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  1. P. S. Eardley (2008). Historical Dictionary of Medieval Philosophy and Theology (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 636-637.
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  2. P. S. Eardley (2006). Conceptions of Happiness and Human Destiny in the Late Thirteenth Century. Vivarium 44 (s 2-3):276-304.
    Medieval theories of ethics tended on the whole to regard self-perfection as the goal of human life. However there was profound disagreement, particularly in the late thirteenth century, over how exactly this was to be understood. Intellectualists such as Aquinas famously argued that human perfection lay primarily in coming to know the essence of God in the next life. Voluntarists such as the Franciscan John Peckham, by contrast, argued that ultimate perfection was to be achieved in patria through the act (...)
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  3. P. S. Eardley (2006). The Foundations of Freedom in Later Medieval Philosophy: Giles of Rome and His Contemporaries. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):353-376.
    : This article explores the philosophical and theological context in which later medieval debates surrounding the foundations of freedom emerged. In particular, the article establishes that Aquinas's famous pupil Giles of Rome (1243/47-1316) was less indebted to St. Thomas himself on the question of human freedom than has commonly been supposed. Rather, his teachings on the will and human freedom owe more to such Franciscan thinkers as John of la Rochelle and Walter of Bruges. This interpretation challenges the received view, (...)
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  4. P. S. Eardley (2003). Thomas Aquinas and Giles of Rome on the Will. Review of Metaphysics 56 (4):835 - 862.
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