10 found
Sort by:
  1. Richard A. Burgess, Michael Davis, Marilyn A. Dyrud, Joseph R. Herkert, Rachelle D. Hollander, Lisa Newton, Michael S. Pritchard & P. Aarne Vesilind (2013). Engineering Ethics: Looking Back, Looking Forward. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1395-1404.
    The eight pieces constituting this Meeting Report are summaries of presentations made during a panel session at the 2011 Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE) annual meeting held between March 3rd and 6th in Cincinnati. Lisa Newton organized the session and served as chair. The panel of eight consisted both of pioneers in the field and more recent arrivals. It covered a range of topics from how the field has developed to where it should be going, from identification of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. P. Aarne Vesilind (2010). A Benign Invasion Response. Teaching Ethics 10 (2):91-94.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. P. Aarne Vesilind (2002). Vestal Virgins and Engineering Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):92-101.
    : Professional engineers are bound by their code of ethics to place paramount the health, safety, and welfare of the public. If the "public" includes future people, then the engineer is also morally responsible for not destroying the supporting environment that will make future generations possible. In this essay I suggest that the present engineering codes of ethics are inadequate in addressing the problem of maintaining environmental quality. Engineers can, while staying well within the bounds of the present codes of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. P. Aarne Vesilind (2001). Commentary On: “The Greening of Engineers: A Cross-Cultural Experience”. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):145-146.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. P. Aarne Vesilind (1999). The Good Engineer. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):437-442.
    So why be a good engineer? There are basically three reasons: 1) possible detection and the harm that dishonorable acts might cause, 2) a common responsibility to the professional engineering community, and 3) a negative impact on one’s own integrity when one behaves badly. But what if, in the face of these arguments, one is still not convinced? I must admit that there appears to be no knock-down ethical argument available to change the mind of a person set on behaving (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lauren Bartlett, P. Aarne Vesilind & P. Aarne Vesilind (1998). Expediency and Human Health: The Regulation of Environmental Chromium. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):191-201.
    The complexity of chromium chemistry makes it an ideal example of how the Principle of Expediency, first articulated by sanitary pioneer Earle Phelps, can be used in a standard setting. Expediency, defined by Phelps as “the attempt to reduce the numerical measure of probable harm, or the logical measure of existing hazard, to the lowest level that is practicable and feasible within the limitations of financial resources and engineering skill”, can take on negative connotations unless subject to ethical guidance. In (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. P. Aarne Vesilind (1998). Engineering, Ethics, and the Environment. Cambridge University Press.
    Engineering is 'the people-serving profession'. The work of engineers involves interaction with clients, other engineers, and the public at large. More than any other profession, their work also directly involves and affects the environment. This book makes the case that engineers have special professional obligations to protect and enhance the environment, and the authors - one, an engineer and the other, a philosopher - seek to provide an ethical basis for these obligations. In exploring these ethical issues, the authors aim (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. P. Aarne Vesilind (1996). There is No Such Thing as Environmental Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (3):307-318.
    Engineers and scientists, whose professional responsibilities often influence the natural environment, have sought to develop an environmental ethic that will be in tune with their attitudes toward the non-human environment, and that will assist them in decision making regarding questions of environmental quality. In this paper the classical traditions in normative ethics are explored in an attempt to formulate such an environmental ethic. I conclude, however, that because the discipline of ethics is directed at person-person interactions, ethics as a scholarly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. P. Aarne Vesilind, Richard J. Ellis & Lewis Ricci (1979). Comment. Environmental Ethics 1 (4):379-380.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation