Search results for 'P. Valdes-Sosa' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Valdés-Sosa P. (2008). Analyzing Brain Oscillations with EEG/fMRI Fusion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 900.0
  2. Valdés-Sosa P. (2008). Alpha Phase Resetting and Event Related Potentials, the Controversy Continues. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 900.0
  3. Ernest Sosa (1964). The Analysis of 'Knowledge That P'. Analysis 25 (1):1 - 8.score: 360.0
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  4. Ernest Sosa (2011). Reflective Knowledge: Apt Belief and Reflective Knowledge, Volume II. OUP Oxford.score: 300.0
    Reflective Knowledge argues for a reflective virtue epistemology based on a kind of virtuous circularity that may be found explicitly or just below the surface in the epistemological writings of Descartes, Moore, and now Davidson, who on Sosa's reading also relies crucially on an assumption of virtuous circularity. Along the way various lines of objection are explored. In Part I Sosa considers historical alternatives to the view developed in Part II. He begins with G.E. Moore's legendary proof, and the epistemology (...)
     
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  5. B. Valdés, A. Catena & P. Marí-Beffa (2005). Automatic and Controlled Semantic Processing: A Masked Prime-Task Effect. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):278-295.score: 240.0
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  6. A. P. Martinich & E. David Sosa (eds.) (2008). A Companion to Analytic Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 240.0
    This volume is a vital resource for anyone interested in analytic philosophy.
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  7. D. Gil-Pérez, J. Guisasola, A. Moreno, A. Cachapuz, A. M. Pessoa de Carvalho, J. Martínez Torregrosa, J. Salinas, P. Valdés, E. González & A. Gene Duch (2002). Que entendemos por posições construtivistas na Educação em Ciência. Science and Education 11:557-571.score: 240.0
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  8. David Sosa & A. P. Martinich (eds.) (2001). Blackwell Companion to Analytic Philosophy. Blackwell.score: 240.0
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  9. Aloysius Martinich & David Sosa (eds.) (2001). Analytic Philosophy: An Anthology. Blackwell.score: 120.0
    P. Grice and P. F. Strawson. 45. Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man. (Wilfrid Sellars). 46. From The Blue and the Brown Books. (Ludwig Wittgenstein).
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  10. Ernest Sosa (1969). Propositional Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 20 (3):33 - 43.score: 120.0
    The received definition of knowledge (as true, evident belief) has recently been questioned by Edmund Gettier with an example whose principle is as follows. A proposition, p, is both evident to and accepted by someone S, who sees that its truth entails (would entail) (that either p is true or q is true). This last is thereby made evident to him, and he accepts it, but it happens to be true only because q is true, since p is in fact (...)
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  11. E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino (2001). Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):165-183.score: 87.0
    Continuous recordings of brain electrical activity were obtained from a group of 176 patients throughout surgical procedures using general anesthesia. Artifact-free data from the 19 electrodes of the International 10/20 System were subjected to quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (QEEG). Induction was variously accomplished with etomidate, propofol or thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained throughout the procedures by isoflurane, desflurane or sevoflurane (N = 68), total intravenous anesthesia using propofol (N = 49), or nitrous oxide plus narcotics (N = 59). A set (...)
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  12. E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino (2002). Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics - Volume 10, Number 2 (2001), Pages 165-183. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):138-138.score: 87.0
     
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  13. Tomas Bogardus (2013). Knowledge Under Threat. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):289-313.score: 36.0
    Many contemporary epistemologists hold that a subject S’s true belief that p counts as knowledge only if S’s belief that p is also, in some important sense, safe. I describe accounts of this safety condition from John Hawthorne, Duncan Pritchard, and Ernest Sosa. There have been three counterexamples to safety proposed in the recent literature, from Comesaña, Neta and Rohrbaugh, and Kelp. I explain why all three proposals fail: each moves fallaciously from the fact that S was at epistemic risk (...)
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  14. Martin Montminy (2013). Explaining Dubious Assertions. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):825-830.score: 36.0
    David Sosa argues that the knowledge account of assertion is unsatisfactory, because it cannot explain the oddness of what he calls dubious assertions. One such dubious assertion is of the form ‘P but I do not know whether I know that p.’ Matthew Benton has attempted to show how proponents of the knowledge account can explain what’s wrong this assertion. I show that Benton’s explanation is inadequate, and propose my own explanation of the oddness of this dubious assertion. I also (...)
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  15. David Pimentel, E. Garnick, A. Berkowitz, S. Jacobson, S. Napolitano, P. Black, S. Valdes-Cogliano, B. Vinzant, E. Hudes & S. Littman (1980). Environmental Quality and Natural Biota. BioScience 30 (11):750-755.score: 28.0
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  16. Marc Alspector-Kelly (2011). Why Safety Doesn't Save Closure. Synthese 183 (2):127-142.score: 24.0
    Knowledge closure is, roughly, the following claim: For every agent S and propositions P and Q, if S knows P, knows that P implies Q, and believes Q because it is so implied, then S knows Q. Almost every epistemologist believes that closure is true. Indeed, they often believe that it so obviously true that any theory implying its denial is thereby refuted. Some prominent epistemologists have nevertheless denied it, most famously Fred Dretske and Robert Nozick. There are closure advocates (...)
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  17. Juan Comesaña (2005). Unsafe Knowledge. Synthese 146 (3):395 - 404.score: 24.0
    Ernest Sosa has argued that if someone knows that p, then his belief that p is “safe”. and Timothy Williamson has agreed. In this paper I argue that safety, as defined by Sosa, is not a necessary condition on knowledge – that we can have unsafe knowledge. I present Sosa’s definition of safety and a counterexample to it as a necessary condition on knowledge. I also argue that Sosa’s most recent refinements to the notion of safety don’t help him to (...)
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  18. Krist Vaesen (2011). Knowledge Without Credit, Exhibit 4: Extended Cognition. [REVIEW] Synthese 181 (515):529.score: 24.0
    The Credit Theory of Knowledge (CTK)—as expressed by such figures as John Greco, Wayne Riggs, and Ernest Sosa—holds that knowing that p implies deserving epistemic credit for truly believing that p . Opponents have presented three sorts of counterexamples to CTK: S might know that p without deserving credit in cases of (1) innate knowledge (Lackey, Kvanvig); (2) testimonial knowledge (Lackey); or (3) perceptual knowledge (Pritchard). The arguments of Lackey, Kvanvig and Pritchard, however, are effective only in so far as (...)
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  19. Abrol Fairweather & Carlos Montemayor (forthcoming). &Quot;epistemic Dexterity: A Ramseyian Account of Agent Based Knowledge. In Naturalizing Epistemic Virtue (Cambridge University Press).score: 24.0
    “Epistemic Dexterity: A Ramseyian Account of Epistemic Virtue” by Abrol Fairweather & Carlos Montemayor: A modification of F.P. Ramsey’s (1927) success semantics supports a naturalized theory of epistemic virtue that includes motivational components (desires) and can potentially explain both epistemic reliability and responsibility with a single normative-explanatory principle. An “epistemic Ramsey success” will also provide a better account of the “because of” condition central to virtue-reliabilist accounts of knowledge from Greco, Sosa and Pritchard. Ramsey said that the truth condition of (...)
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  20. C. S. I. Jenkins (2011). Reflective Knowledge and Epistemic Circularity. Philosophical Papers 40 (3):305-325.score: 24.0
    Abstract This paper examines the kind of epistemic circularity which, according to Ernest Sosa, is unavoidably entailed whenever one has what he calls ?reflective? knowledge (that is, knowledge that p such that the knower reflectively endorses the reliability of the epistemic sources by which she came to her belief that p). I begin by describing the relevant kind of circularity and its role in Sosa's epistemology, en route presenting and resisting Sosa's arguments that this kind of circularity is not vicious. (...)
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  21. Yves Bouchard, Epistemic Closure in Context.score: 24.0
    The general principle of epistemic closure stipulates that epistemic properties are transmissible through logical means. According to this principle, an epistemic operator, say ε, should satisfy any valid scheme of inference, such as: if ε(p entails q), then ε(p) entails ε(q). The principle of epistemic closure under known entailment (ECKE), a particular instance of epistemic closure, has received a good deal of attention since the last thirty years or so. ECKE states that: if one knows that p entails q, and (...)
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  22. Peter Murphy (2005). Closure Failures for Safety. Philosophia 33 (1-4):331-334.score: 24.0
    Ernest Sosa and others have proposed a safety condition on knowledge: If S knows p, then in the nearest (non-actual) worlds in which S believes p, p is true.1 Colloquially, this is the idea that knowing requires not being easily mistaken. Here, I will argue that like another condition requiring a counterfactual relation between a subject’s belief and the world, viz. Robert Nozick’s sensitivity condition, safety leads, in certain cases, to the unacceptable result that knowledge is not closed under known (...)
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  23. Dani Rabinowitz, &Quot;the Safety Condition for Knowledge&Quot;. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    A number of epistemologists have defended a necessary condition for knowledge that has come to be labeled as the “safety” condition. Timothy Williamson, Duncan Pritchard, and Ernest Sosa are the foremost defenders of safety. According to these authors an agent S knows a true proposition P only if S could not easily have falsely believed P. Disagreement arises, however, with respect to how they capture the notion of a safe belief. -/- This article is a treatment of the different presentations (...)
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  24. Kelly James Clark & Michael Rea (eds.) (2012). Reason, Metaphysics, and Mind: New Essays on the Philosophy of Alvin Plantinga. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    In May 2010, philosophers, family and friends gathered at the University of Notre Dame to celebrate the career and retirement of Alvin Plantinga, widely recognized as one of the world's leading figures in metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophy of religion. Plantinga has earned particular respect within the community of Christian philosophers for the pivotal role that he played in the recent renewal and development of philosophy of religion and philosophical theology. Each of the essays in this volume engages with some (...)
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  25. Joseph Salerno, Truth-Tracking and the Problem of Reflective Knowledge.score: 24.0
    In “Reliabilism Leveled” Jonathan Vogel (2000) provides a strong case against epistemic theories that stress the importance of tracking/sensitivity conditions. A tracking/sensitivity condition is to be understood as some version of the following counterfactual: (T) ~p oÆ ~Bp (T) says that s would not believe p, if p were false. Among other things, tracking is supposed to express the external relation that explains why some justified true beliefs are not knowledge. Champions of the condition include Robert Nozick (1981) and, more (...)
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  26. S. Luper (2006). Restorative Rigging and the Safe Indication Account. Synthese 153 (1):161 - 170.score: 24.0
    Typical Gettieresque scenarios involve a subject, S, using a method, M, of believing something, p, where, normally, M is a reliable indicator of the truth of p, yet, in S’s circumstances, M is not reliable: M is deleteriously rigged. A different sort of scenario involves rigging that restores the reliability of a method M that is deleteriously rigged: M is restoratively rigged. Some theorists criticize (among others) the safe indication account of knowledge defended by Luper, Sosa, and Williamson on the (...)
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  27. Sven Ove Hansson (2009). A History of Theoria. Theoria 75 (1):2-27.score: 24.0
    Theoria , the international Swedish philosophy journal, was founded in 1935. Its contributors in the first 75 years include the major Swedish philosophers from this period and in addition a long list of international philosophers, including A. J. Ayer, C. D. Broad, Ernst Cassirer, Hector Neri Castañeda, Arthur C. Danto, Donald Davidson, Nelson Goodman, R. M. Hare, Carl G. Hempel, Jaakko Hintikka, Saul Kripke, Henry E. Kyburg, Keith Lehrer, Isaac Levi, David Lewis, Gerald MacCallum, Richard Montague, Otto Neurath, Arthur N. (...)
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  28. Clive Vernon Borst (1970). The Mind-Brain Identity Theory: A Collection of Papers. New York,St Martin's P..score: 24.0
    Mind body, not a pseudo-problem, by H. Feigl.--Is consciousness a brain process? by U. T. Place.--Sensations and brain processes, by J. J. C. Smart.--The nature of mind, by D. M. Armstrong.--Materialism as a scientific hypothesis, by U. T. Place.--Sensations and brain processes: a reply to J. J. C. Smart, by J. T. Stevenson.--Further remarks on sensations and brain processes, by J. J. C. Smart.--Smart on sensations, by K. Baier.--Brain processes and incorrigibility, by J. J. C. Smart.--Could mental states be brain (...)
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  29. Francisco Salto Alemany & Antonio Manuel Liz Gutiérrez (2004). Realismo e indeterminación cardinal. Laguna 15:177-194.score: 24.0
    En este trabajo se argumenta que no es posible contar objetos reales. Aunque a primera vista esta tesis pueda resultar desconcertante, o un simple ejercicio de «arte conceptual», las razones que la apoyan son fundadas y muy naturales. Se examinan algunas consecuencias importantes de dicha tesis y se ponen en conexión con diversos planteamientos de H. Putnam, P. Unger y E. Sosa.
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  30. Sören Halldén (ed.) (1973). Modality, Morality and Other Problems of Sense and Nonsense. Lund,Gleerup.score: 24.0
    Hintikka, J. Knowing how, knowing that, and knowing what: observations on their relation in Plato and other Greek philosophers.--Hedenius, I. The concept of punishment.--Marc-Wogau, K. On the concept of dialectial development in Marxism.--Ekelöf, P. O. Definitions and concept formation in the law.--Hermerén, G. The existence of aesthetic qualities.--Regnéll, H. Explanation in analytical philosophy.--Furberg, M. On questions and pseudo-problems.--Moritz, M. Imperative implication and conditional imperatives.--Sosa, E. Standard conditions.--Danielsson, S. On the strength of commitments.--Aqvist, L. The emotive theory of ethics in the (...)
     
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  31. Gayle B. Speck, Kieron P. OÕConnor, Frederick Aardema, Walter J. Perrig, Doris Eckstein, Berenice Valdes Conroy, A. Catena, P. Marı-Beffa, Michiel B. de Ruiter & R. Hans Phaf (2004). Katja Valli, Antti Revonsuo, Outi Pälkäs, Kamaran Hassan Ismahil, Karsan Jelal Ali, and Raija-Leena Punamäki. The. Consciousness and Cognition 13:655.score: 24.0
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  32. Arvid Båve (2013). Formulating Deflationism. Synthese 190 (15):3287-3305.score: 18.0
    I here argue for a particular formulation of truth-deflationism, namely, the propositionally quantified formula, (Q) “For all p, ${\langle \text{p}\rangle}$ is true iff p”. The main argument consists of an enumeration of the other (five) possible formulations and criticisms thereof. Notably, Horwich’s Minimal Theory is found objectionable in that it cannot be accepted by finite beings. Other formulations err in not providing non-questionbegging, sufficiently direct derivations of the T-schema instances. I end by defending (Q) against various objections. In particular, I (...)
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  33. Jacques Dubochet, Sheila Ommeh, Aidan Budd, Mtakai Vald Ngara, Isaac Njaci, Etienne P. de Villiers, Erin E. Gill, Fiona Sl Brinkman, John R. Speakman & Colin Selman (unknown). Insights & Perspectives. Bioessays 33:240 - 242.score: 8.0
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  34. Sheila Ommeh, Aidan Budd, Mtakai Vald Ngara, Isaac Njaci & Etienne P. de Villiers (2011). Basic Molecular Evolution Workshop–A Trans‐African Virtual Training Course. Bioessays 33 (4):243-247.score: 8.0
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