligious ``ought,'''' but rather an unqualified or just plain ``ought.'''' Thispaper (i) argues for the existence andusefulness of just plain ``ought''''; (ii) locatesthe concept of just plain ``ought'''' within amajor strand in the history of ethics (namely,the perennial attempt to demonstrate thatmorality and prudence are in harmony); and(iii) challenges David Copp''s recent attempt toshow that (...)
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  6. Owen McLeod (2001). Science, Religion, and Hyper-Humeanism. Philo 4 (1):68-81.
    According to hyper-Humeanism, the world of “fact” is utterly distinct from the realm of “value”-that is, the realm of morality and religion.This is a well-known philosophical position, and it more or less follows from some well-known philosophical doctrines (e.g., logical positivism, and neo-Wittgensteinianism), but its appeal is not limited to philosophers. Indeed, an acceptance of hyper-Humeanism seems to be at the root of Stephen Jay Gould’s recent defense of the thesis that science and religion are utterly distinct. Gould’s stated aim (...)
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  7. Owen McLeod (2000). Is There a Moral Obligation to Obey God? Philo 3 (1):20-31.
    A widespread view among theists is that there is a moral obligation to obey God’s commands. In this paper, four arguments for this view are considered: the argument from beneficence; the argument from property rights; the argument from justice; and the argument from omnipotence and moral perfection. It is argued that none of these arguments succeeds in showing that there is a moral obligation to obey God’s commands. The paper concludes with the suggestion that there might be, nevertheless, weighty and (...)
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  8. Owen McLeod (2000). What is Sidgwick's Dualism of Practical Reason? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):273–290.
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  9. Owen McLeod (1999). Ethical Norms, Particular Cases James D. Wallace Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1996, Xi + 171 Pp., $27.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (02):433-.
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  10. Owen Mcleod (1999). Ethical Norms, Particular Cases. Dialogue 38 (2):433-434.
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  11. Owen Mcleod (1999). 2t. Desert and Institutions. In Louis P. Pojman & Owen McLeod (eds.), What Do We Deserve?: A Reader on Justice and Desert. Oxford University Press. 186.
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  12. Louis P. Pojman & Owen McLeod (eds.) (1999). What Do We Deserve?: A Reader on Justice and Desert. Oxford University Press.
    The concept of desert, which once enjoyed a central place in political and ethical theory, has been relegated to the margins of much of contemporary theory, if not excluded altogether. Recently a renewed interest in the topic has emerged, and several philosophers have argued that the notion merits a more central place in political and ethical theory. Some of these philosophers contend that justice exists to the extent that people receive exactly what they deserve, while others argue that desert should (...)
     
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  13. Owen Mcleod (1998). Review: Justice as Fittingness. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 17 (1):61 - 75.
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  14. William Aiken, Sander Lee, Timo Airaksinen, Owen McLeod, Paul Allen Iii, Marcia Moen, Mahlon W. Barnes, Jan Narveson, Raymond Belliotti & Lisa Newton (1997). The Journal of Value Inquiry Relies on a Raft of Referees to Review Submis-Sions. The Reports of the Referees Call for Considerable Expertise and Careful Judgment. Referees Generally Write Several Reports Annually. Many Referees Have Gone Well Beyond Their Initial Allotments. All Have Done a Sterling Job. We Thank Them and Acknowledge Their Important Work Here. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 31:595-595.
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  15. Owen McLeod (1996). Desert and Wages. Utilitas 8 (2):205-221.
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  16. Owen McLeod (1995). Aristotle's Method. History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (1):1 - 18.