Search results for 'PAST-TENSE' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anita Mittwoch (2008). The English Resultative Perfect and its Relationship to the Experiential Perfect and the Simple Past Tense. Linguistics and Philosophy 31 (3):323-351.score: 240.0
    A sentence in the Resultative perfect licenses two inferences: (a) the occurrence of an event (b) the state caused by this event obtains at evaluation time. In this paper I show that this use of the perfect is subject to a large number of distributional restrictions that all serve to highlight the result inference at the expense of the event inference. Nevertheless, only the event inference determines the truth conditions of this use of the perfect, the result inference being a (...)
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  2. Mark S. Seidenberg & David C. Plaut (2014). Quasiregularity and Its Discontents: The Legacy of the Past Tense Debate. Cognitive Science 38 (6):1190-1228.score: 240.0
    Rumelhart and McClelland's chapter about learning the past tense created a degree of controversy extraordinary even in the adversarial culture of modern science. It also stimulated a vast amount of research that advanced the understanding of the past tense, inflectional morphology in English and other languages, the nature of linguistic representations, relations between language and other phenomena such as reading and object recognition, the properties of artificial neural networks, and other topics. We examine the impact of the Rumelhart and McClelland (...)
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  3. William Child (2006). Memory, Expression, and Past-Tense Self-Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):54–76.score: 180.0
    How should we understand our capacity to remember our past intentional states? And what can we learn from Wittgenstein's treatment of this topic? Three questions are considered. First, what is the relation between our past attitudes and our present beliefs about them? Realism about past attitudes is defended. Second, how should we understand Wittgenstein's view that self-ascriptions of past attitudes are a kind of "response" and that the "language-game" of reporting past attitudes is "the primary thing"? The epistemology and metaphysics (...)
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  4. J. L. Bermudez (2013). Immunity to Error Through Misidentification and Past-Tense Memory Judgements. Analysis 73 (2):211-220.score: 180.0
    Autobiographical memories typically give rise either to memory reports (“I remember going swimming”) or to first person past-tense judgements (“I went swimming”). This article focuses on first person past-tense judgements that are (epistemically) based on autobiographical memories. Some of these judgements have the IEM property of being immune to error through misidentification. This article offers an account of when and why first person past-tense judgements have the IEM property.
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  5. R. M. Hare (1979). Universal and Past-Tense Prescriptions: A Reply to Mr. Ibberson. Analysis 39 (4):161 - 165.score: 180.0
    Properly universal prescriptions (necessary in analysis of value-judgments) entail past-tense imperatives. does the unusability of the latter rule out the former? no, because there are many usable rules which entail past-tense imperatives. else we could not point to past breaches when teaching the rule, which remains the same throughout the teaching process, or punish for past breaches of the same rule which is still in force. similar problem about imperatives in other than the second person succumbs to kenny's (...)
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  6. Kim Plunkett & Patrick Juola (1999). A Connectionist Model of English Past Tense and Plural Morphology. Cognitive Science 23 (4):463-490.score: 180.0
    The acquisition of English noun and verb morphology is modeled using a single-system connectionist network. The network is trained to produce the plurals and past tense forms of a large corpus of monosyllabic English nouns and verbs. The developmental trajectory of network performance is analyzed in detail and is shown to mimic a number of important features of the acquisition of English noun and verb morphology in young children. These include an initial error-free period of performance on both nouns and (...)
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  7. Virginia A. Marchman (1997). Children's Frequency , Productivity Phonology, in the and English Past Tense : The Role of Neighborhood Structure. Cognitive Science 21 (3):283-304.score: 180.0
    The productive use of English past tense morphology in school-aged children (N= 74; 3 years, 8 months to 13 years, 5 months) is explored using on elicited production task. Errors represented 20% of the responses overall. Virtually all of the children demonstrated productivity with regular (e.g., good) and irregular patterns (zero-marking, e.g., sit + sit; vowel-change, e.g., ride -+ rid). Overall frequency of errors decreased with age, yet the tendency for certain types of irregularizations increased in the older groups. Analyses (...)
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  8. Steven Pinker & Michael T. Ullman (2002). The Past-Tense Debate The Past and Future of the Past Tense. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):456-463.score: 180.0
    What is the interaction between storage and computation in language processing? What is the psychological status of grammatical rules? What are the relative strengths of connectionist and symbolic models of cognition? How are the components of language implemented in the brain? The English past tense has served as an arena for debates on these issues. We defend the theory that irregular past-tense forms are stored in the lexicon, a division of declarative memory, whereas regular forms can be computed by (...)
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  9. Steven Pinker & Michael Ullman (2002). The Past and Future of the Past Tense. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):456-463.score: 180.0
    What is the interaction between storage and computation in language processing? What is the psychological status of grammatical rules? What are the relative strengths of connectionist and symbolic models of cognition? How are the components of language implemented in the brain? The English past tense has served as an arena for debates on these issues. We defend the theory that irregular past-tense forms are stored in the lexicon, a division of declarative memory, whereas regular forms can be computed by (...)
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  10. Steven Pinker & Michael T. Ullman (2002). The Past and Future of the Past Tense Debate. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):456-463.score: 180.0
    What is the interaction between storage and computation in language processing? What is the psychological status of grammatical rules? What are the relative strengths of connectionist and symbolic models of cognition? How are the components of language implemented in the brain? The English past tense has served as an arena for debates on these issues. We defend the theory that irregular past-tense forms are stored in the lexicon, a division of declarative memory, whereas regular forms can be computed by (...)
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  11. G. F. Marcus (1995). The Acquisition of the English Past Tense in Children and Multilayered Connectionist Networks. Cognition 56 (3):271-279.score: 180.0
    The apparent very close similarity between the learning of the past tense by Adam and the Plunkett and Marchman model is exaggerated by several misleading comparisons--including arbitrary, unexplained changes in how graphs were plotted. The model's development differs from Adam's in three important ways: Children show a U-shaped sequence of development which does not depend on abrupt changes in input; U-shaped development in the simulation occurs only after an abrupt change in training regimen. Children overregularize vowel-change verbs more than no-change (...)
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  12. S. Pinker & M. T. Ullman (2002). The Past-Tense Debate. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):456-463.score: 180.0
    What is the interaction between storage and computation in language processing? What is the psychological status of grammatical rules? What are the relative strengths of connectionist and symbolic models of cognition? How are the components of language implemented in the brain? The English past tense has served as an arena for debates on these issues. We defend the theory that irregular past-tense forms are stored in the lexicon, a division of declarative memory, whereas regular forms can be computed by (...)
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  13. K. Plunkett & V. A. Marchman (1996). Learning From a Connectionist Model of the Acquisition of the English Past Tense. Cognition 61 (3):299-308.score: 180.0
    Comments on G. Marcus' criticisms (see record 1996-24670-001) of K. Plunkett's and V. Marcham's (see record 1994-35650-001) connectionist account of the acquisition of the English past tense (verb morphology). The original model is reviewed. Graphing, overregularization, and other criticisms are addressed (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved).
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  14. Corien Bary & Emar Maier (2009). The Dynamics of Tense Under Attitudes: Anaphoricity and de Se Interpretation in the Backward Shifted Past. In Hattori et al (ed.), New Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. 146--160.score: 162.0
    Shows that both anaphoricity and egocentric de se binding play a crucial role in the interpretation of tense in discourse. Uses the English backwards shifted reading of the past tense in a mistaken time scenario to bring out the tension between these two features. Provides a suitable representational framework for the observed clash in the form of an extension of DRT in which updates of the common ground are accompanied by updates of each relevant agent's complex attitudinal state.
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  15. Seth Cable (2013). Beyond the Past, Present, and Future: Towards the Semantics of 'Graded Tense' in Gĩkũyũ. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 21 (3):219-276.score: 162.0
    In recent years, our understanding of how tense systems vary across languages has been greatly advanced by formal semantic study of languages exhibiting fewer tense categories than the three commonly found in European languages. However, it has also often been reported that languages can sometimes distinguish more than three tenses. Such languages appear to have ‘graded tense’ systems, where the tense morphology serves to track how far into the past or future a reported event occurs. This paper presents a formal (...)
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  16. William Marslen-Wilson & Lorraine K. Tyler (1998). Rules, Representations, and the English Past Tense. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (11):428-435.score: 150.0
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  17. Emily R. Cohen-Shikora & David A. Balota (2013). Past Tense Route Priming. Cognition 126 (3):397-404.score: 150.0
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  18. Virginia A. Marchman (1997). Children's Productivity in the English Past Tense: The Role of Frequency, Phonology, and Neighborhood Structure. Cognitive Science 21 (3):283-304.score: 150.0
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  19. Niels A. Taatgen & John R. Anderson (2002). Why Do Children Learn to Say “Broke”? A Model of Learning the Past Tense Without Feedback. Cognition 86 (2):123-155.score: 150.0
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  20. Chloe R. Marshall & Heather K. J. van der Lely (2006). A Challenge to Current Models of Past Tense Inflection: The Impact of Phonotactics. Cognition 100 (2):302-320.score: 150.0
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  21. James L. McClelland & Karalyn Patterson (2002). Rules or Connections in Past-Tense Inflections: What Does the Evidence Rule Out? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):465-472.score: 150.0
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  22. V. Merlin, M. Tataru, F. Valognes, K. Plunkett & P. Juola (1999). A Connectionist Model of English Past Tense and Plural Morphology-Acquiring Verb Morphology in Children and Connectionist Nets. Cognitive Science 23 (4):463-490.score: 150.0
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  23. Amit Almor (2002). Past Tense Learning. In M. Arbib (ed.), The Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. Mit Press. 848--851.score: 150.0
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  24. Shoba Bandi-Rao & Gregory L. Murphy (2007). The Role of Meaning in Past-Tense Inflection: Evidence From Polysemy and Denominal Derivation. Cognition 104 (1):150-162.score: 150.0
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  25. Dan Jackson Rodger M. Constandse & Garrison W. Cottrell (1996). Selective Attention in the Acquisition of the Past Tense. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 183.score: 150.0
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  26. Danielle E. Matthews & Anna L. Theakston (2006). Errors of Omission in English‐Speaking Children's Production of Plurals and the Past Tense: The Effects of Frequency, Phonology, and Competition. Cognitive Science 30 (6):1027-1052.score: 150.0
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  27. Bart Pattyn (2006). Knowledge in the Past Tense. Ethical Perspectives 13 (2):191-219.score: 150.0
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  28. Christopher Peacocke (2001). Understanding the Past Tense. In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormark (eds.), Time and Memory. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
     
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  29. Michael Ramscar (2003). The Past-Tense Debate: Exocentric Form Versus the Evidence. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):107-108.score: 150.0
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  30. Mark S. Seidenberg & Maggie Bruck (1990). Consistency Effects in the Generation of Past Tense Morphology. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):522-522.score: 150.0
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  31. John C. Street (2008). Middle Mongolian Past-Tense-" BA" in the" Secret History". Journal of the American Oriental Society 128 (3):399-422.score: 150.0
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  32. L. Tasmowskideryck (1985). Past Tense, Logic and Pedagogy. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 39 (155):375-387.score: 150.0
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  33. G. Westermann, V. Kovic & N. Ruh (2008). English Past Tense Inflection: Regular Vs. Irregular or Easy Vs. Hard. In. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. 739--744.score: 150.0
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  34. Gert Westermann & Nicolas Ruh (2009). Synthetic Brain Imaging of English Past Tense Inflection. In. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 1364--1369.score: 150.0
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  35. Robin Le Poidevin (2002). The Past, Present, and Future of the Debate About Tense. In , Questions of Time and Tense. Clarendon Press.score: 126.0
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  36. Mark Bernstein (1989). Fatalism, Tense, and Changing the Past. Philosophical Studies 56 (2):175 - 186.score: 120.0
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  37. William Lane Craig (2010). Taking Tense Seriously in Differentiating Past and Future. Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):451-456.score: 120.0
    Wes Morriston argues that even if we take an endless series of events to be merely potentially, rather than actually, infinite, still no distinction between a beginningless and an endless series of events has been established which is relevant to arguments against the metaphysical possibility of an actually infinite number of things: if a beginningless series is impossible, so is an endless series. The success of Morriston’s argument, however, comes to depend on rejecting the characterization of an endless series of (...)
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  38. Michael J. White (1984). The Necessity of the Past and Modal-Tense Logic Incompleteness. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 25 (1):59-71.score: 120.0
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  39. William Lane Craig (2010). Taking Tense Seriously in Differentiating Past and Future: A Response to Wes Morriston. Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):451.score: 120.0
     
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  40. C. X. Ling & M. Marinov (1993). Answering the Connectionist Challenge: A Symbolic Model of Learning the Past Tenses of English Verbs. Cognition 49 (3):235-290.score: 100.0
    Supporters of eliminative connectionism have argued for a pattern association-based explanation of language learning and language processing. They deny that explicit rules and symbolic representations play any role in language processing and cognition in general. Their argument is based to a large extent on two artificial neural network (ANN) models that are claimed to be able to learn the past tenses of English verbs (Rumelhart & McClelland, 1986, Parallel distributed processing, Vol. 2, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press; MacWhinney & Leinbach, 1991, (...)
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  41. Tim Stowell, What is the Meaning of the Present and Past Tenses?score: 96.0
    What is the meaning of the present and past tenses? The answer to this question depends on what objects these terms refer to. If the question is about the English tense morphemes present and past, we will get one answer; if it is about their Japanese or Russian counterparts, we will get another; and if it is about a semantic categories PRESENT and PAST attributed to the theory of Universal Grammar (UG), we will get still another. In this article, I (...)
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  42. W. P. M. Meyer-Viol & H. S. Jones (2011). Reference Time and the English Past Tenses. Linguistics and Philosophy 34 (3):223-256.score: 96.0
    We offer a formal account of the English past tenses. We see the perfect as having reference time at speech time and the preterite as having reference time at event time. We formalize four constraints on reference time, which we bundle together under the term ‘perspective’. Once these constraints are satisfied at the different reference times of the perfect and preterite, the contrasting functions of these tenses are explained. Thus we can account formally for the ‘definiteness effect’ and the ‘lifetime (...)
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  43. Michael Thomas & Annette Karmiloff-Smith (2002). Are Developmental Disorders Like Cases of Adult Brain Damage? Implications From Connectionist Modelling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):727-750.score: 90.0
    It is often assumed that similar domain-specific behavioural impairments found in cases of adult brain damage and developmental disorders correspond to similar underlying causes, and can serve as convergent evidence for the modular structure of the normal adult cognitive system. We argue that this correspondence is contingent on an unsupported assumption that atypical development can produce selective deficits while the rest of the system develops normally (Residual Normality), and that this assumption tends to bias data collection in the field. Based (...)
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  44. Giuliano Torrengo (2013). The Grounding Problem and Presentist Explanations. Synthese 190 (12):2047-2063.score: 74.0
    Opponents of presentism have often argued that the presentist has difficulty in accounting for what makes (presently) true past-tensed propositions (TptP) true in a way that is compatible with her metaphysical view of time and reality. The problem is quite general and concerns not only strong truth-maker principles, but also the requirement that truth be grounded in reality. In order to meet the challenge, presentists have proposed many peculiar present aspects of the world as grounds for truths concerning the past, (...)
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  45. Kyung-Sook Chung (2007). Spatial Deictic Tense and Evidentials in Korean. Natural Language Semantics 15 (3):187-219.score: 72.0
    This paper focuses on the Korean suffix -te, which has been variously analyzed as a marker of tense, aspect, tense–aspect, mood, mood–tense, or evidentiality. I argue against all of these approaches and propose instead that -te is a spatial deictic past tense, which triggers an evidential environment. It refers to a certain past time when the speaker either observed an event or some evidence of the event within his (her) perceptual field. Thus, the denotation of -te is ‘overlap’, not between (...)
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  46. K. Schulz (2014). Fake Tense in Conditional Sentences: A Modal Approach. Natural Language Semantics 22 (2):117-144.score: 72.0
    Many languages allow for “fake” uses of their past tense marker: the marker: can occur in certain contexts without conveying temporal pastness. Instead it appears to bear a modal meaning. Iatridou (Linguist Inq 31(2):231–270, 2000) has dubbed this phenomenon Fake Tense. Fake Tense is particularly common to conditional constructions. This paper analyzes Fake Tense in English conditional sentences as a certain kind of ambiguity: the past tense morphology can mark the presence of a temporal operator, but it can also signal (...)
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  47. Adam Albright & Bruce Hayes (2003). Rules Vs. Analogy in English Past Tenses: A Computational/Experimental Study. Cognition 90 (2):119-161.score: 72.0
    Are morphological patterns learned in the form of rules? Some models deny this, attributing all morphology to analogical mechanisms. The dual mechanism model (Pinker, S., & Prince, A. (1998). On language and connectionism: analysis of a parallel distributed processing model of language acquisition. Cognition, 28, 73-193) posits that speakers do internalize rules, but that these rules are few and cover only regular processes; the remaining patterns are attributed to analogy. This article advocates a third approach, which uses multiple stochastic rules (...)
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  48. Guillaume Thomas (forthcoming). Nominal Tense and Temporal Implicatures: Evidence From Mbyá. Natural Language Semantics:1-56.score: 72.0
    In this paper, I discuss the distribution and the interpretation of the temporal suffix -kue in Mbyá, a Guaraní language that is closely related to Paraguayan Guaraní. This suffix is attested both inside noun phrases and inside clauses. Interestingly, its nominal uses give rise to inferences that are unattested in its clausal uses. These inferences were first identified in Paraguayan Guaraní by Tonhauser (PhD thesis, 2006; Language 83:831–869, 2007), who called them the existence property and the change of state property. (...)
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  49. David Sanson, Once Present, Now Past.score: 66.0
    If reality is temporary, then reality changes, and if reality changes, the past has explanatory work to do, and it cannot do that work unless it is no longer real. This tells against the Moving Now Theory, the Growing Block Theory, and any form of Presentism that attempts to understand the past in terms of the present, including Tensed Properties Presentism and Tensed Facts Presentism. It tells in favor of a form Presentism that allows us to appeal to unreal past (...)
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  50. David Cockburn (1997). Other Times: Philosophical Perspectives on Past, Present, and Future. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    We view things from a certain position in time: in our language, thought, feelings and actions, we draw distinctions between what has happened, is happening, and will happen. Current approaches to this feature of our lives - those seen in disputes between tensed and tenseless theories, between realist and anti-realist treatments of past and future, and in accounts of historical knowledge - embody serious misunderstandings of the character of the issues; they misconstrue the relation between metaphysics and ethics, and the (...)
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