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  1. Peter Morton (2013). Eunus: The Cowardly King. Classical Quarterly 63 (1):237-252.
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  2. Peter Morton (ed.) (2010). A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind, Second Edition: Readings with Commentary. Broadview Press.
    This expanded and revised second edition of Morton's A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind combines primary readings with detailed commentary. The book has two aims: to present the philosophy of mind from a historical perspective so that the theories in the field are seen to emerge in the process of solving problems with earlier theories; and to give the students access to the original source material together with commentaries that explain the technical terms and jargon, outline the argumentative (...)
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  3. Peter Morton (2009). (N.) McKeown The Invention of Ancient Slavery? Pp. 174. London: Duckworth, 2007. Paper, £12.99. ISBN: 978-0-7156-3185-. The Classical Review 59 (01):306-.
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  4. Professor Adam Morton (2004). Epistemic Virtues, Metavirtues, and Computational Complexity. Noûs 38 (3):481-502.
    I argue that considerations about computational complexity show that all finite agents need characteristics like those that have been called epistemic virtues. The necessity of these virtues follows in part from the nonexistence of shortcuts, or efficient ways of finding shortcuts, to cognitively expensive routines. It follows that agents must possess the capacities – metavirtues –of developing in advance the cognitive virtues they will need when time and memory are at a premium.
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  5. Peter Morton (1998). An Institutional Theory of Law: Keeping Law in its Place. Oxford University Press.
    Peter Morton provides in these pages a fundamental critique of the assumptions of positivist jurisprudence and also puts forth an attack on the foundationalism of contemporary legal philosophy. His prime concern is to distinguish between the different fields of law--penal, civil, and public--taking as his starting point a careful analysis of those institutions in a democracy wherein legal language and norms are in fact generated. Offering an original, coherent, and systematic exposition of law in today's society, Morton sheds new light (...)
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  6. Peter A. Morton (1996). A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind: Readings with Commentary. Broadview Press.
    A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind is designed both to provide a selection of core readings on the subject and to make those readings accessible by providing commentaries to guide the reader through initially intimidating material. Each commentary explains technical concepts and provides background on obscure arguments as they arise, setting them in the historical and intellectual milieu from which they emerged. The readings concentrate on providing the student with a solid grounding in the theories of representative figures (...)
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  7. P. Morton (1993). Supervenience and Computational Explanation in Vision Theory. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):86-99.
    According to Marr's theory of vision, computational processes of early vision rely for their success on certain "natural constraints" in the physical environment. I examine the implications of this feature of Marr's theory for the question whether psychological states supervene on neural states. It is reasonable to hold that Marr's theory is nonindividualistic in that, given the role of natural constraints, distinct computational theories of the same neural processes may be justified in different environments. But to avoid trivializing computational explanations, (...)
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  8. Peter Morton (1992). Jay L. Garfield and Murray Kiteley, Eds., Meaning and Truth: The Essential Readings in Modern Semantics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (1):23-25.
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