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  1. P. E. Griffiths, Philosophy of Science, Vol. 61, No. 2 (Jun., 1994), 2o6-227.
    In this paper I assume that the micmstruccurzml view 0f species is fundamentally mistaken. Instead, I adopt thc historical view 0f species dcvclcpcd by M. Ghisclin (l974a,b), D. Hull (1976, l9?S, 1984) and 0thcrs, and thc particular version develope/d in the, writings 0f cladistlc systcmatists. Species are defined in terms of their common ancestry rather than their common intrinsic properties. (For 2. general philosophical treat-.
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  2. Eduoard Machery & P. E. Griffiths, Innateness, Canalization, and 'Biologicising the Mind'.
    This paper examines and rejects the claim that ‘innateness is canalization’. Waddington’s concept of canalization is distinguished from the narrower concept of environmental canalization with which it is often confused. Evidence is presented that the concept of environmental canalization is not an accurate analysis of the existing concept of innateness. The strategy of ‘biologicizing the mind’ by treating psychological or behavioral traits as if they were environmentally canalized physiological traits is criticized using data from developmental psychobiology. It is concluded that (...)
     
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  3. P. E. Griffiths, P∨~P.
    Pv~P: Cambridge Journal of Undergraduate Philosophy, Issue 1, 1982.
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  4. P. E. Griffiths (2002). Review of Sober and Wilson 1998. [REVIEW] Mind 111:178-182.
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  5. R. Goode & P. E. Griffiths (1995). The Misuse of Sober's Selection for/Selection of Distinction. Biology and Philosophy 10 (1):99-108.
    Elliott Sober''s selection for/selection of distinction has been widely used to clarify the idea that some properties of organisms are side-effects of selection processes. It has also been used, however, to choose between different descriptions of an evolutionary product when assigning biological functions to that product. We suggest that there is a characteristic error in these uses of the distinction. Complementary descriptions of function are misrepresented as mutually excluding one another. This error arises from a failure to appreciate that selection (...)
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  6. P. E. Griffiths (1994). Cladistic Classification and Functional Explanation. Philosophy of Science 61 (2):206-227.
    I adopt a cladistic view of species, and explore the possibility that there exists an equally valuable cladistic view of organismic traits. This suggestion seems to run counter to the stress on functional views of biological traits in recent work in philosophy and psychology. I show how the tension between these two views can be defused with a multilevel view of biological explanation. Despite the attractions of this compromise, I conclude that we must reject it, and adopt an essentially cladistic (...)
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  7. P. E. Griffiths & R. D. Gray (1994). Developmental Systems and Evolutionary Explanation. Journal of Philosophy 91 (6):277-304.
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  8. P. E. Griffiths & R. D. Gray (1994). Replicators and Vehicles? Or Developmental Systems? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):623.
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  9. P. E. Griffiths (1991). Book Reviews : Alexander Rosenberg, Philosophy of Social Science. Westview, Boulder, CO, 1988. Pp. Xiv, 218, $35.00 (Cloth), $18.95 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):290-293.