Search results for 'PGD' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Sparrow (2013). Queerin' the PGD Clinic. Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):177-196.score: 24.0
    Disability activists influenced by queer theory and advocates ofhuman enhancementhave each disputed the idea that what isnormalis normatively significant, which currently plays a (...)
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  2. Crystal K. Liu (2007). 'Saviour Siblings'? The Distinction Between PGD with HLA Tissue Typing and Preimplantation HLA Tissue Typing. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):65-70.score: 18.0
    One of the more controversial uses of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) involves selecting embryos with a specific tissue type so that the child to be born can (...)
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  3. Tanja Krones & Gerd Richter (2004). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD): European Perspectives and the German Situation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (5):623 – 640.score: 18.0
    This article gives an overview about the ethical dispute on preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), its legal status and its practical usage in Europe. We provide a detailed (...)
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  4. Richard V. Grazi, Joel B. Wolowelsky & David J. Krieger (2008). Sex Selection by Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Nonmedical Reasons in Contemporary Israeli Regulations. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (03):293-299.score: 18.0
    We report here on recent developments in Israel on the issue of sex selection for nonmedical reasons by preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Sex selection for medical reasons (...)
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  5. E. C. A. Asscher (2008). The Regulation of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in the Netherlands and the UK: a Comparative Study of the Regulatory Frameworks and Outcomes for PGD. Clinical Ethics 3 (4):176-179.score: 15.0
    Developments in biotechnology present difficult social and ethical challenges that need to be resolved by regulators among others. One crucial problem for regulators of new technologies is (...)
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  6. Georg Lohmann (2003). On the Relation Between Moral, Legal and Evaluative Justifications of Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). Ethical Perspectives 10 (3):196-203.score: 15.0
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  7. Bobbie Farsides (2007). To PGD or Not to PGD? Clinical Ethics 2 (3):109-109.score: 15.0
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  8. Michelle Goldsammler & Alan Jotkowitz (2012). The Ethics of PGD: What About the Physician? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):28-29.score: 15.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 4, Page 28-29, April 2012.
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  9. Robert Sparrow (2013). Gender Eugenics? The Ethics of PGD for Intersex Conditions. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):29 - 38.score: 15.0
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  10. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2012). A Parental Duty to Use PGD: More Than We Bargained For? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):14-15.score: 15.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 4, Page 14-15, April 2012.
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  11. Mary Anderlik Majumder (2012). More Mud, Less Crystal? Ambivalence, Disability, and PGD. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):26-28.score: 15.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 4, Page 26-28, April 2012.
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  12. Angela K. Martin & Bernard Baertschi (2012). In Favor of PGD: The Moral Duty to Avoid Harm Argument. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):12-13.score: 15.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 4, Page 12-13, April 2012.
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  13. David Trafimow (2013). The Ethics of PGD for Intersex Conditions: Problems With the Diversity Argument. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):53 - 55.score: 15.0
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  14. Gladys B. White & Michael E. McClure (1998). Introduction: Introducing Innovation Into Practice: Technical and Ethical Analyses of PGD and ICSI Technologies. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (1):5-6.score: 15.0
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  15. Jeff Nisker (2013). Informed Choice and PGD to PreventIntersex Conditions”. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):47 - 49.score: 15.0
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  16. Eva C. A. Asscher (2008). The Regulation of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in the Netherlands and the UK: a Comparative Study of the Regulatory Frameworks and Outcomes for PGD. Clinical Ethics 3 (4):176-179.score: 15.0
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  17. Frances R. Batzer & Vardit Ravitsky (2009). Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (pgd) isapro. In Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.), The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company. 339.score: 15.0
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  18. John Robertson (2002). Sex Selection: Final Word From the ASRM Ethics Committee on the Use of PGD. Hastings Center Report 32 (2):6.score: 15.0
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  19. Sophie E. Bastijn (1999). Genetische Präimplantationsdiagnostik (PGD) in Europäischer Perspektive. Ethik in der Medizin 11 (1):70-76.score: 15.0
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  20. Chelsea Haramia (2013). PGD and Parental Obligations: What Parents Owe to Communities That Do Not Yet Exist. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):41 - 42.score: 15.0
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  21. Sarah E. Stoller (2008). Why We Are Not Morally Required to Select the Best Children: A Response to Savulescu. Bioethics 22 (7):364-369.score: 9.0
    The purpose of this paper is to review critically Julian Savulescu's principle of 'Procreative Beneficence,' which holds that prospective parents are morally obligated to select, of (...)the possible children they could have, those with the greatest chance of leading the best life. According to this principle, prospective parents are obliged to use the technique of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select for the 'best' embryos, a decision that ought to be made based on the presence or absence of both disease traits and non-disease traits such as intelligence. While several articles have been written in response to Savulescu's principle, none has systematically explored its philosophical underpinnings to demonstrate where it breaks down. In this paper I argue that the examples that Savulescu employs to support his theory in fact fail to justify it. He presents these examples as analogous to PGD, when in fact they differ from it in subtle but morally relevant ways. Specifically, Savulescu fails to acknowledge the fact that his examples evoke deontological and virtue ethics concerns that are absent in the context of PGD. These differences turn out to be crucial, so that, in the end, the analogies bear little support for his theory. Finally, I lay out the implications of this analysis for reproductive ethics. (shrink)
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  22. Catherine Dekeuwer & Simone Bateman (2013). Much More Than a Gene: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer, Reproductive Choices and Family Life. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):231-244.score: 9.0
    This article presents the results of a study that investigates the way in which carriers of a mutation on the BRCA1 or the BRCA2 gene, associated with (...)
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  23. Denis Berthiau (2013). Law, Bioethics and Practice in France: Forging a New Legislative Pact. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):105-113.score: 9.0
    In France, bioethics norms have emerged in close interaction with medical practices. The first bioethics laws were adopted in 1994, with provisions for updates in 2004 and (...)
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  24. Robert Sparrow, Better Off Deaf.score: 6.0
  25. Anna Mudde (2010). "Before You Formed in the Womb I Knew You": Sex Selection and Spaces of Ambiguity. Hypatia 25 (3):553 - 576.score: 6.0
    The spaces provided by biotechnologies of sex selection are rich with epistemological, ontological, and ethical considerations that speak to broadly held social values and epistemic frameworks. In (...)
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  26. Andrew Hotke (2014). The Principle of Procreative Beneficence: Old Arguments and A New Challenge. Bioethics 28 (5):255-262.score: 6.0
    In the last ten years, there have been a number of attempts to refute Julian Savulescu's Principle of Procreative Beneficence; a principle which claims that parents (...)have a moral obligation to have the best child that they can possibly have. So far, no arguments against this principle have succeeded at refuting it. This paper tries to explain the shortcomings of some of the more notable arguments against this principle. I attempt to break down the argument for the principle and in doing so, I explain what is needed to properly refute it. This helps me show how and why the arguments of Rebecca Bennett, Sarah Stoller and others fail to refute the principle. Afterwards, I offer a new challenge to the principle. I attack what I understand to be a fundamental premise of the argument, a premise which has been overlooked in the literature written about this principle. I argue that there is no reason to suppose, as Savulescu does, that morality requires us to do what we have most reason to do. If we reject this premise, as I believe we have reason to do, the argument for Procreative Beneficence fails. (shrink)
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  27. Rob Sparrow (2012). Human Enhancement and Sexual Dimorphism. Bioethics 26 (9):464-475.score: 6.0
    I argue that the existence of sexual dimorphism poses a profound challenge to those philosophers who wish to deny the moral significance of the idea ofnormal (...)
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  28. H. Strange & R. Chadwick (2010). The Ethics of Nonmedical Sex Selection. Health Care Analysis 18 (3):252-266.score: 6.0
    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that there are significant ethical problems with nonmedical sex selection, and that prohibitive legislation is justified. The central argument (...)
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  29. Roger Wertheimer (1998). Identity: Logic, Ontology, Epistemology. Philosophy 73 (2):179-193.score: 3.0
    Greece is Hellas and Greeks are Hellenes. Azure is cobalt and everything (coloured) azure is (coloured) cobalt. Pre-Fregeans would call all these statements of identity. <span (...) class='Hi'>Frege</span> taught us to distinguish between Conaming [Name] [Name]. Ngh: Greece is Hellas g=h. Nac: Azure is cobalt a=c Copredicating [Predicate] [Predicate]. PGH: Greeks are Hellenes (x)(Gx[identical with]Hx). PAC: Everything azure is cobalt (x)(Ax[identical with]Cx) Singular Predication [Name] [Predicate]. PcA: Como is azure Ac. PaC: Azure is a colour Ca. PaL: Azure is like indigo Lai. PgD: Greece defeated Persia Dgp. With <span class='Hi'>Frege</span> the contrasts became marked but misconceived. (shrink)
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  30. S. Matthew Liao (2005). The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):116-118.score: 3.0
    It is quite probable that one will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the gender of ones child by directly manipulating the sex (...)of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), since, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroywrong-genderedembryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the ground that the embryo is a person are unlikely to be persuaded by this proposal, though for different reasons. (shrink)
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  31. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2013). Sex Selection and the Procreative Liberty Framework. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):1-18.score: 3.0
    Although surprising to some proponents of sex selection for non-medical reasons (Dahl 2005), a considerable amount of critical debate has been raised by this practice (Blyth, (...)Frith, and Crawshaw 2008; Dawson and Trounson 1996; Dickens 2002; Harris 2005; Heyd 2003; Holm 2004; Macklin 2010; Malpani 2002; McDougall 2005; Purdy 2007; Seavilleklein and Sherwin 2007; Steinbock 2002; Strange and Chadwick 2010; Wilkinson 2008). While abortion or infanticide has long been used as means of sex selection, a new technologypreimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)—has become a highly efficient, and arguably less controversial, way of ensuring the birth of a child of a particular sex. PGD, used in combination with in vitro .. (shrink)
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  32. Catherine Mills (2011). Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics. Springer.score: 3.0
    Issues in reproductive ethics, such as the capacity of parents tochoose children’, present challenges to philosophical ideas of freedom, responsibility and harm. This book responds to (...)
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  33. Tomasz Żuradzki (2012). Niepewność na temat moralnego statusu embrionów ludzkich a preimplantacyjna diagnostyka genetyczna. Diametros 34:179-189.score: 3.0
    W tekście omawiam część internetowej dyskusji, przeprowadzonej w listopadzie 2012 r. na stronie Polskiego Towarzystwa Bioetycznego, która dotyczyła niepewności na temat moralnego statusu embrionów ludzkich. W (...)
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  34. Louis Marx Hall, The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection.score: 3.0
    It is quite probable that one will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the gender of ones child by directly manipulating the sex (...)of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), since, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroywrong-genderedembryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the ground that the embryo is a person are unlikely to be persuaded by this proposal, though for different reasons. (shrink)
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  35. Helen Watt (2004). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Choosing theGood EnoughChild. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (1):51-60.score: 3.0
    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) raises serious moral questions concerning the parent-child relationship. Good parents accept their children unconditionally: they do not reject/attack them because they do (...) not have the features they want. There is nothing wrong with treating a child as someone who can help promote some other worthwhile end, providing the child is also respected as an end in him or herself. However, if the child's presence is not valued in itself, regardless of any further benefits it brings, the child is not being treated as an end in the full sense of the term. In this paper, I argue that these principles apply to human embryos, as well as to born human offspring: the human moral subject is a bodily being, whose interests and rights begin with the onset of his or her bodily life. The rights of the living, bodily human individual include a right not to be attacked/abandoned because of his or her genetic profile. PGD is harmful to the parent-child relationship, and we give mixed messages to parents by expecting them to show unconditional commitment to offspring after birth, while inviting them to take a very different approach at the prenatal stage. (shrink)
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  36. Jeffrey P. Kahn & Anna C. Mastroianni (2004). Creating a Stem Cell Donor: A Case Study in Reproductive Genetics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):81-96.score: 3.0
    : During the nearly 10 years since its introduction, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been used predominantly to avoid giving birth to a child with identified genetic disease (...). Recently, PGD was used by a couple not only to test IVF-created embryos for genetic disease, but also to test for a nondisease trait related to immune compatibility with a child in the family in need of an hematopoetic stem cell transplant. This article describes the case, raises some ethical and policy issues, highlights gaps in U.S. policy, and finally makes some recommendations for addressing advancing genetic and reproductive technologies. (shrink)
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  37. K. Devolder (2005). Preimplantation HLA Typing: Having Children to Save Our Loved Ones. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (10):582-586.score: 3.0
    Next SectionPreimplantation tissue typing has been proposed as a method for creating a tissue matched child that can serve as a haematopoietic stem cell donor to save (...)
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  38. Janet Malek & Judith Daar (2012). The Case for a Parental Duty to Use Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Medical Benefit. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):3-11.score: 3.0
    This article explores the possibility that there is a parental duty to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for the medical benefit of future children. Using one genetic (...)
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  39. Ana Sofia Carvalho & Susana Magalhães (2012). Searching for Otherness: The View of a Novel. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (2):139-164.score: 3.0
    The ethical issues concerning the use of PGD (Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis) to select embryos of a particular HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) type are numerous. They arise from (...)
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  40. Christian Munthe, Informed Consent and Quality of Available Information.score: 3.0
    Standard versions of the requirement of informed consent state that patients who are offered to enter a clinical trial of a medical procedure should be informed about (...)
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  41. Y. Denier (2010). From Brute Luck to Option Luck? On Genetics, Justice, and Moral Responsibility in Reproduction. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):101-129.score: 3.0
    The structure of our ethical experience depends, crucially, on a fundamental distinction between what we are responsible for doing or deciding and what is given to us. (...)
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  42. Hamza Ali Eskandarani (2010). Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis in the Gulf Cooperative Council Countries:Utilization and Ethical Attitudes. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (2):68-74.score: 3.0
    Objective : Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been utilized by assisted reproductive technology (ART) to genetically screen embryos before placement in the uterus. However, many objections have (...)
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  43. E. Asscher & B.-J. Koops (2009). The Right Not to Know and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Huntington's Disease. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):30-33.score: 3.0
    The right not to know is underappreciated in policy-making. Despite its articulation in medical law and ethics, policy-makers too easily let other concerns override the right (...) not to know. This observation is triggered by a recent decision of the Dutch government on embryo selection for Huntingtons disease. This is a monogenetic debilitating disease without cure, leading to death in early middle age, and thus is a likely candidate for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). People possibly affected with the Huntington gene do not always want to know their genetic status themselves, which is very burdensome knowledge. For prospective parents, this creates a difficulty in having unaffected children through embryo selection without knowing their own genetic status. A solution is provided by the exclusion test: it allows embryo selection while honouring the parentsright not to know. The Dutch government however disallowed the exclusion test and chose to allow PGD on Huntington only for parents who test themselves first. To avoidunnecessaryin-vitro fertilisation procedures for unaffected parents, prospective parents areforced to knowbefore they can conceive through embryo selection. This article analyses the scope of the right not to know in the context of embryo selection against Huntingtons disease. It concludes that the right not to know implies that PGD against Huntington should be allowed by means of the exclusion test. (shrink)
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  44. Patrick Giam (2012). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: A Perspective From Human Dignity`. Bioethics Research Notes 24 (3):40.score: 3.0
    Giam, Patrick This article seeks to explore some further ethical and legal issues surrounding the practice of preimplantation genetic diagnosis which was the subject of a 2009 (...)
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  45. Tomasz Żuradzki (2014). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Rational Choice Under Risk or Uncertainty. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (11):774-778.score: 3.0
    In this paper I present an argument in favour of a parental duty to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). I argue that if embryos created in vitro (...)
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  46. E. Mendieta (2004). Habermas on Human Cloning: The Debate on the Future of the Species. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (5-6):721-743.score: 3.0
    Jürgen Habermass recent book Die Zukunft der menschlichen Natur (2001) is discussed. Particular attention is paid to the central argument concerning the adverse effects the general (...)acceptance of cloning and pre-implantation genetic diagnostics (PGD) would have on the moral and political self-understanding of present and future generations. The argument turns to a critique of Habermass central arguments against PGD, and develops at least two arguments that are in harmony with his general defense of procedural democracy and deontological morality. Appeal is made to Peter Singer and John Rawls to develop arguments that do not reject either PGD or genetic engineering and that are nonetheless in full compliance with the spirit of political modernity, as it is defended and defined by Habermas. The conclusion calls for less moralizing and more political-economic critique of the biotechnologies unleashed by the information revolution. (shrink)
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  47. Mark Walker (2014). Eugenic Selection Benefits Embryos. Bioethics 28 (5):214-224.score: 3.0
    The primary question to be addressed here is whether pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), used for both negative and positive trait selection, benefits potential supernumerary embryos. The (...)phrasepotential supernumerary embryosis used to indicate that PGD is typically performed on a set of embryos, only some of which will be implanted. Prior to any testing, each embryo in the set is potentially supernumerary in the sense that it may not be selected for implantation. Those embryos that are not selected, and hence destroyed or frozen, areactually supernumerary’. The argument to be advanced is hypothetical: If embryos may be said to benefit or be harmed by our actions, then PGD used to select for an embryo or embryos with the highest expected Wellbeing benefits potential supernumerary embryos. The argument shows that thenon-identityproblem is not sufficient to show that eugenic selection does not benefit supernumerary embryos. (shrink)
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  48. Susanne Benöhr-Laqueur (2011). Fighting in the Legal Grey Area: an Analysis of the German Federal Court of Justice Decision in Case Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Poiesis and Praxis 8 (1):3-8.score: 3.0
    According to the German Embryo Protection Act, PGD has been banned in Germany since 1990; one reason is the legislatures avoiding to insert a revision clause (...)regarding medical advance into the law. The ruling of the German Federal Court of Justice of July 2010 shows the problems resulting out of this approach and declares PGD to be permitted in certain cases. The article discusses the necessity for, as well as the problems of, an interdisciplinary dialogue in the field of reproductive medicine. (shrink)
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  49. C. Farrelly (2009). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, Reproductive Freedom, and Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (2):135-154.score: 3.0
    In this paper I argue that the account of deliberative democracy advanced by Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson (1996, 2004) is a useful normative theory that can (...)
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