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  1. P. R. Ferguson (2003). Information Giving in Clinical Trials: The Views of Medical Researchers. Bioethics 17 (1):101–111.
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  2. P. R. Ferguson (2002). Patients' Perceptions of Information Provided in Clinical Trials. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (1):45-48.
    Background: According to the Declaration of Helsinki, patients who take part in a clinical trial must be adequately informed about the trial's aims, methods, expected benefits, and potential risks. The declaration does not, however, elaborate on what “adequately informed” might amount to, in practice. Medical researchers and Local Research Ethics Committees attempt to ensure that the information which potential participants are given is pitched at an appropriate level, but few studies have considered whether the patients who take part in such (...)
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  3. P. R. Ferguson (1998). Causing Death or Allowing to Die? A Rejoinder to Randall's Comments. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):281-282.
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  4. P. R. Ferguson (1997). Causing Death or Allowing to Die? Developments in the Law. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):368-372.
    Several cases which have been considered by the courts in recent years have highlighted the legal dilemmas facing doctors whose decisions result in the ending of a patient's life. This paper considers the case of Dr Cox, who was convicted of attempting to murder one of his patients, and explores the roles of motive, diminished responsibility and consent in cases of "mercy killing". The Cox decision is compared to that of Tony Bland and Janet Johnstone, in which the patients were (...)
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