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Profile: Paisley Livingston (Lingnan University, Hong Kong)
  1. Kelly Trogdon & Paisley Livingston (2014). The Complete Work. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):225-233.
    What is it for a work of art to be complete? In this article, we argue that an artwork is complete just in case the artist has acquired a completion disposition with respect to her work—a disposition grounded in certain cognitive mechanisms to refrain from making significant changes to the work. We begin by explaining why the complete/incomplete distinction with respect to artworks is both practically and philosophically significant. Then we consider and reject two approaches to artwork completion. Finally, we (...)
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  2. Paisley Livingston (2013). Du Bos' Paradox. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):393-406.
    What is now generally known as the paradox of art and negative affect was identified as a paradox by the Abbé Jean-Baptiste Du Bos in 1719. In his attempt to explain how people can admire and enjoy representational works that ‘afflict’ them, Du Bos claims that such representations give rise to ‘artificial’ emotions, provide a pleasurable relief from boredom, and offer us epistemic, artistic, and moral rewards. The paper delineates Du Bos’ proposal, considers the question of Du Bos’ originality, and (...)
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  3. Paisley Livingston (2013). Language, Truth, and Literature: A Defence of Literary Humanism. By Gaskin, Richard. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):1-4.
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  4. Paisley Livingston (2013). Language, Truth, and Literature: A Defence of Literary Humanism. By Gaskin, Richard: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, Pp. Xvii+ 376,£ 50.00 (Hardback). [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  5. Paisley Livingston (2012). On Cinematic Genius: Ontology and Appreciation. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 71:85-104.
    is often associated with the idea that artistic creativity is entirely a matter of an involuntary sort of inspiration visited upon the individual artist. [1] My aim in referring to cinematic genius is not, however, to defend that dubious thesis, but to direct attention to the remarkable artistic achievements that some film-makers, working individually or in collaborative teams, have managed to bring about in their intentional and often painstaking creation of cinematic works. Genius, as I understand it, is the exceptional (...)
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  6. Paisley Livingston (2011). Creativity and Art: Three Roads to Surprise by Boden, Margaret A. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):423-425.
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  7. Paisley Livingston, History of the Ontology of Art. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    First critical survey devoted to the history of philosophical contributions to this topic. Brings to light neglected contributions prior to the second half of the 20th century including works in Danish, German, and French. Provides a division of issues and clarifies key ambiguities related to modality.
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  8. Paisley Livingston (2011). On Authorship and Collaboration. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):221-225.
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  9. Paisley Nathan Livingston (2011). Discussion: On Authorship and Collaboration. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):217-220.
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  10. Paisley Livingston & Andrea Sauchelli (2011). Philosophical Perspectives on Fictional Characters. New Literary History 42 (2):337-360.
    This paper takes up a series of basic philosophical questions about the nature and existence of fictional characters. We begin with realist approaches that hinge on the thesis that at least some claims about fictional characters can be right or wrong because they refer to something that exists, such as abstract objects. Irrealist approaches deny such realist postulations and hold instead that fictional characters are a figment of the human imagination. A third family of approaches, based on work by Alexius (...)
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  11. Paisley Livingston (2010). Authorial Intention and the Varieties of Intentionalism. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  12. Paisley Livingston (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Cinema as Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):359-362.
    The idea that films can be philosophical, or in some sense 'do' philosophy, has recently found a number of prominent proponents. What is at stake here is generally more than the tepid claim that some documentaries about philosophy and related topics convey philosophically relevant content. Instead, the contention is that cinematic fictions, including popular movies such as The Matrix , make significant contributions to philosophy. Various more specific claims are linked to this basic idea. One, relatively weak, but pedagogically important (...)
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  13. Paisley Livingston (2009). Cinema, Philosophy, Bergman: On Film as Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The increasingly popular idea that cinematic fictions can "do" philosophy raises some difficult questions. Who is actually doing the philosophizing? Is it the philosophical commentator who reads general arguments or theories into the stories conveyed by a film? Could it be the film-maker, or a group of collaborating film-makers, who raise and try to answer philosophical questions with a film? Is there something about the experience of films that is especially suited to the stimulation of worthwhile philosophical reflections? In the (...)
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  14. Paisley Livingston (2009). Narrativity and Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (1):25-36.
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  15. Paisley Livingston (2008). Authorship Redux: On Some Recent and Not-so-Recent Work in Literary Theory. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 191-197.
    Did Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, or other "poststructuralist" theorists writing in the wake of May '68 come up with any good ideas about authorship and related topics in the philosophy of literature? The three volumes under review have a common point of departure in that broad question, but offer a number of contrasting responses to it. In what follows I describe and assess some of the various perspectives on offer in these 700 or so pages. The short answer (...)
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  16. Paisley Livingston (2008). Recent Work on Cinema as Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 3 (4):590-603.
    Although the cinematic medium can be used in philosophically valuable ways, bold contentions about how films 'do philosophy' in an independent, innovative and exclusively cinematic manner are highly problematic. Philosophers' interpretations of the stories conveyed in cinematic fictions do not actually support such bold claims about film's independent philosophical value; nor do they offer adequate appreciations of the films' artistic value. Different kinds of interpretations having different goals and conditions of success should be kept in view if we are to (...)
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  17. Paisley Livingston (2008). Solid Objects, Solid Objections : On Virginia Woolf and Philosophy. In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell Pub.. 123--143.
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  18. Paisley Livingston (2008). When a Work Is Finished: A Response to Darren Hudson Hick. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):393-395.
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  19. Paisley Livingston & Carl R. Plantinga (eds.) (2008). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film. Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film is the first comprehensive volume to explore the main themes, topics, thinkers and issues in philosophy and film.
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  20. Paisley Livingston (2006). Theses on Cinema as Philosophy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (1):11–18.
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  21. Paisley Livingston (2006). The Philosophy of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):431-433.
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  22. Paisley Livingston (2006). Utile Et Dulce: A Response to Noël Carroll. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (3):274-281.
    l Carroll's criticisms of my essay on C. I. Lewis's conception of aesthetic experience, I discuss reasons given in support of axiological accounts of aesthetic experience, including Lewis's contentions about the intrinsic valence of all experiences and his emphasis on the interests motivating philosophical classifications of experience. I also respond to Carroll's remarks about a possible explanatory requirement on a conception of aesthetic experience and the idea that artists have aesthetic experiences as they make a work of art.
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  23. Paisley Livingston (2005). Art and Intention: A Philosophical Study. Oxford University Press.
    In Art and intention Paisley Livingston develops a broad and balanced perspective on perennial disputes between intentionalists and anti-intentionalists in philosophical aesthetics and critical theory. He surveys and assesses a wide range of rival assumptions about the nature of intentions and the status of intentionalist psychology. With detailed reference to examples from diverse media, art forms, and traditions, he demonstrates that insights into the multiple functions of intentions have important implications for our understanding of artistic creation and authorship, the ontology (...)
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  24. Paisley Livingston (2005). Intention in Art. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oup Oxford.
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  25. Paisley Livingston (2005). Literature. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oup Oxford.
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  26. Paisley Livingston (2005). L'ontologie et la valeur artistique. Philosophiques 32 (1):224-229.
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  27. Paisley Livingston (2004). C. I. Lewis and the Outlines of Aesthetic Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):378-392.
    The current essay describes aspects of C. I. Lewis’s rarely cited contributions to aesthetics, focusing primarily on the conception of aesthetic experience developed in An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation. Lewis characterized aesthetic value as a proper subset of inherent value, which he understood as the power to occasion intrinsically valued experiences. He distinguished aesthetic experiences from experiences more generally in terms of eight conditions. Roughly, he proposed that aesthetic experiences have a highly positive, preponderantly intrinsic value realized through contemplation, (...)
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  28. Berys Nigel Gaut & Paisley Livingston (eds.) (2003). The Creation of Art: New Essays in Philosophical Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.
    Although creativity, from Plato onwards, has been recognized as a topic in philosophy, it has been overshadowed by investigations of the meanings and values of works of art. In this new collection of essays a distinguished roster of philosophers of art redress this trend. The subjects discussed include the nature of creativity and the process of artistic creation; the role that creative making should play in our understanding and evaluation of art; relations between concepts of creation and creativity; and ideas (...)
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  29. Paisley Livingston (2003). Nested Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (3):233–246.
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  30. Paisley Livingston (2003). On an Apparent Truism in Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):260-278.
    It has often been claimed that adequate aesthetic judgements must be grounded in the appreciator's first-hand experience of the item judged. Yet this apparent truism is misleading if adequate aesthetic judgements can instead be based on descriptions of the item or on acquaintance with some surrogate for it. In a survey of responses to such challenges to the apparent truism, I identify several contentions presented in its favour, including stipulative definitions of ‘aesthetic judgement’, assertions about conceptual gaps between determinate aesthetic (...)
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  31. Paisley Livingston (2002). Rationality and Emotion. SATS 3 (2):7-24.
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  32. Paisley Livingston (2001). Narrative. In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
     
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  33. Paisley Nathan Livingston (2001). Contribution to a Book Forum on Athenes Kammer. SATS 2 (1):166-168.
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  34. Paisley Livingston (2000). Søren Kjørup. Kunstens Filosofi: En Indføring I Œstetik. Roskilde: Roskilde Universitets Forlag, 2000, 213 Pp. [REVIEW] SATS 1 (2).
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  35. Paisley Livingston (1999). Cinematic Authorship. In Richard Allen & Murray Smith (eds.), Film Theory and Philosophy. Oup Oxford.
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  36. Paisley Livingston (1999). Counting Fragments, and Frenhofer's Paradox. British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (1):14-23.
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  37. Paisley Livingston & Alfred Mele (1997). Evaluating Emotional Responses to Fiction. In Mette Hjort & Sue Laver (eds.), Emotion and the Arts.
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  38. Paisley Livingston (1996). Arguing Over Intentions. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 50 (198):615-633.
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  39. Paisley Livingston (1996). From Work to Work. Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):436-454.
  40. Paisley Livingston (1994). What is Mimetic Desire? Philosophical Psychology 7 (3):291 – 305.
    This essay provides a conceptual analysis and reconstruction of the notion of mimetic desire, first proposed in Girard (1961). The basic idea behind the idea of mimetic desire is that imitation can play a key role in human motivational processes. Yet mimetic desire is distinguished from related notions such as social modelling and imitation. In episodes of mimetic desire, the process in which the imitative agent's desires are formed is oriented by a particular species of belief about the model or (...)
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  41. Paisley Livingston (1993). Le dilemme de Bratman : problèmes de la rationalité dynamique. Philosophiques 20 (1):47-67.
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  42. Paisley Livingston (1993). Why Realism Matters: Literary Knowledge and the Philosophy of Science. In George Levine (ed.), Realism and Representation. University of Wisconsin Press. 134--54.
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  43. Alfred R. Mele & Paisley Livingston (1992). Intentions and Interpretations. MLN 107:931-949.
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  44. Alfred R. Mele & Paisley Livingston (1992). Intention and Literature. Stanford French Review 16:173-196.
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  45. Paisley Livingston (1991). Literature and Rationality: Ideas of Agency in Theory and Fiction. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores concepts of rationality drawn from philosophy and the social sciences, in relation to traditions of literary enquiry. The author surveys basic assumptions and questions in philosophical accounts of action, in decision theory, and in the theory of rational choice. He gives examples ranging from Icelandic sagas to Poe and Beckett, and examines some situations and actions drawn from American and European fiction in order to analyze issues raised by contemporary models of agency. Challenging poststructuralism's irrationalist images of (...)
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  46. Paisley Livingston (1991). T. S. Eliot and the Philosophy of Criticism, by Richard Shusterman. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (2):459-462.
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  47. Paisley Livingston (1988). Literary Knowledge: Humanistic Inquiry and the Philosophy of Science. Cornell University Press.
     
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  48. Paisley Livingston (ed.) (1984). Disorder and Order: Proceedings of the Stanford International Symposium (Sept. 14-16, 1981). Anma Libri.
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