342 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Philip Pettit [325]P. Pettit [17]Phillip Pettit [4]Philip N. Pettit [1]
See also:
Profile: Philip Pettit (Princeton University, Australian National University)
  1. Philip Pettit (1997). Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first full-length presentation of a republican alternative to the liberal and communitarian theories that have dominated political philosophy in recent years. The latest addition to the acclaimed Oxford Political Theory series, Pettit's eloquent and compelling account opens with an examination of the traditional republican conception of freedom as non-domination, contrasting this with established negative and positive views of liberty. The first part of the book traces the rise and decline of this conception, displays its many attractions, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   126 citations  
  2.  16
    Philip Pettit (2014). Just Freedom: A Moral Compass for a Complex World. W. W. Norton & Company, Inc..
    Freedom, in Philip Pettit's provocative analysis, "requires more than just being left alone." In Just Freedom, a succint articulation of the republican philosophy for which he is renowned, Pettit builds a theory of universal freedom as nondenomination. Seen through this lens, even societies that consider themselves free may find their political arrangements lacking. Do those arrangements protect people's liberties equally? Are they subject to the equally shared control of those they protect? Do they allow the different peoples of the world (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  3.  40
    Philip Pettit (2012). On the People's Terms: A Republican Theory and Model of Democracy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: the republic, old and new; 1. Freedom as non-domination; 2. Social justice; 3. Political legitimacy; 4. Democratic influence; 5. Democratic control; Conclusion: the argument, in summary.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  4. Christian List & Philip Pettit (2002). Aggregating Sets of Judgments: An Impossibility Result. Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):89-110.
    Suppose that the members of a group each hold a rational set of judgments on some interconnected questions, and imagine that the group itself has to form a collective, rational set of judgments on those questions. How should it go about dealing with this task? We argue that the question raised is subject to a difficulty that has recently been noticed in discussion of the doctrinal paradox in jurisprudence. And we show that there is a general impossibility theorem that that (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   73 citations  
  5. Philip Pettit (2007). Responsibility Incorporated. Ethics 117 (2):171-201.
    The Herald of Free Enterprise, a ferry operating in the English Channel, sank on March 6, 1987, drowning nearly two hundred people. The official inquiry found that the company running the ferry was extremely sloppy, with poor routines of checking and management. “From top to bottom the body corporate was infected with the disease of sloppiness.”1 But the courts did not penalize anyone in what might seem to be an appropriate measure, failing to identify individuals in the company or on (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   40 citations  
  6.  53
    John McDowell & Philip Pettit (eds.) (1986). Subject, Thought, And Context. Clarendon Press.
  7.  76
    Philip Pettit (1993). The Common Mind. Oxford University Press.
    What makes human beings intentional and thinking subjects? How does their intentionality and thought connect with their social nature and their communal experience? How do the answers to these questions shape the assumptions which it is legitimate to make in social explanation and political evaluation? These are the broad-ranging issues which Pettit addresses in this novel study. The Common Mind argues for an original way of marking off thinking subjects, in particular human beings, from other intentional systems, natural and artificial. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   42 citations  
  8. Frank Jackson & Philip Pettit (1990). Program Explanation: A General Perspective. Analysis 50 (2):107-17.
    Some properties are causally relevant for a certain effect, others are not. In this paper we describe a problem for our understanding of this notion and then offer a solution in terms of the notion of a program explanation.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   65 citations  
  9. Philip Pettit & David Schweikard (2006). Joint Actions and Group Agents. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (1):18-39.
    University of Cologne, Germany Joint action and group agency have emerged as focuses of attention in recent social theory and philosophy but they have rarely been connected with one another. The argument of this article is that whereas joint action involves people acting together to achieve any sort of result, group agency requires them to act together for the achievement of one result in particular: the construction of a centre of attitude and agency that satisfies the usual constraints of consistency (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  10. Christian List & Philip Pettit (2011). Group Agency: The Possibilty, Design and Status of Corporate Agents. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Are companies, churches, and states genuine agents? Or are they just collections of individual agents that give a misleading impression of unity? Group Agency offers a new approach to that question and is relevant, therefore, in a range of fields from philosophy to law, politics, and the social sciences. Christian List and Philip Pettit take the line that there really are group or corporate agents, over and above the individual agents who compose them, and that a proper social science and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  11. J. J. C. Smart, Philip Pettit, Richard Sylvan & Jean Norman (eds.) (1987). Metaphysics and Morality: Essays in Honour of J.J.C. Smart. B. Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   44 citations  
  12. Philip Pettit (2001). Deliberative Democracy and the Discursive Dilemma. Noûs 35 (s1):268-299.
    Taken as a model for how groups should make collective judgments and decisions, the ideal of deliberative democracy is inherently ambiguous. Consider the idealised case where it is agreed on all sides that a certain conclusion should be endorsed if and only if certain premises are admitted. Does deliberative democracy recommend that members of the group debate the premises and then individually vote, in the light of that debate, on whether or not to support the conclusion? Or does it recommend (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  13.  88
    Christian List & Philip Pettit (2004). Aggregating Sets of Judgments: Two Impossibility Results Compared. Synthese 140 (1-2):207 - 235.
    The ``doctrinal paradox'' or ``discursive dilemma'' shows that propositionwise majority voting over the judgments held by multiple individuals on some interconnected propositions can lead to inconsistent collective judgments on these propositions. List and Pettit (2002) have proved that this paradox illustrates a more general impossibility theorem showing that there exists no aggregation procedure that generally produces consistent collective judgments and satisfies certain minimal conditions. Although the paradox and the theorem concern the aggregation of judgments rather than preferences, they invite comparison (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  14.  39
    Philip Pettit (2010). Groups with Minds of Their Own. In Alvin I. Goldman & Dennis Whitcomb (eds.), Social Epistemology: Essential Readings. Oxford University Press
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  15. Philip Pettit (2010). A Republican Law of Peoples. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (1):70-94.
    Assuming that states will remain a permanent feature of our world, what is the ideal that we should hold out for the international order? An attractive proposal is that those peoples that are already organized under non-dominating, representative states should pursue a twin goal: first, arrange things so that they each enjoy the republican ideal of freedom as non-domination in relation to one another and to other multi-national and international agencies; and second, do everything possible and productive to facilitate the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  16. Frank Jackson, Philip Pettit & Michael Smith (2000). Ethical Particularism and Patterns. In Brad Hooker & Margaret Olivia Little (eds.), Moral Particularism. Oxford University Press 79--99.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   26 citations  
  17.  55
    Philip Pettit (1995). The Cunning of Trust. Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (3):202–225.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   37 citations  
  18.  96
    Frank Jackson & Philip Pettit (1988). Functionalism and Broad Content. Mind 97 (July):318-400.
  19. Frank Jackson & Philip Pettit (1995). Moral Functionalism and Moral Motivation. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (178):20-40.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  20.  70
    Frank Jackson & Philip Pettit (1992). In Defense of Explanatory Ecumenicalism. Economics and Philosophy 8 (1):1--21.
    Many of the things that we try to explain, in both our common sense and our scientific engagement with the world, are capable of being explained more or less finely: that is, with greater or lesser attention to the detail of the producing mechanism. A natural assumption, pervasive if not always explicit, is that other things being equal, the more finegrained an explanation, the better. Thus, Jon Elster, who also thinks there are instrumental reasons for wanting a more fine-grained explanation, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   37 citations  
  21. Philip Pettit & Michael Smith (1996). Freedom in Belief and Desire. Journal of Philosophy 93 (9):429-449.
  22. Philip Pettit (2006). When to Defer to Majority Testimony – and When Not. Analysis 66 (291):179–187.
    How sensitive should you be to the testimony of others? You saw the car that caused an accident going through traffic lights on the red; or so you thought. Should you revise your belief on discovering that the majority of bystanders, equally well-equipped, equally well-positioned and equally impartial, reported that it went through on the green? Or take another case. You believe that intelligent design is the best explanation for the order of the living universe. Should you revise that belief (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  23.  84
    Philip Pettit & Michael Smith (1990). Backgrounding Desire. Philosophical Review 99 (4):565-592.
    Granted that desire is always present in the genesis of human action, is it something on the presence of which the agent always reflects? I may act on a belief without coming to recognize that I have the belief. Can I act on a desire without recognizing that I have the desire? In particular, can the desire have a motivational presence in my decision making, figuring in the background, as it were, without appearing in the content of my deliberation, in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  24.  50
    Philip Pettit (2002). Rules, Reasons, and Norms: Selected Essays. Clarendon Press.
    Philip Pettit has drawn together here a series of interconnected essays on three subjects to which he has made notable contributions. The first part of the book deals with the rule-following character of thought. The second discusses the many factors to which choice is rationally responsive - and by reference to which choice can be explained - consistently with being under the control of thought. The third examines the implications of this multiple sensitivity for the normative regulation of social affairs. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  25.  87
    P. Pettit (1991). Realism and Response-Dependence. Mind 100 (4):587-626.
  26. Christian List & Philip Pettit (2006). Group Agency and Supervenience. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (S1):85-105.
    Can groups be rational agents over and above their individual members? We argue that group agents are distinguished by their capacity to mimic the way in which individual agents act and that this capacity must 'supervene' on the group members' contributions. But what is the nature of this supervenience relation? Focusing on group judgments, we argue that, for a group to be rational, its judgment on a particular proposition cannot generally be a function of the members' individual judgments on that (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  27.  94
    Philip Pettit (2011). The Instability of Freedom as Noninterference: The Case of Isaiah Berlin. Ethics 121 (4):693-716.
  28.  20
    Philip Pettit (2002). Rules, Reasons, and Norms: Selected Essays. Clarendon Press.
    Pettit presents a selection of essays touching upon metaphysics, philosophical psychology, and the theory of rational regulation. The first part of the book discusses the rule-following character of thought. The second considers how choice can be responsive to different sorts of factors, while still being under the control of thought. The third examines the implications of this view of choice and rationality for the normative regulation of social behavior.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  29.  9
    Philip Pettit (ed.) (1986). Subject, Thought, And Context. NY: Clarendon Press.
  30. Frank Jackson & Philip Pettit (1998). A Problem for Expressivism. Analysis 58 (4):239–251.
    Expressivists hold that ethical sentences express attitudes. We argue that it is very hard for expressivists to give an account of the relevant sense of 'express' which has some plausibility and also delivers the kind of noncognitivist account of ethical sentences they affirm. Our argument draws on Locke's point that words are voluntary signs.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  31.  21
    Philip Pettit (2016). Broome on Reasoning and Rule-Following. Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3373-3384.
    John Broome’s Rationality Through Reasoning is a trail-blazing study of the nature of rationality, the nature of reasoning and the connection between the two. But it may be somewhat misleading in two respects. First, his theory of reasoning is consistent with the meta-propositional view that he rejects; it develops a broadly similar theory but in much greater detail. And while his discussion of rule-following helps to explain the role of rules in reasoning, it does not constitute a response to the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  29
    Bryce Huebner, Marc D. Hauser & Phillip Pettit (2011). How the Source, Inevitability and Means of Bringing About Harm Interact in Folk-Moral Judgments. Mind and Language 26 (2):210-233.
    Means-based harms are frequently seen as forbidden, even when they lead to a greater good. But, are there mitigating factors? Results from five experiments show that judgments about means-based harms are modulated by: 1) Pareto considerations (was the harmed person made worse off?), 2) the directness of physical contact, and 3) the source of the threat (e.g. mechanical, human, or natural). Pareto harms are more permissible than non-Pareto harms, Pareto harms requiring direct physical contact are less permissible than those that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  33.  43
    Philip Pettit (2004). Depoliticizing Democracy. Ratio Juris 17 (1):52-65.
    It is now widely accepted as an ideal that democracy should be as deliberative as possible. Democracy should not involve a tussle between different interest groups or lobbies in which the numbers matter more than the arguments. And it should not be a system in which the only arguments that matter are those that voters conduct in an attempt to determine where their private or sectional advantage lies. Democracy, it is said, should promote public deliberation among citizens and authorities as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  34. Philip Pettit (1990). The Reality of Rule-Following. Mind 99 (393):1-21.
  35.  11
    Marcia Baron, Philip Pettit & Michael Slote (2001). Three Methods of Ethics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):721-723.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  36.  10
    Philip Pettit (2009). Made with Words: Hobbes on Language, Mind, and Politics. Princeton University Press.
    He has an astonishing range, and in this book he expands it still further. More than a mere introduction, Made with Words offers a coherent and well-argued picture of most of the main components of Hobbes's wide-ranging philosophy.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  37.  65
    Christian List & Philip Pettit (2004). Aggregating Sets of Judgments: Two Impossibility Results Compared. Synthese 140 (1/2):207 - 235.
    The "doctrinal paradox" or "discursive dilemma" shows that propositionwise majority voting over the judgments held by multiple individuals on some interconnected propositions can lead to inconsistent collective judgments on these propositions. List and Pettit (2002) have proved that this paradox illustrates a more general impossibility theorem showing that there exists no aggregation procedure that generally produces consistent collective judgments and satisfies certain minimal conditions. Although the paradox and the theorem concern the aggregation of judgments rather than preferences, they invite comparison (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  38. Philip Pettit (2015). The Robust Demands of the Good: Ethics with Attachment, Virtue, and Respect. OUP Oxford.
    Philip Pettit offers a new insight into moral psychology. He shows that attachments such as love, and certain virtues such as honesty, require their characteristic behaviours not only as things actually are, but also in cases where things are different from how they actually are. He explores the implications of this idea for key moral issues.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. P. Pettit (1999). Republicanism (RK Fullinwider). Philosophical Books 40 (4):131-132.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  40.  92
    Philip Pettit (2003). Looks as Powers. Philosophical Issues 13 (1):221-52.
    Although they may differ on the reason why, many philosophers hold that it is a priori that an object is red if and only if it is such as to look red to normal observers in normal conditions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  41.  10
    Nicola Lacey, John Braithwaite & Philip Pettit (1991). Not Just Deserts: A Republican Theory of Criminal Justice. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):374.
    A new approach to sentencing Not Just Deserts inaugurates a radical shift in the research agenda of criminology. The authors attack currently fashionable retributivist theories of punishment, arguing that the criminal justice system is so integrated that sentencing policy has to be considered in the system-wide context. They offer a comprehensive theory of criminal justice which draws on a philosophical view of the good and the right, and which points the way to practical intervention in the real world of incremental (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  42. Philip Pettit, David Lefkowitz, Steven Wall, Mark Schroeder, Paula Casal & Rosalind Hursthouse (2007). 10. Evan Selinger and Robert Crease, Eds., The Philosophy of Expertise Evan Selinger and Robert Crease, Eds., The Philosophy of Expertise (Pp. 377-381). [REVIEW] In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  43.  23
    Phillip Pettit (2004). Hope and its Place in Mind. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (1):152--165.
    People may have open minds on whether a life-extending drug or technology is going to be developed before their sixties and may strongly desire that development. Do they therefore hope that it occurs? Do they hope for it in the substantive sense of “pinning their hopes” on the development? No, they do not. Hoping for a prospect in that sense certainly presupposes having an open mind on whether it will occur and having a desire for its occurrence. But, more crucially, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  44.  21
    Philip Pettit (2008). Trust, Reliance, and the Internet1. In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Analyse & Kritik. Cambridge University Press 161.
    Trusting someone in an intuitive, rich sense of the term involves not just relying on that person, but manifesting reliance on them in the expectation that this manifestation of reliance will increase their reason and motive to prove reliable. Can trust between people be formed on the basis of Internet contact alone? Forming the required expectation in regard to another person, and so trusting them on some matter, may be due to believing that they are trustworthy; to believing that they (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  45.  20
    Philip Pettit (1990). Virtus Normativa: Rational Choice Perspectives. Ethics 100 (4):725-755.
  46.  90
    Frank Jackson & Philip Pettit (1990). Causation and the Philosophy of Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:195-214.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  47.  10
    P. Pettit (2016). On the Peoples Terms: A Reply to Bellamy, Levy and Lovett. Political Theory 44 (5):697-706.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  47
    Philip Pettit (1999). A Theory of Normal and Ideal Conditions. Philosophical Studies 96 (1):21-44.
    It is a priori on many accounts of colour concepts that something is red if and only if it is such that it would look red to normal observers in normal circumstances: it is such that it would look red, as we can say, under normal conditions of observation. And as this sort of formula is widely applied to colour concepts, so similar schemas are commonly defended in relation to a variety of other concepts too. Not only are colour concepts (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  49.  57
    Christian List & Philip Pettit (2005). On the Many as One: A Reply to Kornhauser and Sager. Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (4):377–390.
    In a recent paper on ‘The Many as One’, Lewis A. Kornhauser and Lawrence G. Sager look at an issue that we take to be of great importance in political theory. How far should groups in public life try to speak with one voice, and act with one mind? How far should public groups try to display what Ronald Dworkin calls integrity? We do not expect the many on the market to be integrated in this sense. But should we expect (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  50.  45
    Philip Pettit & Michael Smith (2006). External Reasons. In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Mcdowell and His Critics. Blackwell Pub. 6--142.
1 — 50 / 342