Search results for 'Painting Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Earle Jerome Coleman (1978). Philosophy of Painting by Shih-Tʻao: A Translation and Exposition of His Hua-Pʻu (Treatise on the Philosophy of Painting). Mouton.
  2.  16
    Christian Lotz (2009). Representation or Sensation? A Critique of Deleuze’s Philosophy of Painting. Sympsium. Canadian Journal for Continental Philosophy 13 (1):59-73.
    In this paper I shall present an argument against Deleuze’s philosophy of painting. Deleuze’s main thesis in Logic of Sensation is twofold: [1] he claims that painting is based on a non-representational level; and [2] he claims that this level comes out of the materiality of painting. I shall claim that Deleuze’s theses should be rejected for the following reasons: first, the difference between non-intentional life and the representational world is too strict. I submit that the (...)
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  3.  13
    Michael Newall (2014). Painting and Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 9 (4):225-237.
    This article is primarily concerned with the philosophical problems that arise out of a consideration of painting. By painting I mean of course not any kind of application of paint to a surface – house painting for instance – but painting as an art, to use Richard Wollheim's phrase. Since Plato, philosophy has intermittently been concerned with these problems, and over the past 30 years, painting has come under a new focus as philosophy (...)
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  4.  16
    Christian Lotz (2009). Representation or Sensation? A Critique of Deleuze’s Philosophy of Painting. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 13 (1):59-72.
    In this paper, I shall present an argument against Deleuze’s philosophy of painting. Deleuze’s main thesis in Logic of Sensation is twofold: [1] he claims that painting is based on a non-representational level; and [2] he claims that this level comes out of the materiality of painting. I shall claim that Deleuze’s theses should be rejected for the following reasons: first, the difference between non-intentional life and the representational world is too strict. I submit that the (...)
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  5.  9
    Adam Glover (2013). Painting Borges: Philosophy Interpreting Art Interpreting Literature by Jorge J. E. Gracia (Review). The Pluralist 8 (2):106-113.
    Montaigne said it in the sixteenth century, and Plato's Ion said it long before: we are but interpreters of interpretations. Jorge J. E. Gracia's Painting Borges: Philosophy Interpreting Art Interpreting Literature rests upon the assumption that this somewhat plaintive verdict on the inescapability of interpretation is in fact an occasion for celebration. For various reasons—some of which I will discuss below—Painting Borges is a welcome addition to the field of interpretation theory and will be of interest not (...)
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  6. Ning Yeh (1981). The Art of Chinese Brush Painting: Ning Yeh's First Album: An Introduction to Fundamental Philosophy and Basic Subjects. N. Yeh.
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  7. James Gordon Place (1976). The Painting and the Natural Thing in the Philosophy of Merleau-Ponty. Philosophy and Social Criticism 4 (1):75-91.
  8. G. G. G. G. (1887). Bryant, W. M., Philosophy of Landscape Painting. [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21:328.
     
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  9.  11
    Darren Ambrose (2006). Deleuze, Philosophy, and the Materiality of Painting. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 10 (1):191-211.
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  10.  5
    David Carrier (1994). The Aesthete in the City: The Philosophy and Practice of American Abstract Painting in the 1980s. Penn State University Press.
    In the 1980s, when the American art market flourished, critics were heavily concerned with theory. In T_he Aesthete in the City_ David Carrier offers a personal view on the artistic activity of that decade. He begins with a theoretical perspective on the relationship between two very different forms of artwriting: art criticism and art history writing. Carrier surveys the developments within theory during the 1980s, focusing on constructive critical analysis of the then fashionable work of Jean Baudrillard, Walter Benjamin, T. (...)
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  11. Wilfrid Desan (1982). Aristotle or Bruegel: Is Philosophy a Mode of Painting. Philosophy Today 26 (3):217-225.
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  12. Ronald W. Hepburn (1960). Aesthetics and Abstract Painting: Two Views: PHILOSOPHY. Philosophy 35 (133):97-113.
    Aesthetic theories, like theories of morals, are roughly divisible into those that maintain an analytic neutrality and those that attempt to arrive at “first-order”, practical judgments. A philo sopher of language may confine the legitimate task of aesthetics to the clarification of talk about works of art and about the fashioning of works of art. But other aestheticians, perhaps a more numerous group, see their study as far more intimately related to art criticism, and as able, without the committing of (...)
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  13. Galen A. Johnson (ed.) (1993). The Merleau-Ponty Aesthetics Reader: Philosophy and Painting. Northwestern University Press.
    PART INTRODUCTIONS TO MERLEAU- PONTY'S PHI LOSOPH Y OF PAI NTI NG Galen A. Johnson ...
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  14.  64
    Eric S. Nelson (2013). Generativities: Western Philosophy, Chinese Painting, and the Yijing. Orbis Idearum 1 (1):97–104.
  15. James Maffie (2000). 'Like a Painting, We Will Be Erased; Like a Flower, We Will Dry Up Here on Earth': Ultimate Reality and Meaning According to Nahua Philosophy in the Age of Conquest. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 23 (4):295-318.
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  16.  9
    Paul M. Laporte (1947). Attic Vase Painting and Pre-Socratic Philosophy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 6 (2):139-152.
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  17.  1
    Bernard Zelechow (1994). A Painting is a Painting? Some Cracks in the Armour of Formalist Aesthetics and Analytic Philosophy. History of European Ideas 18 (1):79-85.
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  18.  1
    Adam Glover (2013). Review Painting Borges: Philosophy Interpreting Art Interpreting Literature Gracia Jorge J. E. State U of New York P Albany. The Pluralist 8 (2):106-113.
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  19. Darren Ambrose (2006). Deleuze, Philosophy, and the Materiality of Painting. Symposium 10 (1):191-211.
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  20. Earle J. Coleman (1979). Philosophy of Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (1):102-104.
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  21. Paul Crowther (1988). Merleau-Ponty: Vision and Painting in Art and Philosophy: Mutual Connections and Inspirations. Dialectics and Humanism 15 (1-2):107-118.
     
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  22. Jorge J. E. Gracia (2012). Painting Borges: Philosophy Interpreting Art Interpreting Literature. State University of New York Press.
    A provocative examination of the artistic interpretation of twelve of Borges’s most famous stories.
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  23. Michael B. Smith (ed.) (1994). The Merleau-Ponty Aesthetics Reader: Philosophy and Painting. Northwestern University Press.
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  24. Nigel Wentworth (2004). The Phenomenology of Painting. Cambridge University Press.
    The Phenomenology of Painting examines the practice of painting - how a painter works with materials, the elements of space, form and color - and viewer response to a work of art. Nigel Wentworth seeks to answer some of the central questions of the philosophy of art, such as: To what extent can a painting and its meaning be understood to result from the artist's intentions? In what way can the painting be understood as an (...)
     
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  25.  63
    Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
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  26.  90
    Richard Wollheim (2001). Richard Wollheim on the Art of Painting: Art as Representation and Expression. Cambridge University Press.
    Richard Wollheim is one of the dominant figures in the philosophy of art, whose work has shown not only how paintings create their effects but why they remain important to us. His influential writings have focused on two core, interrelated questions: How do paintings depict? and how do they express feelings? In this collection of new essays a distinguished group of thinkers in the fields of art history and philosophical aesthetics offers a critical assessment of Wollheim's theory of art. (...)
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  27. Jean-Luc Marion (2004). The Crossing of the Visible. Stanford University Press.
    Painting, according to Jean-Luc Marion, is a central topic of concern for philosophy, particularly phenomenology. For the question of painting is, at its heart, a question of visibility—of appearance. As such, the painting is a privileged case of the phenomenon; the painting becomes an index for investigating the conditions of appearance—or what Marion describes as “phenomenality” in general. In The Crossing of the Visible, Marion takes up just such a project. The natural outgrowth of his (...)
     
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  28.  1
    Harsha V. Dehejia (2000). Despair and Modernity: Reflections From Modern Indian Painting. Motilal Banarasidass Publishers.
    Dehejia has tried to create a place within the main frame of culture and philosophy of Indian art for a legitimate analytic theory called despair.
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  29.  25
    Joseph Margolis (2009). The Arts and the Definition of the Human: Toward a Philosophical Anthropology. Stanford University Press.
    The definition of the human -- Perceiving paintings as paintings I -- Perceiving paintings as paintings II -- "One and only one correct interpretation" -- Toward a phenomenology of painting and literature -- "Seeing-in," "make-believe," transfiguration" : the perception of pictorial representation -- Beauty and truth and the passing of transcendental philosophy.
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  30. Stephen Bann (1970). Experimental Painting: Construction, Abstraction, Destruction, Reduction. London,Studio Vista.
     
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  31. Véronique Marion Fóti (ed.) (1996). Merleau-Ponty: Difference, Materiality, Painting. Humanities Press.
  32. Diane Kelder (1976). Aspects of "Official" Painting and Philosophic Art, 1789-1799. Garland Pub..
     
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  33. Jichao Liu (2011). You Guan: Zhongguo Gu Dian Hui Hua Kong Jian Ben Ti Quan Shi = Wandering-Observing: Ontology and Interpretation of Space in Traditional Chinese Painting. Sheng Huo, du Shu, Xin Zhi San Lian Shu Dian.
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  34.  16
    Gillian Rose (1996). Mourning Becomes the Law: Philosophy and Representation. Cambridge University Press.
    In Mourning Becomes the Law, Gillian Rose takes us beyond the impasse of post-modernism or 'despairing rationalism withour reason'. Arguing that the post-modern search for a 'new ethics' and ironic philosophy are incoherent, she breathes new life into the debates concerning power and domination, transcendence and eternity. Mourning Becomes the Law is the philosophical counterpart to Gillian Rose's highly acclaimed memoir Love's Work. She extends similar clarity and insight to discussions of architecture, cinema, painting and poetry, through which (...)
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  35. Keith Ansell-Pearson & Keith Ansell Pearson (eds.) (1997). Deleuze and Philosophy: The Difference Engineer. Routledge.
    The work of Gilles Deleuze has had an impact far beyond philosophy. He is among Foucault and Derrida as one of the most cited of all contemporary French thinkers. Never a student 'of' philosophy, Deleuze was always philosophical and many influential poststructuralist and postmodernist texts can be traced to his celebrated resurrection of Nietzsche against Hegel in his Nietzsche and Philosophy , from which this collection draws its title. This searching new collection considers Deleuze's relation to the (...)
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  36.  34
    Alan Paskow (2004). The Paradoxes of Art: A Phenomenological Investigation. Cambridge University Press.
    In this study, Alan Paskow first asks why fictional characters, such as Hamlet and Anna Karenina, matter to us and how they emotionally affect us. He then applies these questions to painting, demonstrating that certain paintings beckon us to view their contents as real. What we visualise in paintings, he argues, is not simply in our heads but in our world. No one would assert that the paintings themselves are in our heads; nor would anyone deny that they are (...)
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  37.  31
    Andrew Benjamin (2011). On the Image of Painting. Research in Phenomenology 41 (2):181-205.
    Painting can only be thought in relation to the image. And yet, with (and within) painting what continues to endure is the image of painting. While this is staged explicitly in, for example, paintings of St. Luke by artists of the Northern Renaissance—e.g., Rogier van der Weyden, Jan Gossaert, and Simon Marmion—the same concerns are also at work within both the practices as well as the contemporaneous writings that define central aspects of the Italian Renaissance. The aim (...)
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  38.  15
    Philip Alperson (ed.) (1992). The Philosophy of the Visual Arts. Oxford University Press.
    Most instructors who teach introductory courses in aesthetics or the philosophy of arts use the visual arts as their implicit reference for "art" in general, yet until now there has been no aesthetics anthology specifically orientated to the visual arts. This text stresses conceptual and theoretical issues, first examining the very notion of "the visual arts " and then investigating philosophical questions raised by various forms, from painting, the paradigmatic form, to sculpture, photography, film, dance, kitsch, (...)
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  39. Andrew E. Benjamin (ed.) (1995). Complexity: Architecture, Art, Philosophy. Distributed to the Trade in the United States of America by National Book Network.
    JPVA Journal of Philosophy and the Visual Arts No 6 Complexity Architecture / Art / Philosophy 'Beginning with complexity will involve working with the recognition that there has always been more than one. Here however this insistent "more than one" will be positioned beyond the scope of semantics; rather than complexity occurring within the range of meaning and taking the form of a generalised polysemy, it will be linked to the nature of the object and to its production. (...)
     
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  40. Tamás Demeter (ed.) (2004). Essays on Wittgenstein and Austrian Philosophy: In Honour of J.C. Nyíri. Rodopi.
    Essays on Wittgenstein and Austrian Philosophy is presented for the 60th birthday of professor Christoph Nyíri. The essays presented here for the first time are focused on Austrian intellectual history, and on Wittgenstein’s philosophy – the two main areas of Professor Nyíri’s interests. Typically, the contributors are outstanding scholars of the field, including among others David Bloor, Lee Congdon, Newton Garver, Wilhelm Lütterfields, Joachim Schulte, Barry Smith. The volume is of primary interest for Wittgenstein scholars and those studying (...)
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  41. Hugh J. Silverman (ed.) (1990). Postmodernism: Philosophy and the Arts. Routledge.
    The essays collected here present a cross section of the debates on postmodernism being waged in philosophy and the arts. Some contributors raise general questions about postmodernism, for example, its language and its politics. Others offer specific readings of architecture, painting, literature, theatre, photography, film, and television.
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  42.  34
    Machiel Keestra (2014). Mirrors of the Soul and Mirrors of the Brain? The Expression of Emotions as the Subject of Art and Science. In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. Nai010 Publishers 81-92.
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
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  43.  85
    Kate Abramson (2007). Hume's Distinction Between Philosophical Anatomy and Painting. Philosophy Compass 2 (5):680–698.
    Although the implications of Humes distinction between philosophical anatomy and painting have been the subject of lively scholarly debates, it is a puzzling fact that the details of the distinction itself have largely been a matter of interpretive presumption rather than debate. This would be unproblematic if Humes views about these two species of philosophy were obvious, or if there were a rich standard interpretation of the distinction that we had little reason to doubt. But a careful review (...)
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  44.  11
    Christian Lotz (2012). Distant Presence: Representation, Painting and Photography in Gerhard Richter’s Reader. Painting and Photography in Gerhard Richter’s Reader,” Symposium. Canadian Journal for Continental Philosophy 16 (1):87-111.
    An essay concerning the representation of images in art, photography, and painting concerning analysis of Gerhard Richter's painting reader. It offers a debate that representation should be regarded as an act of formation and a performative concept. The author presents analysis of painting which leads the reader into the problem of painted images, such as the constitution of an image by a complex relationship among memory, reading, and blindness.
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  45.  16
    Bruce V. Foltz (2006). The Resurrection of Nature: Environmental Metaphysics in Sergei Bulgakov's Philosophy of Economy. Philosophy and Theology 18 (1):121-142.
    Although equal in power to other facets of the rich cultural ferment of modern Russia that have profoundly influenced Western civilization—such as painting, literature, drama, and politics—the authentic legacy of twentieth-century Russian philosophy has until recently been eclipsed by Soviet ideological dominance. Of the important philosophers drawing upon the characteristically Russian synthesis of Ancient Neoplatonism, German Idealism, and Byzantine spirituality, Sergei Bulgakov is outstanding, and his work has important implications for our contemporary thinking about the relationship between humanity (...)
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  46.  12
    Aaron Meskin (2012). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Philosophy of Comics. Philosophy Compass 7 (5):361-364.
    This guide accompanies the following article: Aaron Meskin, ‘The Philosophy of Comics’. Philosophy Compass 6/12 : 854–64. doi: 10.1111/j.1747‐9991.2011.00450.xAuthor’s IntroductionComics have been around since at least the middle of the 19th century, but they are just beginning to receive philosophical attention. Much of this recent philosophical work has focused on the definition of comics and their relation to other art forms , but recent work on such topics as narrative in comics, comics authorship, the relationship between words and (...)
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  47.  2
    Anne Élisabeth Sejten (2012). Écarts léonardiens de Paul Valéry: l'esprit sensible. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 5 (1).
    Demonstrating the importance of the circumstantial writings by Paul Valéry, the present essay points out his very first “commission” on Leonardo da Vinci as emblematic of a new sensitive philosophical reflexiveness. In fact, Valéry kept returning to the great renaissance phenomenon of Leonardo, in his twisted Introduction à la Méthode de Léonard de Vinci (1894), rewritten some 25 years later with Note et digression (1919), as well in his staging of philosophers and artists in Léonard et les philosophes (1929). The (...)
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  48. Iñigo Kristien Marcel Bocken & Tilman Borsche (eds.) (2010). Kann Das Denken Malen?: Philosophie Und Malerei in der Renaissance. Fink.
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  49.  41
    Cynthia A. Freeland (2010). Portraits and Persons: A Philosophical Inquiry. Oxford University Press.
    Featuring more than fifty halftones, this is an exhilarating philosophical exploration of portraiture that highlights its important contribution to the complex ...
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  50. Miriam Iacomini (2008). Le Parole E le Immagini: Saggio Su Michel Foucault. Quodlibet.
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